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If I try to do this - my call to oldList.Except( newList ) seems to return all items - no comparison is working.

   List<ControlAndTopLevelControlPair> oldOnly = oldList.Except( newList ).ToList();

   public class ControlAndTopLevelControlPair : IEqualityComparer<ControlAndTopLevelControlPair>
   {
      public int CONTROLOI { get; set; }
      public int VIEWCONTROL_OI { get; set; }
      public bool Equals( ControlAndTopLevelControlPair x, ControlAndTopLevelControlPair y )
      {
         return x.CONTROLOI.Equals( y.CONTROLOI ) && x.VIEWCONTROL_OI.Equals( y.VIEWCONTROL_OI );
      }

      public int GetHashCode( ControlAndTopLevelControlPair obj )
      {
         return obj.CONTROLOI.GetHashCode( ) ^ obj.VIEWCONTROL_OI.GetHashCode( );
      }

But if I define a custom comparer then the following works:

List<ControlAndTopLevelControlPair> oldOnly = oldList.Except( newList, new ControlAndTopLevelControlPairComparer() ).ToList( );

   public class ControlAndTopLevelControlPairComparer : IEqualityComparer<ControlAndTopLevelControlPair>
   {
      public bool Equals( ControlAndTopLevelControlPair x, ControlAndTopLevelControlPair y )
      {
         return x.CONTROLOI.Equals( y.CONTROLOI ) && x.VIEWCONTROL_OI.Equals( y.VIEWCONTROL_OI );
      }

      public int GetHashCode( ControlAndTopLevelControlPair obj )
      {
         return obj.CONTROLOI.GetHashCode() ^ obj.VIEWCONTROL_OI.GetHashCode();
      }
   }
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The IEqualityComparer is the interface in which you define an object who's sole job is to compare some other objects.

You use the IEquatable object to define how an object compares itself for equality with another object. If you do that, then you don't need to create a new comparer object and pass it into Except.

Ensure that whenever you implement IEquatble that you override the object's GetHashCode method as well.

public class ControlAndTopLevelControlPair : IEquatable<ControlAndTopLevelControlPair>
{
    public int CONTROLOI { get; set; }
    public int VIEWCONTROL_OI { get; set; }
    public bool Equals(ControlAndTopLevelControlPair other)
    {
        if (other == null) return false;
        return CONTROLOI.Equals(other.CONTROLOI)
            && VIEWCONTROL_OI.Equals(other.VIEWCONTROL_OI);
    }
    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        return Equals(obj as ControlAndTopLevelControlPair);
    }
    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        return CONTROLOI.GetHashCode() ^ VIEWCONTROL_OI.GetHashCode();
    }
}

If you're going to override GetHashCode you should also override the object's Equals method so that the two definitions of equality stay in sync.

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When you don't specify a Comparer, it will default to calls to GetHashCode and Equals(object), which you don't implement.

If you put a breakpoint in your methods, you'll see they're never called. If you do the same with your implementations of GetHashCode() and Equals(object), you'll see those are called.

public class ControlAndTopLevelControlPair 
{
  public int CONTROLOI { get; set; }
  public int VIEWCONTROL_OI { get; set; }

  public override int GetHashCode() {  return CONTROLOI ^ VIEWCONTROL_OI; }
  public override bool Equals (object other) 
  {
     // your implementation
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Another product of copying and pasting from the OP's code? the IEqualityComparer... is not needed otherwise you have to add code implementing that interface. –  King King Sep 30 '13 at 16:39
    
Thanks. upvoted. –  Derek Sep 30 '13 at 16:54

You need to override the Equals and GetHashCode in the first case.

public class ControlAndTopLevelControlPair {
  public int CONTROLOI { get; set; }
  public int VIEWCONTROL_OI { get; set; }
  public override bool Equals(object x)
  {
     ControlAndTopLevelControlPair c = x as ControlAndTopLevelControlPair;
     if(c == null) return false;
     return c.CONTROLOI.Equals(CONTROLOI) && c.VIEWCONTROL_OI.Equals(VIEWCONTROL_OI);
  }

  public override int GetHashCode()
  {
     return CONTROLOI.GetHashCode( ) ^ VIEWCONTROL_OI.GetHashCode( );
  }
}

Note the override keywords, the class doesn't need to implement IEqualityComparer

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1  
Thanks. upvoted. –  Derek Sep 30 '13 at 16:54

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