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How can I set the initial directory to be where my test data exists?

var relPath = System.IO.Path.Combine( Application.StartupPath, "../../" )

dlg.Title = "Open a Credit Card List";
dlg.InitialDirectory = relPath ;

The default directory it opens up to is where the .exe exists: Project2\Project2\bin\Debug

I want it to open up by default in the Project2 folder where my test data exists. But it does not allow me to move up a parent directory. How do I get around this?

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use Directory.GetParent(string path)

string relPath = Directory.GetParent(Application.StartupPath).Parent.FullName;

Or using DirectoryInfo

DirectoryInfo drinfo =new DirectoryInfo(path);

DirectoryInfo twoLevelsUp =drinfo.Parent.Parent;
dlg.InitialDirectory = twoLevelsUp.FullName;;
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To convert your relative path to an absolute path you can use Path.GetFullPath()

var relPath = System.IO.Path.Combine(Application.StartupPath, @"\..\..");
relPath = Path.GetFullPath(relPath);
dlg.InitialDirectory = relPath;

Alternatively if you wish to change the working directory to your test data:

Directory.SetCurrentDirectory(relPath);

More information: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.io.path.getfullpath.aspx http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.io.directory.setcurrentdirectory.aspx

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You are going to want to either declare that string @, use \\ or switch the direction of those slashes or else you will get a compiler error. – Scott Chamberlain Oct 1 '13 at 3:26
    
oops, that's what you get for typing an answer in a hurry. Fixed. – codemonkeh Oct 1 '13 at 6:10

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