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public static void main(String[] args) throws ParseException {
    // create a date
    Date date = new Date();
    long diff = date.getTime();
    Date date1 = new Date(2013, 10, 1, 11, 6);
    long diff1 = date1.getTime();
    System.out.println("date is 1-10-2013, " + diff + " have passed.");
    System.out.println("date is 1-10-2013, " + diff1 + " have passed.");
}

and the output is

date is 1-10-2013, 1380605909318 have passed.
date is 1-10-2013, 61341428160000 have passed.

Can anybody elaborate on the difference beween 1380605909318 and 61341428160000?

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the time is in milliseconds –  gjman2 Oct 1 '13 at 5:44

7 Answers 7

up vote 12 down vote accepted

This line:

Date date1 = new Date(2013, 10, 1, 11, 6);

... doesn't do what you thing it does. That creates a Date object representing November 1st in the year 3913, at 11:06 local time. I don't think that's what you wanted.

Indeed, if you change your code to include the date itself rather than hard-coding what you think the right value will be, you'll see that:

System.out.println("date is " + date + ", " + diff + " have passed.");
System.out.println("date is " + date1 + ", " + diff1 + " have passed.");

There's a reason that constructor is deprecated - you should pay attention to deprecation, as well as to the documentation.

Now you could just use java.util.Calendar instead - but I'd actually recommend that you use Joda Time instead, if you possibly can. It's a much, much cleaner API than java.util.Calendar/Date. Alternative, if you can use a pre-release of Java 8, that has the new JSR-320 date/time API.

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+1 Joda-Time is simply awesome, and that is why there is a new DateTimeAPI in Java 8. –  Rohit Jain Oct 1 '13 at 5:49
    
@Jon Skeet Thanks.I have one more doubt, Can we not use any deprecated methods. –  shree18 Oct 1 '13 at 6:04
    
@shree18: You can, but you'd be best off avoiding them. And whether methods/classes/constructors are deprecated or not, you should always read the documentation for them. It's particularly important for deprecated members as the documentation may well explain why it's deprecated and give a preferred alternative. –  Jon Skeet Oct 1 '13 at 6:12
    
@Jon Skeet Thank you. –  shree18 Oct 1 '13 at 8:48

Just add this line

System.out.println("date is 1-10-2013, " + new Date(diff1) + " have passed.");

And you can see that the date is Sat Nov 01 11:06:00 IST 3913.

Date date1 = new Date(2013, 10, 1, 11, 6); is not what you thought it was. That's why you shouldn't use deprecated methods(constructor here).

As @JonSkeet mentioned, Joda is highly recommended over Java's Date.

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Oddly, months are zero based, so your 10 in the constructor is actually month 11!

And it doesn't stop there: year is from 1900!

From the javadoc:

year - the year minus 1900.

month - the month between 0-11.

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3  
I don't think 1 month gives that difference of milliseconds =\ –  Luiggi Mendoza Oct 1 '13 at 5:47
    
@LuiggiMendoza yep. Got it now ;) –  Bohemian Oct 1 '13 at 5:54

try

System.out.println("date is 1-10-2013, " + diff + " have passed.");
System.out.println("date is " + date1.toString() + diff1 + " have passed.");  

and you will see the error.

According to the javadocs for thsi deprecated API, the year - the year minus 1900

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/util/Date.html#Date(int, int, int, int, int)

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Date.getTime() returns you date and time in milliseconds.

Javadoc says

 Returns the number of milliseconds since January 1, 1970, 00:00:00 GMT
 represented by this Date object.

 @return  the number of milliseconds since January 1, 1970, 00:00:00 GMT
 represented by this date.

In second date, you are missing milliseconds as well

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For the second date object, the first argument takes (the year minus 1900).

So in your case if you want 2013, you should pass 113

From java docs Date class

public Date(int year,int month,int date,int hrs,int min)

Parameters:
year - the year minus 1900.
month - the month between 0-11.
date - the day of the month between 1-31.
hrs - the hours between 0-23.
min - the minutes between 0-59.

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 @Deprecated
 public Date(int year,
                   int month,
                   int date,
                   int hrs,
                   int min)

Deprecated. As of JDK version 1.1, replaced by Calendar.set(year + 1900, month, date, hrs, min) or GregorianCalendar(year + 1900, month, date, hrs, min).

Allocates a Date object and initializes it so that it represents the instant at the start of the minute specified by the year, month, date, hrs, and min arguments, in the local time zone.

Parameters:
    year - the year minus 1900.
    month - the month between 0-11.
    date - the day of the month between 1-31.
    hrs - the hours between 0-23.
    min - the minutes between 0-59.

So if you want to get the same or very near results you have to use as following

Date date1 = new Date(113, 9, 1, 11, 6);

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