Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm attempting to solve the following problem from coderbyte.com:

Using the JavaScript language, have the function SimpleSymbols(str) take the str parameter being passed and determine if it is an acceptable sequence by either returning the string true or false. The str parameter will be composed of + and = symbols with several letters between them (ie. ++d+===+c++==a) and for the string to be true each letter must be surrounded by a + symbol. So the string to the left would be false. The string will not be empty and will have at least one letter.

The following is my attempt:

function SimpleSymbols(str) { 

  // code goes here  
var abc = 'abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz';

for (var i = 0; i < str.length; i++) {
    if (abc.indexOf(str[i]) !== -1) {
        if (str[i-1] + str[i+1] === "++") {
            return true;
        }
        else {
            return false;
        }
    }
}

}

This works for the following cases:

SimpleSymbols("+a+d+"); // true 
SimpleSymbols("+ab+d+"); // false
SimpleSymbols("b+d+"); // false

The only case I have found where this doesn't provide the right answer is when there is a trailing letter, for example:

SimpleSymbols("+a+b"); // true

This returns true, when in fact it should return false.

NB: I'm assuming string will be lowercase... I haven't dealt with case sensitivity, but I'd like to get the lowercase version working and then I will make it case independent.

Any ideas on what is wrong with my code?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

I interpret this as: There is no letter which is not preceded/followed by a character other than plus (including none):

function SimpleSymbols(str) { 
  return !/^[a-z]|[^+][a-z]|[a-z][^+]|[a-z]$/i.test(str)
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is awesome, but I haven't yet learned regular expressions! –  Everes83 Oct 1 '13 at 5:08

This returns 'true' on the first successful letter surrounded by + symbols, it doesn't continue checking thru to the end.

I also wonder whether string indices would be out-of-bounds [i-1], [i+1] on the first/last character? It appears not, but I can't find a language ref.

Better:

function SimpleSymbols(str) { 
    var abc = 'abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz';

    for (var i = 0; i < str.length; i++) {
        if (abc.indexOf(str[i]) !== -1) {
            if (str[i-1] + str[i+1] != "++") {
                return false;
            }
        }
    }
    return true;
}

There are also probably performance improvements that could be made (checking bounding characters by AND rather than by string addition), and you could also do it by a regex.

By regex:

if (str.search( /[^+][a-z]/) >= 0)     // will match letters with no + beforehand.
    return false;
if (str.search( /[a-z][^+]/) >= 0)     // will match letters with no + afterward.
    return false;
return true;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for fixing my bad code, and for the suggestions on performance improvements. Is string concatenation generally bad from a performance perspective? –  Everes83 Oct 1 '13 at 5:09
    
You're welcome! Generally, string concatenations aren't fast.. they need to allocate & copy a variable-length array, which is a lot slower than just testing/ or adding an integer in the processor. Don't worry about it, but if there's a simpler/faster alternative then prefer that. Hope this helps! –  Thomas W Oct 1 '13 at 5:14

I believe this is a perfect regex case Check the regex ^[^a-z]*(\++[a-z]\++[a-z]?)*[^a-z]*$ explained in here

Use it in javascript like this:

function SimpleSymbols(str) { 
   return !/^[^a-z]*(\++[a-z]\++[a-z]?)*[^a-z]*$/i.test(str);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Regex still looks like an Alien language to me... haven't tackled learning it yet. –  Everes83 Oct 1 '13 at 5:12
    
As you can see from the link it's explaining what's this expression means, you should start learning as it'll help you find any string patterns easily. Check regexpal.com to test your regex and check Regex Cheat sheet cheatography.com/davechild/cheat-sheets/regular-expressions –  Amr Gawish Oct 1 '13 at 5:54

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.