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I have a table that has values and group ids (simplified example). I need to get the average for each group of the middle 3 values. So, if there are 1, 2, or 3 values it's just the average. But if there are 4 values, it would exclude the highest, 5 values the highest and lowest, etc. I was thinking some sort of window function, but I'm not sure if it's possible.

http://www.sqlfiddle.com/#!11/af5e0/1

For this data:

TEST_ID TEST_VALUE  GROUP_ID
1       5           1
2       10          1
3       15          1
4       25          2
5       35          2
6       5           2
7       15          2
8       25          3
9       45          3
10      55          3
11      15          3
12      5           3
13      25          3
14      45          4

I'd like

GROUP_ID    AVG
1           10
2           15
3           21.6
4           45
share|improve this question
    
Why do you want to do this? Just seems like an odd use requirment. As you scale up the number of rows into the millions, do you still want to average only 3 values? For even number of rows, do you always want to get rid of the highest value first, followed by the lowest? –  Vulcronos Sep 30 '13 at 18:22
    
@Vulcronos, there will be lots and lots of groups, but each group will contain between 0 and 10ish values, with the majority having 3-5 values. The values are results from testing, and the difference between the middle average and the overall average is of interest. –  Barbara Laird Sep 30 '13 at 18:32

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Another option using analytic functions;

SELECT group_id,
       avg( test_value )
FROM (
  select t.*,
         row_number() over (partition by group_id order by test_value ) rn,
         count(*) over (partition by group_id  ) cnt
  from test t
) alias 
where 
   cnt <= 3
   or 
   rn between floor( cnt / 2 )-1 and ceil( cnt/ 2 ) +1
group by group_id
;

Demo --> http://www.sqlfiddle.com/#!11/af5e0/59

share|improve this answer
    
+1 damn, you beat me :) almost the same solution –  Roman Pekar Sep 30 '13 at 18:46
    
This is a thing of beauty! –  Barbara Laird Sep 30 '13 at 18:50
1  
+1 for concise SQL, but -0.5 if I could for providing no explanation with your code. –  IMSoP Sep 30 '13 at 18:55

I'm not familiar with the Postgres syntax on windowed functions, but I was able to solve your problem in SQL Server with this SQL Fiddle. Maybe you'll be able to easily migrate this into Postgres-compatible code. Hope it helps!

A quick primer on how I worked it.

  1. Order the test scores for each group
  2. Get a count of items in each group
  3. Use that as a subquery and select only the middle 3 items (that's the where clause in the outer query)
  4. Get the average for each group

--

select  
  group_id,
  avg(test_value)
from (
  select 
    t.group_id, 
    convert(decimal,t.test_value) as test_value, 
    row_number() over (
      partition by t.group_id
      order by t.test_value
    ) as ord,
    g.gc
  from
    test t
    inner join (
      select group_id, count(*) as gc
      from test
      group by group_id
    ) g
      on t.group_id = g.group_id
  ) a
where
  ord >= case when gc <= 3 then 1 when gc % 2 = 1 then gc / 2 else (gc - 1) / 2 end
  and ord <= case when gc <= 3 then 3 when gc % 2 = 1 then (gc / 2) + 2 else ((gc - 1) / 2) + 2 end
group by
  group_id
share|improve this answer
1  
SQLFiddle supports Postgres as well. –  a_horse_with_no_name Sep 30 '13 at 18:29
    
I know - I'm not familiar with the exact postgres syntaxes/function names that I'm familiar with in SQL Server. If someone knows both and wants to translate, that'd be awesome. –  Derek Kromm Sep 30 '13 at 18:29
3  
I opened your SQL Fiddle, selected PostgreSQL, and built and ran. The only thing that complained was the non-standard CONVERT function; I swapped that for a standard CAST .. AS and it worked fine: sqlfiddle.com/#!12/07bc9/2 –  IMSoP Sep 30 '13 at 18:30
1  
Standard SQL triumphs again. –  Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' Sep 30 '13 at 18:35
    
This works. Thanks! –  Barbara Laird Sep 30 '13 at 18:43
with cte as (
    select
        *,
        row_number() over(partition by group_id order by test_value) as rn,
        count(*) over(partition by group_id) as cnt
    from test
)
select
    group_id, avg(test_value)
from cte
where
    cnt <= 3 or
    (rn >= cnt / 2 - 1 and rn <= cnt / 2 + 1)
group by group_id
order by group_id

sql fiddle demo

in the cte, we need to get count of elements over each group_id by window function + calculate row_number inside each group_id. Then, if this count > 3 then we need to get middle of the group by dividing count by 2 and then get +1 and -1 element. If count <= 3, then we should just take all elements.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for using a CTE, but -0.5 if I could for providing no explanation with your code. –  IMSoP Sep 30 '13 at 18:55
    
@IMSoP actually, I really, really trying to write SQL which don't need comments :) , but added explanation anyway –  Roman Pekar Sep 30 '13 at 19:00
    
Yeah, to be fair, it is pretty readable code :) Although you could have named your CTE better than "cte" :P –  IMSoP Sep 30 '13 at 19:02
    
In quick testing with my actual data, the subquery is a little quicker than the CTE. But, a great solution! –  Barbara Laird Sep 30 '13 at 19:03
    
@IMSoP yeah, i'm still in the middle of developing code convention for such a simple precalculation cte. I don't think that something like 'precalc' or 'aggr' would be better :) I'm open for suggestions BTW :) –  Roman Pekar Sep 30 '13 at 19:04

This works:

SELECT A.group_id, avg(A.test_value) AS avg_mid3 FROM
  (SELECT group_id,
         test_value,
         row_number() OVER (PARTITION BY group_id ORDER BY test_value) AS position
      FROM test) A
JOIN
  (SELECT group_id,
         CASE
           WHEN count(*) < 4 THEN 1
           WHEN count(*) % 2 = 0 THEN (count(*)/2 - 1)
           ELSE (count(*) / 2)
         END AS position_start,
         CASE
           WHEN count(*) < 4 THEN count(*)
           WHEN count(*) % 2 = 0 THEN (count(*)/2 + 1)
           ELSE (count(*) / 2 + 2)
         END AS position_end
         FROM test GROUP BY group_id) B
  ON A.group_id=B.group_id 
  AND A.position >= B.position_start 
  AND A.position <= B.position_end
GROUP BY A.group_id

Fiddle link: http://www.sqlfiddle.com/#!11/af5e0/56

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I couldn't figure out how to oder them from the middle out, but that case statement works. –  Barbara Laird Sep 30 '13 at 18:45

If you need to calculate the average values ​​for groups then you can do this:

SELECT CASE WHEN NUMBER_FIRST_GROUP <> 0 
               THEN SUM_FIRST_GROUP / NUMBER_FIRST_GROUP 
               ELSE NULL
       END AS AVG_FIRST_GROUP,
       CASE WHEN NUMBER_SECOND_GROUP <> 0 
               THEN SUM_SECOND_GROUP / NUMBER_SECOND_GROUP 
               ELSE NULL
       END AS AVG_SECOND_GROUP,
       CASE WHEN NUMBER_THIRD_GROUP <> 0 
               THEN SUM_THIRD_GROUP / NUMBER_THIRD_GROUP 
               ELSE NULL
       END AS AVG_THIRD_GROUP,
       CASE WHEN NUMBER_FOURTH_GROUP <> 0 
               THEN SUM_FOURTH_GROUP / NUMBER_FOURTH_GROUP 
               ELSE NULL
       END AS AVG_FOURTH_GROUP
FROM (
      SELECT 
         SUM(CASE WHEN GROUP_ID = 1 THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) AS NUMBER_FIRST_GROUP,
         SUM(CASE WHEN GROUP_ID = 1 THEN TEST_VALUE ELSE 0 END) AS SUM_FIRST_GROUP,
         SUM(CASE WHEN GROUP_ID = 2 THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) AS NUMBER_SECOND_GROUP,
         SUM(CASE WHEN GROUP_ID = 2 THEN TEST_VALUE ELSE 0 END) AS SUM_SECOND_GROUP,
         SUM(CASE WHEN GROUP_ID = 3 THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) AS NUMBER_THIRD_GROUP,
         SUM(CASE WHEN GROUP_ID = 3 THEN TEST_VALUE ELSE 0 END) AS SUM_THIRD_GROUP,
         SUM(CASE WHEN GROUP_ID = 4 THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) AS NUMBER_FOURTH_GROUP,
         SUM(CASE WHEN GROUP_ID = 4 THEN TEST_VALUE ELSE 0 END) AS SUM_FOURTH_GROUP
     FROM TEST
     ) AS FOO
share|improve this answer
    
This won't work well for me, since I'll have lots and lots of groups. But, thank you. –  Barbara Laird Sep 30 '13 at 18:44

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