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How do I create a histogram of specific information? I have an array of data, for example:

data = [0,1,2,2,2,2,2,3,3,3,3,3,3,4,4,4,4,5,5,6,6,6,7,7,7,7,7,8,9,9,10]

I want to create a histogram based on how many entries there are for 0, 1, 2, and so on. Is there an easy way to do it in Ruby?

Output should be in bins and frequencies in the form of arrays.

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What is the output format you want? –  sawa Sep 30 '13 at 18:29
    
Thank you for the clarification question. –  Whitecat Sep 30 '13 at 18:31
    
When you ask a question, asking for code, you need to show your research and any attempts you made to solve the problem, along with your explanation why they didn't work. –  the Tin Man Sep 30 '13 at 19:45
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closed as unclear what you're asking by sawa, Borodin, EdChum, Stephan Muller, ppeterka Oct 1 '13 at 8:19

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use this gem - http://rubygems.org/gems/histogram

data = [0,1,2,2,2,2,2,3,3,3,3,3,3,4,4,4,4,5,5,6,6,6,7,7,7,7,7,8,9,9,10]
(bins, freqs) = data.histogram 

This will create an array bins containing the bins of histogram and the array freqs containing the frequencies. The gem also supports different binning behaviors and weights/fractions.

Hope this helps.

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Ruby's Array inherits group_by from Enumerable, which does this nicely:

Hash[*data.group_by{ |v| v }.flat_map{ |k, v| [k, v.size] }]

Which returns:

{
     0 => 1,
     1 => 1,
     2 => 5,
     3 => 6,
     4 => 4,
     5 => 2,
     6 => 3,
     7 => 5,
     8 => 1,
     9 => 2,
    10 => 1
}

That's just a nice 'n clean hash. If you want an array of each bin and frequency pair you can shorten it and use:

data = [0,1,2,2,3,3,3,4]
data.group_by{ |v| v }.map{ |k, v| [k, v.size] }
# => [[0, 1], [1, 1], [2, 2], [3, 3], [4, 1]]

Here's what the code and group_by is doing with the smaller dataset:

data.group_by{ |v| v }    
# => {0=>[0], 1=>[1], 2=>[2, 2], 3=>[3, 3, 3], 4=>[4]}

data.group_by{ |v| v }.flat_map{ |k, v| [k, v.size] }  
# => [0, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 4, 1]
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