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I can't find my mistake in here, if someone can help me would be great.

def heapsort (lista) :
    n= len(lista)-1
    k= n/2 
    while (k>0) :
        downheap(lista,n,k) 
        k-=1 
    while (n>=0) :
        (lista[1]),(lista[n])=(lista[n]),(lista[1]) 
        n-=1 
        return downheap(lista, n, 1) 
    return lista  

def downheap (lista, n, k) :
    v= lista[k] 
    while (k<=(n/2)) :
        j=k+k
        if (j<n and (lista[j]) == (lista[j])) :
            break
        (lista[k]) = (lista[j]) 
        k = j 
    lista[k] = v 

Error:

>>> heapsort([4,2,3,1])
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 5, in heapsort
  File "<stdin>", line 2, in downheap
TypeError: list indices must be integers, not float
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1  
Is this Python 3 perhaps? Python errors come with a full traceback, do include that when you ask about a Python problem. –  Martijn Pieters Oct 1 '13 at 7:04
    
And how would we go about reproducing your error? How do you call heapsort(), such that it triggers the exception? –  Martijn Pieters Oct 1 '13 at 7:07
    
I was able to guess, this time. But for future questions, include a small sample of code that lets us reproduce your problem. –  Martijn Pieters Oct 1 '13 at 7:07
    
Note that your code, as posted, contains a syntax error too, as the last if statement is missing a closing parenthesis. You have too many of those as it is, really. –  Martijn Pieters Oct 1 '13 at 7:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

In Python 3, using the / division operator always returns a float value:

>>> 2/2
1.0
>>> 3/2
1.5

Use floor division instead, the // operator:

k = n // 2

The // operator always returns an integer, flooring the result:

>>> 2//2
1
>>> 3//2
1

Perhaps you coded your functions from an example in Python 2; in Python 2 the / operator is an ambiguous operator; it'll act like the floor division operator when both operands are integers, but if either operand is a float, then suddenly it behaves differently and returns floating point division results instead. Because both operands in your code are integers, in Python 2 your code would not have thrown that exception.

Your next problem is that downheap() does not return anything, so when you use return downheap(lista, n, 1) in heapsort() you'll return None. I suspect that the return there is a mistake.

share|improve this answer

When dividing just cast to int

def heapsort (lista) :
    n= len(lista)-1
    k= int(n/2)                       // instead of k= n/2 
    while (k>0) :
        downheap(lista,n,k) 
        k-=1 
    while (n>=0) :
        (lista[1]),(lista[n])=(lista[n]),(lista[1]) 
        n-=1 
        return downheap(lista, n, 1) 
    return lista   
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