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I have 2 processes (an 'ls' process and a 'grep'). I'm using pipe to communicate between both of them. But the grep process is unable to read from the pipe. Could you help me figure out why so?

Here is my code

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <errno.h>
int pipe_fd[2];

int main()
{
    pid_t p1,p2;
    char *prog1_argv[4];
    char *prog2_argv[2];
    /* Build argument list */
    prog1_argv[0] = "ls";
    prog1_argv[1] = "-l";
    prog1_argv[2] = "/";
    prog1_argv[3] = NULL;
    prog2_argv[0] = "grep";
    prog2_argv[1] = "s";
    prog2_argv[1] = NULL;
    if (pipe(pipe_fd) < 0)
    {
        printf ("pipe failed");
    }
    p1 = fork();
    if(p1 == 0)
    {
        printf("in child\n");
        close(pipe_fd[0]);
        if(dup2(pipe_fd[1],1)<0)
        {
            printf("dup failed:%d\n",errno);
        }
        close(pipe_fd[1]);
        if(execvp (prog1_argv[0], prog1_argv)<0)
            printf("exec failed");
    }
    if(p1>0)
    {
        printf("im in parent\n");
        waitpid(p1,NULL,0);
        printf("parent: child exited. Now test the pipe\n");
        close(pipe_fd[1]);
        if(dup2(pipe_fd[0],0)<0)
        {
            printf("dup failed:%d\n",errno);
        }
        close(pipe_fd[0]);

        if(execvp (prog2_argv[0], prog2_argv)<0)
            printf("exec failed");

    }

}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Fundamentally, you should not be waiting for the ls to die before running the grep.

The ls command might generate so much data that it can't all be stored in the pipe, so the ls command will block until the other process reads from the pipe, but the other process is waiting for ls to complete before it tries to read anything from the pipe. This is a deadlock.

Also, by waiting like that, you enforce serial execution, which throws away the benefits of multiple cores.

There are a number of minor improvements you should make. There are various points at which you report errors. Errors should be reported on the standard error stream (stderr), not on stdout. You should also ensure the program does not continue after at least some of those errors.

You don't have to test the return value from any of the exec*() system calls. If the function returns, it failed. And again, you should ensure that the process exits after that. In this program, it doesn't matter that the child continues; in many programs, not exiting would lead to chaos (two processes trying to read standard input at the same time, for example).

There's no need for pipe_fd to be a global variable. Do make sure all your messages end with a newline, please. You didn't include <sys/wait.h> so you were working without a prototype in scope for the waitpid() function — that's generally a bad idea. You should set your compiler to fussy so it demands that every function has a prototype in scope before it is used or defined. You can initialize the argument lists in the definitions:

char *prog1_argv[] = { "ls", "-l", "/", NULL };
char *prog2_argv[] = { "grep", "s", NULL };

This has the crucial beneficial side-effect of not zapping prog_argv2[1] with a NULL pointer (as noted by Matthias in his answer. I also removed the sizes of the arrays; the second one was dimensioned at 2 and needed to be 3, but when you initialize like this, the compiler does the counting.

One thing you did correctly that was important to do correctly is ensure that the pipe file descriptors were all closed.

This works correctly for me:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <errno.h>

int main(void)
{
    pid_t p1;
    int pipe_fd[2];
    char *prog1_argv[] = { "ls", "-l", "/", NULL };
    char *prog2_argv[] = { "grep", "s", 0 };
    if (pipe(pipe_fd) < 0)
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "pipe failed:%d\n", errno);
        exit(1);
    }
    p1 = fork();
    if (p1 == 0)
    {
        printf("In child\n");
        close(pipe_fd[0]);
        if (dup2(pipe_fd[1], 1) < 0)
        {
            fprintf(stderr, "dup failed:%d\n", errno);
            exit(1);
        }
        close(pipe_fd[1]);
        execvp(prog1_argv[0], prog1_argv);
        fprintf(stderr, "exec failed:%d\n", errno);
        exit(1);
    }
    if (p1 > 0)
    {
        printf("In parent\n");
        close(pipe_fd[1]);
        if (dup2(pipe_fd[0], 0) < 0)
        {
            fprintf(stderr, "dup failed:%d\n", errno);
            exit(1);
        }
        close(pipe_fd[0]);

        execvp(prog2_argv[0], prog2_argv);
        fprintf(stderr, "exec failed:%d\n", errno);
        exit(1);
    }
    fprintf(stderr, "Fork failed:%d\n", errno);
    return(1);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hi jonathan. with this code i wanted to check if the first process is to be active for the second process to read from the pipe. Or , is it possible for the first process to write into the 'read end' of the second process and die.And later it is possible possible for the second process to read from the pipe (even without process 1 being active) –  Django Sep 30 '13 at 13:36
    
I'm just understanding how pipe works in linux. for example when one issues a shell script as follows 'ls -l | more' ,i would like to know what happens internally. Is ls executed completely, before more is executed? –  Django Sep 30 '13 at 13:39
    
Answer to comment 1: you don't need to do any such checking, and it's generally counter-productive to try doing it. The first process (ls) writes to the write end of the pipe, so the data is available to the second process (grep) on the read end of the pipe. If the pipe fills (the capacity varies, but can be 5-8 KiB only), then the first process will block until the pipe is emptied (hence the deadlock I mentioned). Pipelines can convey megabytes of data, so the two processes must be running concurrently. If ls dies after writing to the pipe, the data is still there to be read by grep. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 30 '13 at 13:47
    
Answer to comment 2: As indicated in my answer to comment 1 (and the main answer), the processes on either end of a pipeline are running concurrently. This is good. Imagine a find / -print | grep s | more command. There could be many megabytes of data to be shown, but each of the pipes has a capacity of a few KiB. The processes must run concurrently for it to have a chance of working. If they ran sequentially, the find would be blocked waiting for the grep, while the grep would be unstarted because the find hadn't completed. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 30 '13 at 13:50
    
Well this answers a lot of my questions! thanks a lot jonathan and matthias!! –  Django Sep 30 '13 at 14:00
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You override your grep's argument. Try:

int main()
{
  pid_t p1,p2;
  char *prog1_argv[4];
  char *prog2_argv[3];
  /* Build argument list */
  prog1_argv[0] = "ls";
  prog1_argv[1] = "-l";
  prog1_argv[2] = "/";
  prog1_argv[3] = NULL;
  prog2_argv[0] = "grep";
  prog2_argv[1] = "s";
  prog2_argv[2] = NULL;
  // ...
share|improve this answer
    
Ah! I missed the obvious!! But there's a small issue too. I want to display the output of the second process into the terminal. But that is not happening. I haven't changed the output terminal of the process('grep') to anything else. But the output simply doesn't come to the terminal. Do you know what might be the problem? –  Django Sep 30 '13 at 13:30
    
After the modification, it works fine for me. Did you also change the size of prog2_argv? –  Matthias Sep 30 '13 at 13:42
    
Hey Mattias, it works for me now!! thanks a lot!!! :) –  Django Sep 30 '13 at 13:47
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