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I see this question asked many times about the ASP.NET style of application settings where the loading is done and then the code contains calls to ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["MySettingHere"] ..

..but my WinForms app doesnt use this method. Instead it uses the Project Settings route (i.e. I call Properties.Settings.Default.MySettingName to get my value, and I edit my settings by getting properties on the project and choosing the Settings tab) App.config as a file is present in the root of the project/solution, but there is also Settings.settings and Settings.Designer.cs and I think these are the ones used and transformed into compiled code that gets the data

Essentially Visual Studio provides a type safe wrapper around the settings load/save/value getting process, and what I'd like to do is supply a path of the settings file to load rather than have it stuck at taking the default MyExeName.config file from the application directory

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Perhaps I am missing something in your question, but you can absolutely use Config Manager in your winforms app. –  paqogomez Sep 30 '13 at 16:06
    
    
As far as having multiple config files, you can have your app.config load as many config files as you want and reference them all through Config Manager. This answer shows how to set that up. –  paqogomez Sep 30 '13 at 16:14
    
Hi paqgomez.. Thanks for the pointer, but none of my code uses ConfigurationManager directly, it uses Project Settings (which is a visual designer wrapper for CM, i think) in the same way you COULD write all the code to lay out a winforms Form yourself, but you use the visual designer.. This is the same thing, but for settings. –  Caius Jard Sep 30 '13 at 16:35
    
I certainly know I COULD have used Config Manager, but when I wite a winforms app, and I want a setting, I go to Project menu.. Properties.. Settings tab, "this project does not contain a settings file, click here to create one", so i click there.. Add my first setting. It's like Resources, but for Settings. Once defined I can save the settings and access them by calling MyProjectNamespace.Properties.Settings.Default.WindowHeight or whatever, as a type safe property, not ConfigManager.AppSettings["WindowHeight"] which I then have to parse. I want to know how to load another Settings file –  Caius Jard Sep 30 '13 at 16:38

2 Answers 2

I assume you want to load custom configuration file from desired location rather than loading the default config, then try this,

NOTE : You can't have more than one App.config in a project.The app will use the config file named YourExcecutable.exe.config which is by default the file App.config. But you can have multipe configuration files and load then as you need using code. But you can't keep all of them loaded at the same time. you can only switch between the files as you need.

System.Configuration.ConfigurationFileMap fileMap = new ConfigurationFileMap("path to new file"); 
System.Configuration.Configuration configuration = System.Configuration.ConfigurationManager.OpenMappedMachineConfiguration(fileMap);

OR

AppDomain.CurrentDomain.SetData("APP_CONFIG_FILE", @"Config file path");
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Alas, I didn't get any success with either of these methods. If I call AppDomain...SetData(...) and then call MyNamespace.Properties.Settings.Default.Reload() it only loads the old values. If I go the System.Configuration.* route, then the configuration variable does have settings in, but not in the form that Proeprties.Settings.Default.NAMED_PROPERTY_HERE uses –  Caius Jard Oct 2 '13 at 8:44

The only solution I have found so far is rather a poor man's solve..

When we use the Settings tab inside a project's properties, the solution will gain a Settings.Settings, Settings.Designer.cs under the project's Properties node and possibly also an app.config in the root of the project. Edits to these files directly seem to be copied/updated /synchronised by VS itself. It also maintains some code in the background to ensure data-typed access to these settings. Likely it's based on Configmanager.AppSetings["propertyName"] but because VS is used to set up the property, and you tell it it's an int (or whatever) then VS can write wrapper code that exposes a namespace/class/member chain of ProjectNamespace.Properties.Settings.Default.PROPERTYNAME

Seemingly this code relies on the settingsfile being called THE_EXE_NAME.exe.config and being stored alongside the EXE itself.. ..so I just take the the settings file that I want to use, copy it over the top of the one stored on disk, and call ProjectNamespace.Properties.Settings.Default.Reload() which does reload the values I want to use out of the new file. I can think of countless reasons why this isn't ideal but it's all I've been able to come up with so far

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