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I am working on a project in which I am supposed to write the ByteArray into the file. And afterwards, read that same file using the C++ program.

And the ByteArray that I am writing into the file is combination of these three ByteArrays-

  • First 2 bytes is my schemaId which I have represented it using short data type.
  • Then next 8 Bytes is my Last Modified Date which I have represented it using long data type.
  • And remaining bytes can be of variable size which is my actual value for my attributes..

After writing resulting ByteArray into the file. Now I need to read that file from C++ program and read the first line which will contain the ByteArray and then split that resulting ByteArray accordingly as I mentioned above such that I am able to extract my schemaId, Last Modified Date and my actual attribute value from it.

I have done all my coding always in Java and I am new to C++... I am able to write a program in C++ to read the file but not sure how should I read that ByteArray in such a way such that I am able to split it as I mentioned above..

Below is my java code which will write resulting ByteArray into a file and the same file now I need to read it back from c++..

public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {

    String os = "whatever os is";
    byte[] avroBinaryValue = os.getBytes();

    long lastModifiedDate = 1379811105109L;
    short schemaId = 32767;

    ByteArrayOutputStream byteOsTest = new ByteArrayOutputStream();
    DataOutputStream outTest = new DataOutputStream(byteOsTest);
    outTest.writeShort(schemaId);
    outTest.writeLong(lastModifiedDate);
    outTest.writeInt(avroBinaryValue.length);
    outTest.write(avroBinaryValue);

    byte[] allWrittenBytesTest = byteOsTest.toByteArray();

    DataInputStream inTest = new DataInputStream(new ByteArrayInputStream(allWrittenBytesTest));

    short schemaIdTest = inTest.readShort();

    long lastModifiedDateTest = inTest.readLong();

    int sizeAvroTest = inTest.readInt();
    byte[] avroBinaryValue1 = new byte[sizeAvroTest];
    inTest.read(avroBinaryValue1, 0, sizeAvroTest);


    System.out.println(schemaIdTest);
    System.out.println(lastModifiedDateTest);
    System.out.println(new String(avroBinaryValue1));

    writeFile(allWrittenBytesTest);
}

    /**
 * Write the file in Java
 * @param byteArray
 */
public static void writeFile(byte[] byteArray) {

    try{
        File file = new File("bytearrayfile");

        FileOutputStream output = new FileOutputStream(file);
        IOUtils.write(byteArray, output);           
    } catch (Exception ex) {
        ex.printStackTrace();
    }
}

Below is my C++ program which is reading the above file (written by Java) and I am not sure what I am supposed to do to split the ByteArrays in such a way so that I can read individual ByteArrays accordingly..

#include "ReadFile.h"
#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

int main () {
    string line;

    std::ifstream myfile("bytearrayfile", std::ios::binary);

    //check to see if the file is opened:
    if (myfile.is_open())
    {
        //while there are still lines in the
        //file, keep reading:
        while (! myfile.eof() )
        {

        // I am not sure what I am supposed to do here?

        }

        //close the stream:
        myfile.close();
    }

    else cout << "Unable to open file";

    return 0;
}

After deserializing the individual ByteArray, I should be able to extract schemaId as 32767, lastModifiedDate as 1379811105109 and my Attribute value as whatever os is from the above C++ program.

I am new to C++ so facing lot of problems on it. Any example basis on my code will help me to understand better.

Can anyone help me with that? Thanks.

Updated:-

Below is my latest code by which I am able to extract schemaId, lastModifiedDate and attributeLength.

But not sure how to extract the actual Attribute Value-

int main() {
    string line;

    std::ifstream myfile("bytearrayfile", std::ios::binary);

    if (myfile.is_open()) {

        uint16_t schemaId;
        uint64_t lastModifiedDate;
        uint32_t attributeLength;

        char buffer[8]; // sized for the biggest read we want to do

        // read two bytes (will be in the wrong order)
        myfile.read(buffer, 2);
        // swap the bytes
        std::swap(buffer[0], buffer[1]);

        // only now convert bytes to an integer
        schemaId = *reinterpret_cast<uint16_t*>(buffer);

        cout<< schemaId <<endl;

        // read eight bytes (will be in the wrong order)
        myfile.read(buffer, 8);
        // swap the bytes
        std::swap(buffer[0], buffer[7]);
        std::swap(buffer[1], buffer[6]);
        std::swap(buffer[2], buffer[5]);
        std::swap(buffer[3], buffer[4]);

        // only now convert bytes to an integer
        lastModifiedDate = *reinterpret_cast<uint64_t*>(buffer);

        cout<< lastModifiedDate <<endl;

        // read 4 bytes (will be in the wrong order)
        myfile.read(buffer, 4);
        // swap the bytes
        std::swap(buffer[0], buffer[3]);
        std::swap(buffer[1], buffer[2]);

        // only now convert bytes to an integer
        attributeLength = *reinterpret_cast<uint32_t*>(buffer);

        cout<< attributeLength <<endl;

      // not sure how to extract the actual attribute value?

        //close the stream:
        myfile.close();
    }

    else
        cout << "Unable to open file";

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
Why have you got while (! myfile.eof() )? Think about what you are doing. You have to read the same things in C++ that you wrote in Java. In Java there are four things written, so in C++ you read the same four things back. There's no loop until the end of file needed. –  john Sep 30 '13 at 19:57
    
Can you specify other format for serialization? For example JSON or BSON? See this thread: stackoverflow.com/questions/245973/whats-the-best-c-json-parser –  yegorich Sep 30 '13 at 19:57
    
@john: I got that while loop as I was following some tutorial on C++ on how to read the file in C++ code.. I am not that good in C++ so that's why I am facing some problem on this.. –  AKIWEB Sep 30 '13 at 19:59
    
@yegorich: I am not using JSON or will be using JSON for some reason in my project.. I will be using the memory solution I believe in my use case.. –  AKIWEB Sep 30 '13 at 20:00
    
@TrekkieTechieT-T That tutorial you read reading was for reading lines from a text file (just look at the comments), you are reading binary data which is a different thing entirely. –  john Sep 30 '13 at 20:03

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In Java your program is

  1. write schema id
  2. write last modifed date
  3. write avro binary data length
  4. write avro binary data

So in C++ your program is

  1. read schema id
  2. read last modified date
  3. read avro binary data length
  4. read avro binary data

There's really very little difference between C++ and Java for this program, so if you can do it in Java you should (with a little research) be able to do it in C++.

Here's a start (item 1)

short schemaId;
myFile.read(reinterpret_cast<char*>(&schemaId), sizeof(short));

reinterpret_cast<char*> is necessary because the read function needs a char* for it's first argument. So if the first argument is anything other than a pointer to char a cast is necessary.

This does assume that sizeof(short) == 2 (always true in Java, usually true in C++), and that there are no endianess issues. Hard to know about this, you'll just have to try it and see.

It is possible that your implementation of Java and C++ will use a different byte order when reading or writing binary integers. This is called endianess. If that's the case then you will have to swap the byte order when you read integers. Here's some code to do this (it's pretty tedious stuff and there may be a cleaner way).

uint16_t schemaId;
uint64_t lastModifiedDate;
uint32_t attributeLength;
char buffer[8]; // sized for the biggest read we want to do

// read two bytes (will be in the wrong order)
myfile.read(buffer, 2);
// swap the bytes
std::swap(buffer[0], buffer[1]);
// only now convert bytes to an integer
schemaId = *reinterpret_cast<uint16_t*>(buffer);

// read eight bytes (will be in the wrong order)
myfile.read(buffer, 8);
// swap the bytes
std::swap(buffer[0], buffer[7]);
std::swap(buffer[1], buffer[6]);
std::swap(buffer[2], buffer[5]);
std::swap(buffer[3], buffer[4]);
// only now convert bytes to an integer
lastModifiedDate = *reinterpret_cast<uint64_t*>(buffer);

etc...

You need to #include <algorithm> to get the std::swap function.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks John.. If I am doing it for the first one like this - short schemaId; myfile.read((&schemaId), sizeof(short)); I always get this error no matching function for call to 'std::basic_ifstream<char>::read(short int*, unsigned int)' Not sure why? –  AKIWEB Sep 30 '13 at 21:17
    
Sorry my fault, I'll fix the code above –  john Sep 30 '13 at 21:20
    
Thanks John, that error is gone now.. But I am getting very different result for schemaId. I have updated my question with the actual code.. –  AKIWEB Sep 30 '13 at 21:25
    
@TrekkieTechieT-T That's an endianess issue, are you familar with that concept? Basically the problem is that Java and your implementation of C++ are using different formats for binary I/O of integers. That complicates things. –  john Sep 30 '13 at 21:34
    
no I am not.. :( I updated question again with very strange issue.. If I am using different datatype, I am getting different result.. –  AKIWEB Sep 30 '13 at 21:35

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