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Is there an already-written BitCount method for big.Int? There doesn't seem to be one in math/big.

Obviously I will write one myself if not - does anyone have one already written?

I want the number of set bits in the number. Like Java BigInteger.bitCount().

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

I put one together myself - note that this does not take into account the sign of the number. This returns the bit count of the the raw bytes behind the big.Int.

// How many bits?
func BitCount(n big.Int) int {
    var count int = 0
    for _, b := range n.Bytes() {
        count += int(bitCounts[b])
    }
    return count
}

// The bit counts for each byte value (0 - 255).
var bitCounts = []int8{
    // Generated by Java BitCount of all values from 0 to 255
    0, 1, 1, 2, 1, 2, 2, 3, 
    1, 2, 2, 3, 2, 3, 3, 4, 
    1, 2, 2, 3, 2, 3, 3, 4, 
    2, 3, 3, 4, 3, 4, 4, 5, 
    1, 2, 2, 3, 2, 3, 3, 4, 
    2, 3, 3, 4, 3, 4, 4, 5,  
    2, 3, 3, 4, 3, 4, 4, 5, 
    3, 4, 4, 5, 4, 5, 5, 6, 
    1, 2, 2, 3, 2, 3, 3, 4, 
    2, 3, 3, 4, 3, 4, 4, 5, 
    2, 3, 3, 4, 3, 4, 4, 5, 
    3, 4, 4, 5, 4, 5, 5, 6, 
    2, 3, 3, 4, 3, 4, 4, 5, 
    3, 4, 4, 5, 4, 5, 5, 6, 
    3, 4, 4, 5, 4, 5, 5, 6, 
    4, 5, 5, 6, 5, 6, 6, 7, 
    1, 2, 2, 3, 2, 3, 3, 4, 
    2, 3, 3, 4, 3, 4, 4, 5, 
    2, 3, 3, 4, 3, 4, 4, 5, 
    3, 4, 4, 5, 4, 5, 5, 6, 
    2, 3, 3, 4, 3, 4, 4, 5, 
    3, 4, 4, 5, 4, 5, 5, 6, 
    3, 4, 4, 5, 4, 5, 5, 6, 
    4, 5, 5, 6, 5, 6, 6, 7, 
    2, 3, 3, 4, 3, 4, 4, 5, 
    3, 4, 4, 5, 4, 5, 5, 6, 
    3, 4, 4, 5, 4, 5, 5, 6, 
    4, 5, 5, 6, 5, 6, 6, 7, 
    3, 4, 4, 5, 4, 5, 5, 6, 
    4, 5, 5, 6, 5, 6, 6, 7, 
    4, 5, 5, 6, 5, 6, 6, 7, 
    5, 6, 6, 7, 6, 7, 7, 8,
}
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I think it would be faster if you used an int8 here instead of int, you'll get more(4x?) cache hits. – deft_code Oct 2 '13 at 20:44

As already mentioned, for quick efficient raw access to the underlying bits of a big.Int you want to use big.Bits. Also, quicker than either an 8 bit lookup table or a simple loop is to use one of well know 64 bit methods of counting bits (aka Hamming weight). Even faster, you could use an assembly implementation of popcount that uses a native CPU instruction.

Without using assembly, or catering to special cases where it's known there are few bits set, this is likely one of the faster/fastest Go implementations (it could be made faster on 32 bit machines by using uint32 and adjusting the popcount function accordingly):

func BitCount(n *big.Int) int {
    count := 0
    for _, v := range n.Bits() {
        count += popcount(uint64(v))
    }
    return count
}

// Straight and simple C to Go translation from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hamming_weight
func popcount(x uint64) int {
    const (
        m1  = 0x5555555555555555 //binary: 0101...
        m2  = 0x3333333333333333 //binary: 00110011..
        m4  = 0x0f0f0f0f0f0f0f0f //binary:  4 zeros,  4 ones ...
        h01 = 0x0101010101010101 //the sum of 256 to the power of 0,1,2,3...
    )
    x -= (x >> 1) & m1             //put count of each 2 bits into those 2 bits
    x = (x & m2) + ((x >> 2) & m2) //put count of each 4 bits into those 4 bits
    x = (x + (x >> 4)) & m4        //put count of each 8 bits into those 8 bits
    return int((x * h01) >> 56)    //returns left 8 bits of x + (x<<8) + (x<<16) + (x<<24) + ...
}

Benchmarks and comparisons of this and other implementations presented here is available in full on GitHub gist.

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FYI, the following solution is simpler and faster than the original solution provided here:

func BitCountFast(z *big.Int) int {
    var count int
    for _, x := range z.Bits() {
            for x != 0 {
                    x &= x-1
                    count++
            }
    }
    return count
}

It outperforms the original solution by 5x on my machine:

BenchmarkBitCountFast-4 100000000           19.5 ns/op         0 B/op          0 allocs/op
BenchmarkBitCountOrig-4 20000000            96.1 ns/op        16 B/op          1 allocs/op
share|improve this answer
    
One of the reasons this is faster is that Bits returns raw access to an underlying []big.Word whereas Bytes allocates a new []byte. Also note that the outer for loop here can be made faster using standard 32 or 64 bit ops to calculate the Hamming weight of each big.Word (just a uintptr) and removing the nested loop. E.g. See this gist comparison and benchmark. – Dave C Sep 21 '15 at 18:04
    
(note I've turned my previous comment into an answer) – Dave C Sep 21 '15 at 18:44
    
Another reason my code was faster is sparse bit sets used in benchmarks :) Your solution is faster with dense bit sets. – valyala Oct 1 '15 at 10:39

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