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I thought I had a good way of determining which drives were internal and which were external (USB). Until I ran across this :

/var/log/messages*

    Sep 24 03:40:02 myHostName kernel: sd 0:0:0:0: [sda] 3907029164 512-byte logical blocks: (2.00 TB/1.81 TiB)
    Sep 24 03:40:02 myHostName kernel: sd 1:0:0:0: [sdb] 976773168 512-byte logical blocks: (500 GB/465 GiB)
    Jul 21 14:57:01 myHostName kernel: sd 6:0:0:0: [sdb] 3907029164 512-byte logical blocks: (2.00 TB/1.81 TiB)
    Jul 22 06:45:39 myHostName kernel: sd 1:0:0:0: [sdb] 976773168 512-byte logical blocks: (500 GB/465 GiB)
    Jul 22 15:06:30 myHostName kernel: sd 0:0:0:0: [sda] 3907029164 512-byte logical blocks: (2.00 TB/1.81 TiB)
    Jul 22 15:06:30 myHostName kernel: sd 1:0:0:0: [sdb] 976773168 512-byte logical blocks: (500 GB/465 GiB)
    Jul 25 15:13:06 myHostName kernel: sd 7:0:0:0: [sdc] 3907029164 512-byte logical blocks: (2.00 TB/1.81 TiB)
    Jul 26 15:19:39 myHostName kernel: sd 0:0:0:0: [sda] 3907029164 512-byte logical blocks: (2.00 TB/1.81 TiB)
    Jul 26 15:19:39 myHostName kernel: sd 1:0:0:0: [sdb] 976773168 512-byte logical blocks: (500 GB/465 GiB)
    Jul 26 15:23:28 myHostName kernel: sd 0:0:0:0: [sda] 976773168 512-byte logical blocks: (500 GB/465 GiB)

SDA and SDB drives on this system swap from internal to external! Anybody know how I can identify which devices are internal and which are external in Linux? I am in need of looking at HISTORY, so I really need to be able to look back at previously installed devices. My old method was to look at everything that is "sdb-sdX" ignoring sda. That is flawed on the machine above. I don't even know how it's doing this. Always thought SDA was the first internal device.

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2 Answers 2

I use this to identify if the drive is ejectable(USB):-

diskutil info /dev/disk[n|s{n}] | grep Ejectable

Disk Utility gives you the serial numbers for all your disks.

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Don't think it will work for me... I need to see history. –  Mike Q Oct 1 '13 at 14:25
    
Also diskutil isn't on platforms. Thanks for the help though. Greatly appreciated. –  Mike Q Oct 3 '13 at 0:05
up vote 0 down vote accepted

on my RHEL6 system I was able to do the following queries to get the output I was looking for:

cat /var/log/messages* | egrep -i 'usb [0-9]-|mounted|logical blocks' > ${USBDATA}
cat ${USBDATA} | grep "New USB device found" > ${NewUSBDev}


while read line; do

    MONTH="`echo ${line} | awk '{print $1}'`" ;  # -- Jul
    DAY="`echo ${line} | awk '{print $2}'`" # -- day_
    HOUR="`echo ${line} | awk '{print $3}' | cut -d':' -f1`:" # -- hour:
    MIN="`echo ${line} | awk '{print $3}' | cut -d':' -f2`:" # -- hour:

    # -- echo "M:[$MONTH]  D:[$DAY]  H:[${HOUR}${MIN}]"

    cat ${USBDATA} | grep ${MONTH} | grep "${DAY} ${HOUR}${MIN}" > ${CHUNK}

    awk '/New USB device found/{p++}p==1' ${CHUNK} > ${TMPFILE}
    cp ${TMPFILE} ${CHUNK}

    if [ "$(cat $CHUNK| egrep 'MiB|GiB|TiB')" ] && ! [ "$(cat $CHUNK | grep 'Mounted root filesystem')" ] ;then
        # -- cat ${CHUNK}
        STR="$(less ${CHUNK}|grep 'idProduct' | head -1 | awk '{print $1" "$2" "$3" "$12" "$13}')"
        STR="$STR $(less ${CHUNK}|grep 'Product:' | awk '{print ", "$9" "$10" "$11}')"
        STR="$STR $(less ${CHUNK}|grep 'Manufacturer:' | awk '{print ", "$9" "$10" "$11}')"
        STR="$STR $(less ${CHUNK}|grep 'SerialNumber:' | awk '{print ", "$9}')"
        STR="$STR $(less ${CHUNK}|grep 'logical blocks:' | head -1 | awk '{print ", "$13" "$14" "$15" "}')"
        echo "${STR}"
        echo "${STR}" >> ${DEVICES}
    fi

    [ -f ${CHUNK} ] && rm ${CHUNK}

done < ${NewUSBDev}
echo "----------------------------------------------"
cat ${DEVICES} | sort -M -k 2 > ${SORTEDDEV}
cat ${SORTEDDEV}

Basically, it's a little ugly but it searches for all of the "New USB device found" and makes a list of the lines that contain that. Then pulls out everything that matches that time stamp. Then pulls out everything before "New USB device found" and everything after a second match on "New USB device found".

Sample ${CHUNK} of data would look like this:

    Sep 30 09:55:10 oc7446274465 kernel: usb 2-1: New USB device found, idVendor=1058, idProduct=071a
    Sep 30 09:55:10 oc7446274465 kernel: usb 2-1: New USB device strings: Mfr=1, Product=2, SerialNumber=3
    Sep 30 09:55:10 oc7446274465 kernel: usb 2-1: Product: My Passport 071A
    Sep 30 09:55:10 oc7446274465 kernel: usb 2-1: Manufacturer: Western Digital
    Sep 30 09:55:10 oc7446274465 kernel: usb 2-1: SerialNumber: 575846314136304130353235
    Sep 30 09:55:10 oc7446274465 kernel: usb 2-1: configuration #1 chosen from 1 choice
    Sep 30 09:55:22 oc7446274465 kernel: sd 5:0:0:0: [sdb] 1465092096 512-byte logical blocks: (750 GB/698 GiB)

Puts this data into a temp file and then greps out the important bits. This can be improved upon for sure but it works for the moment (grepping part not included in above code):

Sample output:

    Sep 10 16:19:14 idVendor=8564, idProduct=1000 , Mass Storage Device , JetFlash   , 2978449637 , (31.6 GB/29.4 GiB) 
    Sep 14 15:15:04 idVendor=054c, idProduct=0544 , DSC-HX9V   , Sony   , D89BE0866 , (20.0 MB/19.1 MiB) 
    Sep 17 19:38:04 idVendor=054c, idProduct=0544 , DSC-HX9V   , Sony   , D89BE0866 , (31.9 GB/29.7 GiB) 
    Sep 19 05:23:07 idVendor=054c, idProduct=0544 , DSC-HX9V   , Sony   , D89BE0866 , (31.9 GB/29.7 GiB) 
    Sep 30 09:55:10 idVendor=1058, idProduct=071a , My Passport 071A , Western Digital  , 57584631413630XXXXXX235 , (750 GB/698 GiB) 

Hence I get the time, the ID info, product name, serial etc. I should probably include checks for if the data is missing. But you get the point. Thanks for input guys.

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