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I have data in the text file like val1,val2 with multiple lines and I want to change it to 1,val1,val2,0,0,1

I tried with print statement in awk(solaris) to add constants by it didn't work.

What is the correct way to do it ?


(From the comments) This is what I tried

awk -F, '{print "%s","1,"$1","$2"0,0,1"}' test.txt 
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1  
Can you show what you tried? Maybe you were nearly there. –  fedorqui Sep 30 '13 at 14:50
    
awk -F, '{print "%s","1,"$1","$2"0,0,1"}' test.txt –  Tejas Joshi Sep 30 '13 at 14:52
    
@TejasJoshi Try removing "%s", –  devnull Sep 30 '13 at 14:54
    
please edit your question to include your sample code. Otherwise we'll get a long discussion running in comments of information that should be in the main body of the question. Good luck. –  shellter Sep 30 '13 at 14:54
1  
There are multiple awk version on Solaris. Unfortunately the default one is /usr/bin/awk and that is old, broken awk which must never be used so that will be causing you problems if you are trying to use it. Use /usr/xpg4/bin/awk or nawk instead on Solaris (or, even better, install gawk). –  Ed Morton Sep 30 '13 at 15:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Based on the command you posted, a little change makes it:

$ awk -F, 'BEGIN{OFS=FS} {print 1,$1,$2,0,0,1}' file
1,val1,val2,0,0,1

OR using printf (I prefer print):

$ awk -F, '{printf "1,%s,%s,0,0,1", $1, $2}' file
1,val1,val2,0,0,1
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To prepend every line with the constant 1 and append with 0,0,1 simply do:

$ awk '{print 1,$0,0,0,1}' OFS=, file
1,val1,val2,0,0,1

A idiomatic way would be:

$ awk '$0="1,"$0",0,0,1"' file
1,val1,val2,0,0,1
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Using sed:

sed 's/.*/1,&,0,0,1/' inputfile

Example:

$ echo val1,val2 | sed 's/.*/1,&,0,0,1/'
1,val1,val2,0,0,1
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