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I've got a search field.

Right now it searches for every keyup. So if someone types Windows, it will make a search with AJAX for every keypress: W, Wi, Win, Wind, Windo, Window, Windows.

I want to have a delay, so it only searches when the user stops typing for 200 ms.

There is no option for this in the keyup function, and I have tried setTimeout, but it didn't work.

How can I do that?

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2  
Duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/1620602/… –  Roatin Marth Dec 15 '09 at 18:36
31  
you make it sounds like a crime:) but maybe its good to have some "duplicates" to generate different approaches to the problem. quantity is a good thing too. –  ajsie Dec 15 '09 at 18:52
5  
I fail to see the harm in having duplicates, as long as the answers given and accepted are correct. Adding to the database of questions must be something good and something to strive for. –  Mattis May 4 '11 at 12:17
4  
The harm is people in the future won't be able to benefit from the brilliant answers everyone shares if there are 100 of the same question, so closing dupes and redirecting everyone to the original question is better for finding best practices and fixes. See stackoverflow.com/help/duplicates for more info on why duplicates are closed. –  rncrtr Jun 21 '13 at 5:39
6  
This is way more popular than the one it was supposedly duplicating. It's better worded, it has better answers, ranks higher on google etc.. So many have benefited from this answer. In retrospect, it would have been a shame if this was closed. There are some trivial ones that are bad as duplicates, but this doesn't fall in that category. –  buffer Jul 2 '14 at 19:30

18 Answers 18

up vote 589 down vote accepted

I use this function for the same purpose, executing a function after the user has stopped typing for a specified amount of time:

var delay = (function(){
  var timer = 0;
  return function(callback, ms){
    clearTimeout (timer);
    timer = setTimeout(callback, ms);
  };
})();

Usage:

$('input').keyup(function() {
    delay(function(){
      alert('Time elapsed!');
    }, 1000 );
});

For something more sophisticated, give a look to the jQuery Typewatch plugin.

share|improve this answer
47  
Another alternative: github.com/bgrins/bindWithDelay/blob/master/bindWithDelay.js. It pretty much works the same way you described, I just found myself using that pattern a lot so implemented it as a jQuery plugin to make the syntax simpler. Here is a demo page: briangrinstead.com/files/bindWithDelay –  Brian Grinstead Aug 13 '10 at 14:31
    
i initially hardcoded the amount of letters typed, this approach is smooth as molasses (without sulfer) –  Har Feb 28 '12 at 15:35
    
When I use this with a $.post() it sends everything typed at the same time, but it sends it as many times as I had a keyup. Is there a way to send ONLY when the timeout is over? –  ntgCleaner Jun 13 '12 at 20:24
    
@ntgCleaner, could you post an example reproducing the problem (maybe at jsfiddle.net or jsbin.com)? That way I will be able to help you. –  CMS Jun 13 '12 at 20:41
    
@CMS : alt+tab sends a new request ...how to ignore it –  sqlchild Jul 1 '13 at 13:42

If you want to search after the type is done use a global variable to hold the timeout returned from your setTimout call and cancel it with a clearTimeout if it hasn't yet happend so that it won't fire the timeout except on the last keyup event

var globalTimeout = null;  
$('#id').keyup(function(){
  if(globalTimeout != null) clearTimeout(globalTimeout);  
  globalTimeout =setTimeout(SearchFunc,200);  
}   
function SearchFunc(){  
  globalTimeout = null;  
  //ajax code
}

Or with an anonymous function :

var globalTimeout = null;  
$('#id').keyup(function() {
  if (globalTimeout != null) {
    clearTimeout(globalTimeout);
  }
  globalTimeout = setTimeout(function() {
    globalTimeout = null;  

    //ajax code

  }, 200);  
}   
share|improve this answer
    
Your second example works perfect. Thanks! –  Jo Smo Jul 29 at 0:14

You could also look at underscore.js, which provides utility methods like debounce:

var lazyLayout = _.debounce(calculateLayout, 300);
$(window).resize(lazyLayout);
share|improve this answer
1  
nice powerful lightweight library +1 –  Shanimal May 2 '12 at 16:18

Based on the answer of CMS, I made this :

Put the code below after include jQuery :

/*
 * delayKeyup
 * http://code.azerti.net/javascript/jquery/delaykeyup.htm
 * Inspired by CMS in this post : http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1909441/jquery-keyup-delay
 * Written by Gaten
 * Exemple : $("#input").delayKeyup(function(){ alert("5 secondes passed from the last event keyup."); }, 5000);
 */
(function ($) {
    $.fn.delayKeyup = function(callback, ms){
        var timer = 0;
        $(this).keyup(function(){                   
            clearTimeout (timer);
            timer = setTimeout(callback, ms);
        });
        return $(this);
    };
})(jQuery);

And simply use like this :

$('#input').delayKeyup(function(){ alert("5 secondes passed from the last event keyup."); }, 5000);

Careful : the $(this) variable in the function passed as a parameter does not match input

share|improve this answer

This worked for me where I delay the search logic operation and make a check if the value is same as entered in text field. If value is same then I go ahead and perform the operation for the data related to search value.

$('#searchText').on('keyup',function () {
    var searchValue = $(this).val();
    setTimeout(function(){
        if(searchValue == $('#searchText').val() && searchValue != null && searchValue != "") {
           // logic to fetch data based on searchValue
        }
        else if(searchValue == ''){
           // logic to load all the data
        }
    },300);
});
share|improve this answer
    
Pretty close to what I needed thanks for the help and post! –  wallerjake Jun 17 '14 at 17:29

This function extends the function from Gaten's answer a bit in order to get the element back:

$.fn.delayKeyup = function(callback, ms){
    var timer = 0;
    var el = $(this);
    $(this).keyup(function(){                   
    clearTimeout (timer);
    timer = setTimeout(function(){
        callback(el)
        }, ms);
    });
    return $(this);
};

$('#input').delayKeyup(function(el){
    //alert(el.val());
    // Here I need the input element (value for ajax call) for further process
},1000);

http://jsfiddle.net/Us9bu/2/

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I'm surprised that nobody mention the problem with multiple input in CMS's very nice snipped.

Basically, you would have to define delay variable individually for each input. Otherwise if sb put text to first input and quickly jump to other input and start typing, callback for the first one WON'T be called!

See the code below I came with based on other answers:

(function($) {
    /**
     * KeyUp with delay event setup
     * 
     * @link http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1909441/jquery-keyup-delay#answer-12581187
     * @param function callback
     * @param int ms
     */
    $.fn.delayKeyup = function(callback, ms){
            $(this).keyup(function( event ){
                var srcEl = event.currentTarget;
                if( srcEl.delayTimer )
                    clearTimeout (srcEl.delayTimer );
                srcEl.delayTimer = setTimeout(function(){ callback( $(srcEl) ); }, ms);
            });

        return $(this);
    };
})(jQuery);

This solution keeps setTimeout reference within input's delayTimer variable. It also passes reference of element to callback as fazzyx suggested.

Tested in IE6, 8(comp - 7), 8 and Opera 12.11.

share|improve this answer
    
Have tried this but can't get to work properly on the first keyup. –  Lars Thorén Sep 18 '14 at 13:50

Use

mytimeout = setTimeout( expression, timeout );

where expression is the script to run and timeout is the time to wait in milliseconds before it runs - this does NOT hault the script, but simply delays execution of that part until the timeout is done.

clearTimeout(mytimeout);

will reset/clear the timeout so it does not run the script in expression (like a cancel) as long as it has not yet been executed.

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Use the bindWithDelay jQuery plugin:

element.bindWithDelay(eventType, [ eventData ], handler(eventObject), timeout, throttle)
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Delay function to call up on every keyup. jQuery 1.7.1 or up required

jQuery.fn.keyupDelay = function( cb, delay ){
  if(delay == null){
    delay = 400;
  }
  var timer = 0;
  return $(this).on('keyup',function(){
    clearTimeout(timer);
    timer = setTimeout( cb , delay );
  });
}

Usage: $('#searchBox').keupDelay( cb );

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Based on the answer of CMS, it just ignores the key events that doesn't change value.

var delay = (function(){
    var timer = 0;
    return function(callback, ms){
      clearTimeout (timer);
      timer = setTimeout(callback, ms);
    };
})(); 

var duplicateFilter=(function(){
  var lastContent;
  return function(content,callback){
    content=$.trim(content);
    if(content!=lastContent){
      callback(content);
    }
    lastContent=content;
  };
})();

$("#some-input").on("keyup",function(ev){

  var self=this;
  delay(function(){
    duplicateFilter($(self).val(),function(c){
        //do sth...
        console.log(c);
    });
  }, 1000 );


})
share|improve this answer

Another slight enhancement on CMS's answer. To easily allow for separate delays, you can use the following:

function makeDelay(ms) {
    var timer = 0;
    return function(callback){
        clearTimeout (timer);
        timer = setTimeout(callback, ms);
    };
};

If you want to reuse the same delay, just do

var delay = makeDelay(250);
$(selector1).on('keyup', function() {delay(someCallback);});
$(selector2).on('keyup', function() {delay(someCallback);});

If you want separate delays, you can do

$(selector1).on('keyup', function() {makeDelay(250)(someCallback);});
$(selector2).on('keyup', function() {makeDelay(250)(someCallback);});
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Here is a suggestion I have written that takes care of multiple input in your form.

This function gets the Object of the input field, put in your code

function fieldKeyup(obj){
    //  what you want this to do

} // fieldKeyup

This is the actual delayCall function, takes care of multiple input fields

function delayCall(obj,ms,fn){
    return $(obj).each(function(){
    if ( typeof this.timer == 'undefined' ) {
       // Define an array to keep track of all fields needed delays
       // This is in order to make this a multiple delay handling     
          function
        this.timer = new Array();
    }
    var obj = this;
    if (this.timer[obj.id]){
        clearTimeout(this.timer[obj.id]);
        delete(this.timer[obj.id]);
    }

    this.timer[obj.id] = setTimeout(function(){
        fn(obj);}, ms);
    });
}; // delayCall

Usage:

$("#username").on("keyup",function(){
    delayCall($(this),500,fieldKeyup);
});
share|improve this answer

Take a look at the autocomplete plugin. I know that it allows you to specify a delay or a minimum number of characters. Even if you don't end up using the plugin, looking through the code will give you some ideas on how to implement it yourself.

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This is a solution along the lines of CMS's, but solves a few key issues for me:

  • Supports multiple inputs, delays can run concurrently.
  • Ignores key events that didn't changed the value (like Ctrl, Alt+Tab).
  • Solves a race condition (when the callback is executed and the value already changed).
var delay = (function() {
    var timer = {}
      , values = {}
    return function(el) {
        var id = el.form.id + '.' + el.name
        return {
            enqueue: function(ms, cb) {
                if (values[id] == el.value) return
                if (!el.value) return
                var original = values[id] = el.value
                clearTimeout(timer[id])
                timer[id] = setTimeout(function() {
                    if (original != el.value) return // solves race condition
                    cb.apply(el)
                }, ms)
            }
        }
    }
}())

Usage:

signup.key.addEventListener('keyup', function() {
    delay(this).enqueue(300, function() {
        console.log(this.value)
    })
})

The code is written in a style I enjoy, you may need to add a bunch of semicolons.

Things to keep in mind:

  • A unique id is generated based on the form id and input name, so they must be defined and unique, or you could adjust it to your situation.
  • delay returns an object that's easy to extend for your own needs.
  • The original element used for delay is bound to the callback, so this works as expected (like in the example).
  • Empty value is ignored in the second validation.
  • Watch out for enqueue, it expects milliseconds first, I prefer that, but you may want to switch the parameters to match setTimeout.

The solution I use adds another level of complexity, allowing you to cancel execution, for example, but this is a good base to build on.

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var globalTimeout = null;  
$('#search').keyup(function(){
  if(globalTimeout != null) clearTimeout(globalTimeout);  
  globalTimeout =setTimeout(SearchFunc,200);  
});
function SearchFunc(){  
  globalTimeout = null;  
  console.log('Search: '+$('#search').val());
  //ajax code
};
share|improve this answer

Well, i also made a piece of code for limit high frequency ajax request cause by Keyup / Keydown. Check this out:

https://github.com/raincious/jQueue

Do your query like this:

var q = new jQueue(function(type, name, callback) {
    return $.post("/api/account/user_existed/", {Method: type, Value: name}).done(callback);
}, 'Flush', 1500); // Make sure use Flush mode.

And bind event like this:

$('#field-username').keyup(function() {
    q.run('Username', this.val(), function() { /* calling back */ });
});
share|improve this answer

This is the solution i work with. It will delay the execution on ANY function you want. It can be the keydown search query, maybe the quick click on previous or next buttons ( that would otherwise send multiple request if quickly clicked continuously , and be not used after all). This uses a global object that stores each execution time, and compares it with the most current request.

function delay_method(label,callback){
    if(typeof window.delayed_methods=="undefined"){window.delayed_methods={};}  
    delayed_methods[label]=Date.now();
    var t=delayed_methods[label];
    setTimeout(function(){ if(delayed_methods[label]!=t){return;}else{  callback();}}, 500);
  }

You can set your own delay time. And send your function arguments in a "closure fashion".

Example of a function:

function send_ajax(id){console.log(id);}

like: delay_method("check date", function(){ send_ajax(2);});

Every request that uses the label "check date" will only be triggered if no other request is made in the 500 miliseconds timeframe.

Label independency (calling the same target function) but run both:

delay_method("check date parallel", function(){send_ajax(2);});
delay_method("check date", function(){send_ajax(2);});

Results in calling the same function but delay them independently because of their labels being different

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