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I need help on how to define and test three functions on strings. Following these guidelines. This is review for my exam on Wednesday and would really like to have the correct solutions because mine are all coming back with the syntax errors.

I need to come up with the code for all three examples following the requirements listed below.

Without using any string methods only len function and the string operations +, *, indexing slicing, and == for comparing strings or characters.

In the repl function, use the accumulator pattern to build up the new string.

Examples

  1. The ends function takes a string as argument; if the string has two or more characters, it returns a string consisting of the first and last character of the given string; otherwise, it returns the given string.

    >>> ends("ab")
    'ab'
    >>> ends("abc")
    'ac'
    >>> ends("a long sentence")
    'ae'
    >>> ends("")
    ''
    >>> ends("*")
    '*'
    
  2. The butends function takes a string argument; if the string has two or more characters, it returns a string consisting of all but the first and last character of the string; otherwise, it returns the given string.

    >>> butends("abcde")
    'bcd'
    >>> butends("abc")
    'b'
    >>> butends("a long sentence")
    ' long sentenc'
    >>> butends("")
    ''
    >>> butends("a")
    'a'
    
  3. The repl function takes three arguments:

    • old is a single character;
    • new is a string of 0 or more characters;
    • s is any string.

    I know that it returns a new string formed by replacing every occurrence of old in s with new.

    >>> repl('a', 'A', 'fast faces react snappily')
    'fAst fAces reAct snAppily'
    >>> repl('*', '+++', 'a*b = c*d')
    'a+++b = c+++d'
    >>> repl(' ', '\n', 'Practice every day.')
    'Practice\nevery\nday.'
    >>> print(repl(' ', '\n', 'Practice every day.'))
    Practice
    every
    day.
    >>> repl(",", ":", "a,b,cde,fghi")
    'a:b:cde:fghi'
    

what I have so far for part 3 is:

 def repl(old, new, s):
     newStr = ""
     for ch in s:
         if ch != old:
             newStr = newStr + ch
         else:
             newStr = newStr + new
     return newStr

The code listed above does not replace the correct characters I'm not sure where I went wrong.

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closed as off-topic by Mark, Daniel Roseman, chepner, Steven Rumbalski, poke Sep 30 '13 at 19:53

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist" – Mark, Daniel Roseman, chepner, Steven Rumbalski, poke
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
I'm sure more people will say this, but what have you tried? –  Smac89 Sep 30 '13 at 19:36
3  
“[…] would really like to have the correct solutions because mine are all coming back with the syntax errors.” – Show us your solutions and what doesn’t work, and we’ll try to help you fix them. You learn a lot more from having your own ideas corrected, than just getting complete functions. –  poke Sep 30 '13 at 19:38
    
Strikes me that with these constraints, the third question is massively harder than the first two. –  sweeneyrod Sep 30 '13 at 19:39
1  
What have you tried –  heretolearn Sep 30 '13 at 19:39
    
The first two can be easily done with index slicing. For the third one, use your hint :). –  Danstahr Sep 30 '13 at 19:39

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here is one possible solution for the three functions. Note that, as I mentioned above in the comments, you would learn a lot more if you would show us what you have tried and what the problems with it are.

def ends (s):
    if len(s) > 2:
        return s[0] + s[-1]
    else:
        return s

def butends (s):
    if len(s) > 2:
        return s[1:-1]
    else:
        return s

def repl (find, replacement, s):
    newString = ''
    for c in s:
        if c == find:
            newString += replacement
        else:
            newString += c
    return newString
share|improve this answer
    
If str.join is allowed: ''.join(replacement if c == find else c for c in s) –  Steven Rumbalski Sep 30 '13 at 19:57
    
@StevenRumbalski I consider str.join a “string method” though ;) –  poke Sep 30 '13 at 19:58
    
Yep -- that's why I qualified my statement. However, str.join does feel different conceptually than the other string methods. –  Steven Rumbalski Sep 30 '13 at 20:07
    
for the 3rd example I believe there needs to be a return statement at the bottom of it but not sure what exactly needs to be returned –  HTC One Sep 30 '13 at 20:57
    
@HTCOne That’s correct, thanks! Corrected it! –  poke Sep 30 '13 at 20:58
  1. If you can use len() and slicing, it would be best to simply grab the first and last characters and return that.

    def ends(input):
        if len(input) < 2:
            return input
        else:
            return input[0] + input[-1]
    
  2. You can pretty much do the same thing here:

    def butends(input):
        if len(input) < 2:
            return input
        else:
            return input[1:-1]
    
  3. For this one, there's a function in Python called replace, but I'm not sure you can use it.

    def repl(old, new, input):
        return input.replace(old, new)
    

If you can't, then simply loop through the input and replace each character whenever it matches with new.

share|improve this answer
    
then simply loop through the input and replace each character whenever it matches with new. Note that this cannot be done with strings because they are immutable. So OP will have to convert the string to list to do this. Or create a new string –  Smac89 Sep 30 '13 at 19:45
    
^ Smac89 is correct, you will need to create a new string, and copy characters over when they do not match, and replace them when they do. –  eric Sep 30 '13 at 20:05

I like programming assignments:

def ends (s): return s [0] + s [-1] if len (s) > 1 else s
def butends (s): return s [1:-1] if len (s) > 1 else s
def repl (a, b, c, acc = ''): return acc if not c else repl (a, b, c [1:], acc + (b if c [0] == a else c [0] ) )

Not sure what an "accumulator pattern" is, so for the replacement I used a recursive function with an accumulator as known from functional programming.

share|improve this answer
    
ends and butends produce wrong solutions for 'a'. Also: recursive solution for repl? That might be a bit over the top ^^ (I like it anyway :P) –  poke Sep 30 '13 at 19:46
    
Not sure what the accumulator pattern should be in this case either, but the sane (read: non-assignment) way to implement this in python would be simply using replace :) –  l4mpi Sep 30 '13 at 19:47
    
@poke Thank you, I changed my butends. But ends('a') yields a whcih complies with the spec, or doesn't it? –  Hyperboreus Sep 30 '13 at 19:48
    
@poke If the length is less than 2, return the original string unchanged. –  Hyperboreus Sep 30 '13 at 19:49
    
@Hyperboreus Oh, yes, you’re right. I was seeing things… –  poke Sep 30 '13 at 19:51

1)

def ends(s):
    if len(s)<=2: return s
    return s[0]+s[-1]

2)

def butends(s):
    if len(s)<=2: return s
    return s[1:-1]

3)

def repl(s,old,new):
    return s.replace(old,new)
share|improve this answer
1  
Without using any string methods (for the 3rd one) –  Danstahr Sep 30 '13 at 19:41

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