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I am trying to show a lense like circle on mouseover. i did some coding for it but still not reached a perfect result. any one have any idea how to do this then let me know ? here is my code //html

<div class="thumbnails">
    <div class="thumbnail">
    <img src="http://www.niams.nih.gov/health_info/Sprains_Strains/images/Fig3_Thumb.gif" />
</div>
<div class="thumbnail">
    <img src="http://www.niams.nih.gov/health_info/Sprains_Strains/images/Fig3_Thumb.gif" />
</div>
<div class="thumbnail">
    <img src="http://www.niams.nih.gov/health_info/Sprains_Strains/images/Fig3_Thumb.gif" />
</div>
</div>

//Css

.thumbnails {
    padding: 35px;
}
.thumbnail {
    float:left;
    position:relative;
    width: 70px;
    margin-right: 10px;
}
.thumbnail img{
    /* ... */
    width:70px;
    height:50px;
}    

.thumbnail:hover img {
    position:relative;
    top:-25px;
    left:-35px;
    width:140px;
    height:140px;
    display:block;
    z-index:999;
    border-radius:75px;
    border:5px solid gray;
}

Here is My Fiddle Code

share|improve this question
3  
Looks like it works to me. What is the problem? –  Robert Harvey Sep 30 '13 at 13:45
    
its not a clear lense look its just a circle .i want to give lense look to it –  ammu Sep 30 '13 at 13:47
    
Same here, looks like it's working. –  Grevling Sep 30 '13 at 13:48
1  
Define "lens look". –  j08691 Sep 30 '13 at 13:48
    
Absolutely , no problem with your stuff. Unless and until you show us the visual depiction of what you want lens to look like, don't think we can do anything . –  The Dark Knight Sep 30 '13 at 13:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You would have to overlay it with a gradient or image. See this fiddle for a working example: http://jsfiddle.net/V4YaQ/119/

Basically I wrapped the image and added an overlay:

<div class="thumbnail">
   <div class="image-container">
      <div class="overlay">&nbsp;</div>
      <img src="http://cdn1.bigcommerce.com/server4800/10d13/products/1134/images/4290/pw72_1__15735.1346792984.320.320.jpg" />
   </div>          
</div>

Then on the CSS I did this:

.thumbnail:hover .image-container {
  position:relative;    
  top:-25px;
  left:-35px;
  width:140px;
  height:140px;    
  z-index:999;    
  border-radius:75px;
  border:1px solid white;  
  overflow: hidden;
  box-shadow: 2px 2px 4px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.5);
}

.thumbnail:hover img {
  position:relative;
  width:140px;
  height:140px;
  display:block;
}

.thumbnail .overlay {
  position: absolute;
  width: 100%;
  height: 100%;
  background: radial-gradient(at 25% 25%, rgba(255, 255, 255, 1) 0%, rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.0) 35%, rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.5) 100%);
  display: none;
}

.thumbnail:hover .overlay {
  display: block;  
  z-index: 1000;
}

As you will notice, I also changed the border and added a drop shadow, for the effect.

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To achieve the "magnify glass" effect you can follow one of this two codepens.

http://codepen.io/bekerov/pen/kgyvL

http://codepen.io/TheHeat/pen/gdxFG

Or if you dont want the mouse effect, here is your fiddle with the "glass" effect.

http://jsfiddle.net/V4YaQ/121/

The effect is done with box-shadow only.

box-shadow:
    0 0 0 7px rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.85),
    0 0 7px 7px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.25), 
    inset 0 0 40px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.25);
share|improve this answer

Sure thing. I did something like this a year ago. I really enjoyed the process to be honest. There's still a problem with the way that the edges of the image are handled due to the way that I've handled getting data from the edges. The canvas element is implemented differently in different browsers and gives a different result. The client didn't want this kind of a solution, so development stopped.

enter image description here

There's a live demo here: http://jsfiddle.net/enhzflep/xsEVb/

You can extract the svg resource, by copying the text in

var svgBase64Str = xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

and unencoding it with an online tool. There's notes for the tutorial I followed to create it there too.

UPDATE EDIT: I remembered that years ago I saw some code that would simulate a magnifying glass floating above a texture. The key difference being that a mag-glass is curved and thus has a varying degree of image displacement across its surface. The first image just shows a constant level of magnification - parallel lines remain parallel.

I just found some code the other day for a more authentic lens effect. It's still not ideal, since it assumes a glass sphere that is intersected with the viewing-plane - not exactly an accurate physical model. It wouldn't be that hard to modify the equation used to calculate the displacement for each pixel. This looks and works well enough for me - even if it does require some extra thinking when playing with the two variables - lens_mag and lens_width.

enter image description here

You can find the code here: http://jsfiddle.net/enhzflep/Ytq2M/

It came from a port of the LENS code found in this archive: http://internode.dl.sourceforge.net/project/demo-effects/The_Demo_Effects_Collection/0.7.2/The_Demo_Effects_Collection-0.7.2.tar.gz

Which I found via this page: http://demo-effects.sourceforge.net/

share|improve this answer
    
nice one , really a smart work. –  ammu Sep 30 '13 at 14:47
1  
@ammu - thanks, I enjoyed figuring it out. Just found an old favourite. I see your question has been solved, thought you may enjoy this one too. Roll the mouse wheel to change the lens size. :) –  enhzflep Oct 17 '13 at 4:41

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