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I'm sure that I'm misinterpreting something in the Java Language Specification but I can't figure out what. My question is this: On many systems, java forces the directory structure to parallel package names i.e. if the package name is foo.bar then the package files should reside in the folder foo/bar. However, this isn't part of the Java Language Specification and is considered optional. So, what if you had an implementation of Java on one platform that enforced these rules and another implementation that didn't? Would the implementation that required the file hierarchy be able to find the files in the unstructured package used by the other implementation? Does Java always search for class files in all class paths recursively? If so, then why require the package names to mimic the directory structure to begin with?

EDIT: For example, suppose that we have two java files one.java and two.java. At the top of these files we prepend "package foo.bar;" thus labeling these files for the package foo.bar. Now, MOST Java implementations will make us put these files into a file hierarchy so that we have /foo/bar/one.java and /foo/bar/two.java. However, according to the JLS this is not required. Now, suppose that we have a Java implementation which does not force us to put them in a hierarchy. That is, we have a .jar file and it has contents one.java and two.java in the top level directory. Now, if we load that .jar file into a system which relies on file hierarchy to locate class files, will it be able to find those class files?

EDIT: So, after a little bit of experimentation, I found out that if you set up packages without the appropriate directory hierarchy by jar cvf foo.jar one.class two.class and you try to import them as foo.bar.two and foo.bar.one it just doesn't work even if the packages are specified - you get a NoClassDefFoundError. This is a pretty interesting result to me considering http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/package/managingfiles.html says, "Many implementations of the Java platform rely on hierarchical file systems to manage source and class files, although The Java Language Specification does not require this."

In short, this means that if you are working on an implementation of Java that has decided to use the hierarchical directory structure to manage packages(which is nearly all of them) then the generated jar files may not be compatible with other systems which did not implement the same way. It seems like the Java community has gotten around this by convention, but I'd be interested to hear more if anything has any additional information.

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1- Package names provide name space context, allowing you to have two classes with the same but which reside within separate packages. 2- Java converts a package name into a search when it looks up classes. So if you had a class named Wally and it was declared to reside in foo.bar, Java would be looking for foo/bar/Wally.class by prefixing it's known classpath elements to it, otherwise it wouldn't really know what it was looking for or be sure that it found the right thing :P –  MadProgrammer Oct 1 '13 at 1:00
    
Well, here's what's confusing: "Many implementations of the Java platform rely on hierarchical file systems to manage source and class files, although The Java Language Specification does not require this." from docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/package/managingfiles.html. That implies that implementations of java that don't rely on the filesystem hierarchy have some other way to identify where a .class file is. But then a jar file packaged using that system wouldn't be compatible with one that did use the filesystem hierarchy setup because java wouldn't know where to look. –  doliver Oct 1 '13 at 1:52
    
Okay, but even so, MOST implementations of Java rely on a filesystem hierarchy to locate .class files, but it's not required. So, if you had an implementation of Java which did not rely on the filesystem then a foreign Java implementation which did rely on the file system would have no way of locating .class files. –  doliver Oct 1 '13 at 1:57
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@doliver, does the answer from EJP below answer this question? If so, please accept it by clicking the tick mark to the left. That helps the system differentiate between unanswered and answered questions. Thanks. –  halfer Jul 2 '14 at 22:21
    
@halfer, No, this question is unanswered. EJP misunderstood the question I believe. Feel free to look to the edits I made after EJP posted his answer, above. –  doliver Jul 3 '14 at 0:19

1 Answer 1

But then a jar file packaged using that system wouldn't be compatible with one that did use the filesystem hierarchy setup because java wouldn't know where to look.

I am taking that as the actual question, and it is not correct. A JAR file is a platform-independent entity, based on the ZIP format, which can have directories internally, regardless of whether the platform does or not.

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