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I'm trying to mock a method which is called inside another method recursively.

public class ABC
{
    public static Object getSessionAttribute(String value) {
        return Context.current().getHttpSession().getAttribute(value);
    }

    public static String myMethod(String xyz) throws Exception{

        /*Some important business logic*/

        String abc = getSessionAttribute("abcdefghj").toString();

        /*Some important business logic*/

        return abc;
    }

}

My test class is like;

@RunWith(PowerMockRunner.class)
@PrepareForTest(ABC.class)
public class ABCTest {

@Before
public void setUp() throws Exception {

  PowerMockito.mockStatic(ABC.class, Mockito.CALLS_REAL_METHODS);
  PowerMockito.when(ABC.getSessionAttribute("dummyValue")).thenReturn("myReturnValue");

}

    @Test
    public void testmyMethod() throws Exception {

        Assert.assertEquals("anyValue", ABC.myMethod("value"));

    }

}

Here I'm getting a NullPointerException from ** return Context.current().getHttpSession().getAttribute(value)** line. I think it wants me to mock every class starting from Context to .getAttribute. how can I make it work?

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You will either have to mock Context.current() (static mock), Context.getHttpSession() (instance mock), and HttpSession.getAttribute(String) (instance mock) OR you will have to do something like @k3b suggested below. –  Matt Lachman Oct 7 '13 at 12:13

2 Answers 2

Note: I donot know anything about powermock, but i have worked with other mocking-tools.

The problem with your code is that it is tidly coupled to Context.current().getHttpSession()

If you replace Context.current().getHttpSession() with an HttpSession interface and make class-methods non-static it can be easily mocked and tested like this

public class ABC
{
    HttpSession session;
    public ABC(HttpSession session) {
        this.session = session;
    }

    private Object getSessionAttribute(String value) {
        return this.session.getAttribute(value);
    }

    public String myMethod(String xyz) throws Exception{

        /*Some important business logic*/

        String abc = getSessionAttribute("dummyValue").toString();

        /*Some important business logic*/

        return abc;
    }

}

@RunWith(PowerMockRunner.class)
@PrepareForTest(ABC.class)
public class ABCTest {
    HttpSession sessionMock;

    @Before
    public void setUp() throws Exception {
      sessionMock = ... create a mock that implements the interface HttpSession
      PowerMockito
                 .when(sessionMock.getSessionAttribute("dummyValue"))
                 .thenReturn("myReturnValue");
    }

    @Test
    public void testmyMethod() throws Exception {
        ABC sut = new ABC(sessionMock);
        Assert.assertEquals("anyValue", sut.myMethod("value"));
    }
}
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Can you share your imports also in your code? I can mock the Context object for you but I'm not sure which JAR it's part of.

The following code is considered a Java train wreck and it makes unit testing a bit more painful.

return Context.current().getHttpSession().getAttribute(value);

I would suggest refactoring the above code by extracting out local variables. Martin Fowlwer suggestions that also here:

"Mockist testers do talk more about avoiding 'train wrecks' - method chains of style of getThis().getThat().getTheOther(). Avoiding method chains is also known as following the Law of Demeter. While method chains are a smell, the opposite problem of middle men objects bloated with forwarding methods is also a smell."

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