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Suppose I have the following graph (arrows indicate direction of the connection) and I want to count the size of the cluster of black nodes:

Undirected square lattice graph.

which is organized in the memory as a list of nodes, such that each node has a list of its neighbors nodes. I want to count, starting from any node, how many nodes have the node[i].State == 1, if the given node is also with state 1. Thus, I implemented a method Node.GetClusterSize(), in which I count the cluster size (it is based in Depth-First Search algorithm):

public class Node
{
    public Int32 State { get; private set; } // 0 = white; 1 = black;

    public Boolean Visited { get; private set; }

    public List<Node> InputNeigh { get; private set; } // list of references to
                                                       // neighbors nodes

    public Int32 GetClusterSize()
    {
        this.Visited = true;
        if (this.State == 1)
        {
            Int32 s = 1, i = 0;
            while (i < this.InputNeigh.Count)
            {
                if (!this.InputNeigh[i].Visited)
                {
                    s += this.InputNeigh[i].GetClusterSize();
                }
                i++;
            }
            this.Visited = false; // this is an important step, I'll explain why
            return s;
        }
        else
        {
            return 0;
        }
    }
    public void Evolve() { /* doesn't matter for this question */ }
}

Now, I need to mark nodes as not visited because I count the cluster size for every node at every timestep of the main simulation (the state of the nodes is evolving with time, so clusters may change size in the next timestep).

This issue could be easily fixed if, instead of a flag in the Node objects, I have an external list of Boolean, which a given element i correspond to node i: List<Boolean> nodeStatus, and passing this list as reference to the function Node.GetClusterSize(). But then, I would have to reset this list at every timestep, slowing down the code (performance matters!).

The failure of the above code is exactly marking the node as not visited after iterating through its neighbors. This situation is better visualized with the following tree (visited from left to right and supposing I first call node[0].GetClusterSize()):

Algorithm to count cluster size

The Depth-First Search iterates across the blue path in the above tree and, when it reaches the node 3, it knows that all its neighbors have already been visited, marks 3 as not visited and returns s = 1. As 3 is the next neighbor of 2 to be visited, and 3 is marked as not visited (although it has already been visited), it checks again and the algorithm goes into a StackOverflow exception or, at best, returns the wrong size of the cluster.

Thus, I came up with 2 ideas, although I still don't know how to implement them:

1) Implement a Breadth-First Search algorithm; Although I do not know how to apply this concept to the presented situation.

2) Implement Depth-First Search in a sequential way (not recursively). Nevertheless, I can't imagine how it is possible.

Do you have any idea to override this issue? Any suggestion?

Thank you in advance!

PS: The graph can be way larger than this example and there may be more than one black cluster in the network at the same time, disconnected from each other. Thus, it is not just a matter of counting black elements.

share|improve this question
up vote 8 down vote accepted

Do not mutate an object that you are attempting to query; that way lies madness because as you note, you then have to unmutate the object.

Look at it this way. You have a relation defined. A black node is related to another black node if there is any edge directly between them. When given a black node you wish to compute the size of the reflexive and transitive closure of this relation.

In your example the relation appears to also be symmetric, so the closure would then define an equivalence class, and your question is then "given a member, find the size of its equivalence class.

So let's solve the more general problem.

What is a relation? As a commenter points out, a relation is properly a set of ordered pairs. But it is convenient to think of your relation as a function which when given an element, gives you a sequence of all the elements that are related to it. In this case: given a black node, the relation function gives you a sequence of all the neighbouring black nodes.

Here we have a non-recursive method which when given an item and a relation computes the transitive closure of that relation:

static HashSet<T> TransitiveClosure<T>(
    Func<T, IEnumerable<T>> relation,
    T item)
{
    var closure = new HashSet<T>();
    var stack = new Stack<T>();
    stack.Push(item); 
    while(stack.Count > 0)
    {
        T current = stack.Pop();
        foreach(T newItem in relation(current))
        {
            if (!closure.Contains(newItem))
            {
                closure.Add(newItem);
                stack.Push(newItem);
            }
        }
    } 
    return closure;
} 

Notice that this is a non-recursive depth-first traversal with cycle detection.


Exercise: What simple changes could you make to this implementation to turn it into a non-recursive breadth-first traversal with cycle detection?


We create the reflexive and transitive closure easily enough:

static HashSet<T> TransitiveAndReflexiveClosure<T>(
    Func<T, IEnumerable<T>> relation,
    T item)
{
  var closure = TransitiveClosure(relation, item);
  closure.Add(item);
  return closure;
}

Exercise: Your relationship is symmetric, which means that when we start with a node X and visit a neighbor Y, then when we process Y it will put X back on the stack, and eventually in the closure. Therefore it is unnecessary to take the reflexive closure.

The previous argument is incorrect; it is necessary to take the reflexive closure. Which sentence in that argument contained the first mistake?


Now you have a method which you can call very easily:

var cluster = TransitiveAndReflexiveClosure<Node>(
    node => from n in node.InputNeigh where n.State == node.State select n,
    someNode);

And now you can simply ask the cluster for its size if that's what you want.

(And please change the name of InputNeigh. Abbrevs are totes uncool, yo, unless you are 13 years old.)

share|improve this answer
    
I think this is a very elegant and general solution, although the execution time for this approach would be O(N^2), with N = number of Nodes, isn't it? (because of the checking if the closure already contains an element) – Girardi Sep 30 '13 at 23:36
    
@Girardi closure is a HashSet and HashSet.Contains() is an O(1) operation (assuming reasonable hashing function). – svick Sep 30 '13 at 23:47
    
@Girardi: svick is correct; checking for membership in a hash set is cheap. As an exercise, try working out the asymptotic cost of this algorithm given the number of nodes n and the average number of edges per node, e. (Note that e might be a function of n, but obviously cannot be more than n in a conventional graph.) – Eric Lippert Oct 1 '13 at 3:36
1  
@EricLippert This answer is pretty amazing; I love when people use math to solve programming problems! But I'm not sure about your terminology. A relation isn't a type of a function, but the other way around. In this case you could describe it as: if E is an equivalence relation on A, then map each element to its equivalence class, a -> [a]_E. And what you call a transitive closure is more like an equivalence class (sans one element). A transitive closure is an extension of an existing relation that satisfies transitivity (e.g. say aEb and bEc, but !aEc. The transitive closure adds aEc). – rliu Oct 1 '13 at 4:27
    
@roliu: Mathematically a relation is a set of ordered pairs; you are correct that a function is also a set of ordered pairs with the restriction that no two pairs have the same first item. But for the sort of finite relations we're talking about here it is equivalent to say that a relation is the function that takes a first element to the set of all the second elements. In this particular example the relation appears to be symmetric and reflexive, and so the transitive closure of the relation is an equivalence relation. – Eric Lippert Oct 1 '13 at 5:10

Sequential breadth-first-search, using a list to reset the Visited flag:

public int GetClusterSize()
{
    if (State != 1) return 0;

    List<Node> cluster = new List<Node>();

    Stack<Node> stack = new Stack<Node>();
    stack.Push(this);
    while (stack.Count > 0)
    {
        Node node = stack.Pop();
        if (node.Visited) continue;

        node.Visited = true;
        cluster.Add(node);
        foreach (var neigh in node.InputNeigh)
        {
            if (neigh.State == 1 && !neigh.Visited)
            {
                stack.Push(neigh);
            }
        }
    }

    int clusterSize = cluster.Count;
    foreach (var node in cluster)
    {
        node.Visited = false;
    }

    return clusterSize;
}

An alternative would be to use a generation-tag instead of the Visited-flag. If the generation matches the target, the node is considered as visited. With this approach, you don't need to reset the value after the algorithm finishes.

private static int NextGeneration = 0;

public int Generation { get; private set; }

public int GetClusterSize()
{
    return GetClusterSizeInternal(NextGeneration++);
}

private int GetClusterSizeInternal(int target)
{
    if (State != 1) return 0;

    Generation = target;

    int sum = 0;
    foreach (var neigh in InputNeigh)
    {
        if (neigh.State == 1 && neigh.Generation != target)
        {
            sum += neigh.GetClusterSizeInternal(target);
        }
    }

    return sum;
}

Same, but without recursion:

private static int NextGeneration = 0;

public int Generation { get; private set; }

public int GetClusterSize()
{
    if (State != 1) return 0;

    int target = NextGeneration++;

    Stack<Node> stack = new Stack<Node>();
    stack.Push(this);

    int count = 0;
    while (stack.Count > 0)
    {
        Node node = stack.Pop();
        if (node.Generation == target) continue;

        node.Generation = target;

        count++;
        foreach (var neigh in node.InputNeigh)
        {
            if (neigh.State == 1 && neigh.Generation != target)
            {
                stack.Push(neigh);
            }
        }
    }

    return count;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is an approach to the Breadth first algorithm, right? – Girardi Sep 30 '13 at 21:31
    
well, I think that the Generation approach would also require a reset if I want to count the cluster size of the same node in the next simulation timestep, isn't it? Maybe I could initialize the NextGeneration counter inside the method GetClusterSize(), and then start with your implementation... – Girardi Sep 30 '13 at 22:30
1  
If you want to avoid recursion (which could blow up your stack depending on the depth) you could use a queue or a stack to push the nodes to visit on. If you use a queue it will be BFS, if you use a stack it will be DFS – ChrisWue Sep 30 '13 at 22:33
    
@Girardi No. GetClusterSizeInternal requires a unique number each time, to be able to distinguish visited nodes from previous executions of the method. NextGeneration is static, so it will be shared between all nodes. – Markus Jarderot Sep 30 '13 at 22:34
1  
Also I would extract the visiting logic out of the Node and have an external visitor on the graph doing the counting. – ChrisWue Sep 30 '13 at 22:36

Rather than List you might consider System.Collections.BitArray

You might try something like this (pseudo code):

Stack<T> stk
stk.Push(node1)
grandparentnode = null
count = 0
if node1 state is 1 count++
while (node = stk.Pop())
    foreach connect in node.connections
        if the connect state is 1
            if connect != grandparentnode 
                stk.Push(connect)
                count++
    grandparentnode = node

I think that will work, but graphs are hard and my brain is very small and filled with errors :-(

Adding to post based on comment.

The grandparent node was a misguided attempt to eliminate the "Visited" field by maintaining a constant rolling grandparent/parent/child relationship. I'm a good programmer but perhaps don't have a mind for graph theory (which is why I'm drawn to such questions :-D) Anyway here is a complete program with revised code which I reached working with my original ideas. It depends on the grid like, double connected arrangement of your nodes and the idea of having a unique numerically increasing label for each. Those constraints might be too specific for your usage. I used a dictionary, but it should never contain more than 4 items. Created a custom class optimized for such a small collection would improve performance. This should remove the need to keep a 'visited' state, run quickly and not recurse. To find any subtree you need to start at the lowest label node of that tree.

It is of course also possible it arrived at the right answer out of luck :-) Worst case if gives anyone interested a full program skeleton to play with.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading.Tasks;
using System.Xml.Linq;

namespace stackoverflow1 {
    class Program {
        class Node {
            public int Number;
            public int State = 0;
            public List<Node> Connects = new List<Node>();
            public Node(int num, int state) {
                Number = num;
                State = state;

                }
            }

        static void Main(string[] args) {
            var nodes = new List<Node>();
            nodes.Add(new Node(0, -1)); // not used
            nodes.Add(new Node(1, 1));
            nodes.Add(new Node(2, 1));
            nodes.Add(new Node(3, 1));
            nodes.Add(new Node(4, 0));
            nodes.Add(new Node(5, 1));
            nodes.Add(new Node(6, 1));
            nodes.Add(new Node(7, 0));
            nodes.Add(new Node(8, 0));
            nodes.Add(new Node(9, 0));
            nodes[1].Connects.Add(nodes[2]);
            nodes[1].Connects.Add(nodes[4]);

            nodes[2].Connects.Add(nodes[1]);
            nodes[2].Connects.Add(nodes[3]); 
            nodes[2].Connects.Add(nodes[5]);

            nodes[3].Connects.Add(nodes[2]); 
            nodes[3].Connects.Add(nodes[6]);

            nodes[4].Connects.Add(nodes[1]);
            nodes[4].Connects.Add(nodes[5]); 
            nodes[4].Connects.Add(nodes[7]);

            nodes[5].Connects.Add(nodes[2]);
            nodes[5].Connects.Add(nodes[4]); 
            nodes[5].Connects.Add(nodes[6]);
            nodes[5].Connects.Add(nodes[8]);

            nodes[6].Connects.Add(nodes[3]);
            nodes[6].Connects.Add(nodes[5]); 
            nodes[6].Connects.Add(nodes[9]);

            nodes[7].Connects.Add(nodes[4]);
            nodes[7].Connects.Add(nodes[8]); 

            nodes[8].Connects.Add(nodes[5]);
            nodes[8].Connects.Add(nodes[7]); 
            nodes[8].Connects.Add(nodes[9]);

            nodes[9].Connects.Add(nodes[6]);
            nodes[9].Connects.Add(nodes[8]); 

            var dict = new Dictionary<int, Node>();
            foreach (var n in nodes) {
                if (n.State == 1) {
                    dict.Add(n.Number, n);
                    break;
                    }
                }

            int count = dict.Count;
            while (dict.Count > 0) {
                foreach (var k in dict.Keys.ToArray()) { // retains node order
                    var n = dict[k]; // get the first node in number order
                    dict.Remove(k);
                    foreach (var node in n.Connects) { // look over it's connections/children
                        if ((node.State == 1) 
                        &&  (node.Number > n.Number))  {
                            if (dict.ContainsKey(node.Number) == false) {
                                // only add if this is has a greater number than the one
                                // being considered because lower values have already been
                                // processed
                                dict.Add(node.Number, node);
                                count++;
                                }
                            }
                        }
                    }
                }

            Console.WriteLine("Count = {0}", count);
            Console.ReadKey();
            }
        }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Well, only reading your code, it comes to my attention a possible issue: I don't quite understand the role of grandparentnode here. Can you clarify the idea a bit? PS: thanks for bringing BitArray to my attention. To this particular problem, it would probably suffice, but this is an abstraction of my real problem, in which the state variable is actually a Double, because it should be continuous and not discrete. – Girardi Sep 30 '13 at 22:21

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