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I'm trying to write a function like std::for_each, that in addition to the normal usage, can also take a std::function<bool (param)>. A false return value means that I want to break out of the loop. The code below is what I've gotten so far.

The second call to a.visit([&](int) -> void) does not compile when evaluating !visitor(i). Is it possible to make this work or am I barking up the wrong tree?

I'm using MSVC 2010 but want the code to be generally C++11 compatible.

#include <list>
#include <string>
#include <iostream>

struct A 
{
    std::list<int> _lst;

    template<typename _F>
    void visit(_F visitor) 
    {
        for(std::list<int>::const_iterator it = _lst.begin(), end = _lst.end() ; it != end ; it++) {
            int i = *it;
            if (std::is_void<decltype(visitor(i))>::value) {
                visitor(i);
            } else {
               if (!visitor(i)) { // <----- error C2171: '!' : illegal on operands of type 'void'
                   break;
               }
            }
        }
    }

};

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    A a;
    // populate a
    for (int i = 0 ; i < 10 ; i++) { 
        a._lst.push_back(i); 
    }

    a.visit([](int i) -> bool {
        std::cout << i << std::endl;
        return i < 5;
    });

    a.visit([](int i) {
        std::cout << i << std::endl;
    });
}
share|improve this question
    
The code on both sides of the if branch need to be correct and compilable, so u can't choose based on std::is_void inside the function body. –  Troy Oct 1 '13 at 1:54
    
Why do you use names starting with an underscore and a capital letter such as _F? –  robson3.14 Oct 1 '13 at 11:41
    
That's the convention I use for template parameters. I think I picked it up from looking at STL code. –  kylewm Oct 1 '13 at 15:18
1  
@kyle_wm: the library implementors usually try very hard to avoid name clashes, even with nasty macros (which do not respect scope). The standard makes their life easier by giving them exclusive permission to use names starting with either two underscores, or one underscore and uppercase letter. If you are not writing the implementation (meaning you want your code to be portable) you should not use those identifiers. –  DanielKO Oct 1 '13 at 19:50
    
@DanielKO Oh, that's embarrassing. Thanks for the info, I will stop using them. –  kylewm Oct 1 '13 at 21:11

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Here's how I would implement for_almost_each; I'm using namespace std plus type aliases for readability purposes.

#include <algorithm>
#include <iterator>
#include <functional>

using namespace std;

template<class Iter, class Func>
Iter
for_almost_each_impl(Iter begin, Iter end, Func func, std::true_type)
{
    for (auto i = begin; i!=end; ++i)
        if (!func(*i))
            return i;
    return end;
}

template<class Iter, class Func>
Iter
for_almost_each_impl(Iter begin, Iter end, Func func, std::false_type)
{
    for_each(begin, end, func);
    return end;
}


template<class Iter, class Func>
Iter for_almost_each(Iter begin, Iter end, Func func)
{
    using Val = typename iterator_traits<Iter>::value_type;
    using Res = typename result_of<Func(Val)>::type;
    return for_almost_each_impl(begin, end,
                                func,
                                is_convertible<Res, bool>{} );
}

I used is_convertible, as it seems to make more sense than is_same.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks very much, I accepted @Troy's answer because it was first, but I'm learning a lot from reading yours too! –  kylewm Oct 1 '13 at 5:18
    
Also note the use of result_of, which behaves properly independently of how the argument has to be constructed; Troy's answer works only when the functor accepts the literal 0. –  DanielKO Oct 1 '13 at 7:25
    
@kyle_wm: You should select the best answer, and can change your mind precisely because later answers may be better. IMO this is such an example where the latter answer is better. –  MSalters Oct 1 '13 at 8:30
    
@MSalters, OK, changed. I had accepted Troy's answer because it directly fixed the mistake in my example code (which seems good, didactically). But I can see how this answer is more general/more useful to others searching for the same question. Thanks for your input. –  kylewm Oct 1 '13 at 15:33

Your std::is_void needs to be done at compile time and can't be done inside the function body. This use of function overloading will work:

#include <list>
#include <string>
#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits> // missing header

struct A 
{
    std::list<int> _lst;

    // wrapper for bool returning visitor
    template<typename _F, typename Iter>
    bool do_visit(_F visitor, Iter it, std::true_type)
    {
      return visitor(*it);
    }

    // wrapper for non-bool returning visitor
    template<typename _F, typename Iter>
    bool do_visit(_F visitor, Iter it, std::false_type)
    {
      visitor(*it);
      return true;
    }

    template<typename _F>
    void visit(_F visitor) 
    {
        for (auto it = _lst.begin(), end = _lst.end() ; it != end ; it++) {
            // select correct visitor wrapper function using overloading
            if (!do_visit(visitor, it, std::is_same<bool, decltype(visitor(0))>())) {
              break;
            }
        }
    }
};

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    A a;
    // populate a
    for (int i = 0 ; i < 10 ; i++) { 
        a._lst.push_back(i); 
    }

    a.visit([](int i) -> bool {
        std::cout << i << std::endl;
        return i < 5;
    });

    a.visit([](int i) {
        std::cout << i << std::endl;
    });
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's exactly what I was misunderstanding. Thanks!! –  kylewm Oct 1 '13 at 5:13
    
Note that decltype(visitor(0)) won't work when 0 is not a valid argument for visitor. std::result_of exists because of that. –  DanielKO Oct 1 '13 at 7:37
    
It's visiting a list of int's not a list of unknown template types. –  Troy Oct 1 '13 at 7:46
    
As an alternative, write overloads of do_visit which accept either a T* or a void*, and pass a static_cast<result_of(visitor))*> (nullptr). That avoids the need for std::is_same. Note that the current implementation is too strict anyway: it requires that the return type of visitor is exactly bool, not convertible to bool. –  MSalters Oct 1 '13 at 8:24

This lambda doesn't return a value, which is why you're getting an error that "visitor" is returning void:

a.visit([](int i) {
    std::cout << i << std::endl;
});

You could make this work by rewriting as:

a.visit([](int i) -> bool {
    std::cout << i << std::endl;
    return true;
});
share|improve this answer
    
That's missing the point. Both calls should work, the goal is to change visit to make it work. –  MSalters Oct 1 '13 at 8:31

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