Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Ok I'm getting a nullpointerexception here:

    public int getIndex(int empNum)
{
    int index = 0;
    for(int i = 0; i < employees.length; i++)
    {
        int en = employees[i].getEmployeeNumber(); //Exception is at this line

        if(en == empNum)
        {
            index = i;
        }
    }

    return index;
}

This is the code that it is pointing to:

    public int getEmployeeNumber()
    {
        return employeeNum;
    }

Where employeeNum has already been defined and added to my array by the following (this method is mostly just for error checking to make sure the employee number falls in to my specified range):

 public void setEmployeeNumber(int empNum)
{
    Scanner sc = new Scanner(System.in);

    do
    {

        if(empNum < 10000 || empNum > 99999)
        {
            System.out.println("Invalid Employee number. Choose again between 10000 and 99999.");

            empNum = sc.nextInt();

        }
    }
    while(empNum < 10000 || empNum > 99999);
    employeeNum = empNum;



}    

Now, I know the employee number is being stored correctly as employeeNum, because my code is printing out it's value just fine in other parts. I am also using the same code to get the employee number in other parts of my code and it's not throwing an exception. I don't understand what's going on here why the same code would work in some places and not in another. It's not pointing to a null value in the array, it never gets to this part of the code until after the first value of the array has already been set.

Edit: here is the code where the array gets initialized.

public class EmployeeManager{

private Employee[] employees;
private final int employeeMax = 100;
private int currentEmployees;

public EmployeeManager()
{
    employees = new Employee[employeeMax];
    currentEmployees = 0;

}

This is the method being called by the main that sets the value of an element in the array where ty is a user selection for choosing which type of employee to set. The main method then asks for each individual variable before sending all the information together to this method:

 public void addEmployee(int ty, String fn, String ln, char mi, char gen, int empNum, boolean ft, double p)
{

    if(ty == 1)
    {
        employees[currentEmployees] = new HourlyEmployee(fn, ln, mi, gen, empNum, ft, p);

        currentEmployees++;
    }
    else if(ty == 2)
    {
        employees[currentEmployees] = new SalaryEmployee(fn, ln, mi, gen, empNum, ft, p);

        currentEmployees++;
    }
    else if(ty == 3)
    {
        employees[currentEmployees] = new CommissionEmployee(fn, ln, mi, gen, empNum, ft, p);

        currentEmployees++;
    }
}

Ok, I stopped the exception without initializing all elements of the array. What I did was change

for(int i = 0; i < employees.length; i++)

to

for(int i = 0; i < currentEmployees; i++)

This way it no longer passes uninitialized values to my method. This way I don't have to initialize all the values of the array at the start. The currentEmployees variable is my counter which tells the method what index of the array to add the next object at.

share|improve this question
    
Are employees and its elements initialized? –  Sotirios Delimanolis Oct 1 '13 at 2:01
    
yes, the first thing that happens is the array is initialized. I'm getting this exception after I've already added values to the array. –  Neonjoe Oct 1 '13 at 2:03
3  
But are its elements initialized? –  Sotirios Delimanolis Oct 1 '13 at 2:04
    
@Neonjoe Show us the code to initialize employees then –  TheKojuEffect Oct 1 '13 at 2:04
    
@TheKojuEffect I edited my original post to show where I'm initializing the array –  Neonjoe Oct 1 '13 at 2:06
show 2 more comments

1 Answer

int en = employees[i].getEmployeeNumber(); //Exception is at this line

Make sure you initialize all the elements in employees array.

You just initialized employees array but not its elements.

public EmployeeManager()
{
    employees = new Employee[employeeMax];

    for(int i = 0; i< employees.length; i++) {
        // initialize elements
        employees[i] = // new Employee();
    }
    currentEmployees = 0;

}
share|improve this answer
    
This seems more like a comment. In fact, there are already several comments that suggest this, which were posted minutes before you posted this as an answer. –  Josh M Oct 1 '13 at 2:05
    
I'm not understanding what you're saying here. There is a menu system in place to add 1 employee at a time where it asks for multiple data points (2 strings, 2 chars, an int, and a boolean). From this it sets the value in the array to that –  Neonjoe Oct 1 '13 at 2:09
    
I'm still not sure what you are talking about doing here. It seems that if I initialized every value of the array, I would have to be entering in all the pertinent information for each employee at the same time, which completely negates the menu system implemented by the main. –  Neonjoe Oct 1 '13 at 2:16
1  
@Neonjoe, he is saying that you are looking the wrong area. employees[i].getEmployeeNumber() is not throwing a NPE because employeeNumber is null (it can't be, it's a primitive), but rather because employees[i] is null. You instantiated the array, but have not put any objects into it. Therefore, the object at employees[i] is undefined, or null. –  Brandon Oct 1 '13 at 2:27
    
@Neonjoe Obviously I'm unaware of your implementation details. What I'm saying is that, the elements in an array must be initialized if its properties is to be accessed like Brandon mentioned. –  TheKojuEffect Oct 1 '13 at 2:37
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.