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#include <stdio.h>
int main()
{
    int x = 1, y = 1;
    for(;y;printf("%d%d\n",x,y))
        y = x++ <= 5;
    return 0;
}

I'm confused about the structure of the for construct in the code snippet above. It's taken form a book on programming in C.

The correct output is the following according to the book.

2 1
3 1
4 1
5 1
6 1
7 0

Can someone explain how and why this is the output?

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closed as off-topic by Mike Christensen, Scott Mermelstein, P0W, Shafik Yaghmour, ugoren Sep 30 '13 at 19:20

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist" – Scott Mermelstein, P0W, ugoren
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
Tip:ideone.com – P0W Sep 30 '13 at 16:07
3  
execute it and see for yourself. – karthikr Sep 30 '13 at 16:07
2  
Hint: Print the value of x and y as long as y is true.. – karthikr Sep 30 '13 at 16:08
    
There are many online compilers available if you don't have a compiler available. Most of them support C. – Shafik Yaghmour Sep 30 '13 at 16:08
2  
To all downvoters : read the question. The title might be poorly chosen, but the question in the description is legitimate. – franssu Sep 30 '13 at 16:20

To understand what the for loop does, here is the equivalent while loop:

while (y) {
    y = x++ <= 5;
    printf("%d%d\n",x,y);
}

The transformation goes like this:

for (INIT; COND; INC) {
  BODY;
}

->

INIT;
while (COND) {
  BODY;
  INC;
}

Note that in C the expression y is equivalent to y != 0 if y is an int.

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The construct becomes easy to understand if you expand it. I reckon the trick here is in understanding that the suffix incrementation of x happens after the comparison.

Another concept shown in your example is the fact that in C all comparisons return a boolean value (1 for true and 0 for false).

#include <stdio.h>
int main()
{
    int x = 1, y = 1;

    printf("first version:\n");
    for(;y;printf("%d%d\n",x,y))
        y = x++ <= 5;
    printf("second version:\n");
    x = 1;
    y = 1;

    while (y != 0)
     {
        if (x <= 5)
          y = 1;
        else
          y = 0;
        x = x + 1;
        printf ("%d%d\n",x,y);
     }
    return 0;
}

I hope this answers your question.

share|improve this answer
    
Also, the for construct is equivalent to a do ... while and the loop is always executed at least once. Wrong. Please explain me what happens if the condition fails on the first iteration. Say, in the above code int x = 1, y = 0; – Pepperboy Sep 30 '13 at 18:53
    
you're right, my bad. I'm editing the post. Thank you for the correction. – krouis Oct 1 '13 at 6:59

To summarize how for loop works in C:

for(initialization; condition; expression) {
     //statements
}

1. initialization is executed before the first evaluation of the condition
2. expression is evaluated after every iteration of the loop.
3. The loop will only be entered when the condition is true.

For your specific code, please note that in the line,

y = x++ <= 5;

' x ' is compared with the number 5 before its value is incremented. For example, on the 5th iteration x=5 is checked against (<=5), then it is incremented to 6. After that the statement

printf("%d%d\n",x,y)

is executed printing "61".

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