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Is the following correct since IE doesn't support "liner-gradient"?

    background: #f5f7f9; /* Old browsers */
    background: -moz-linear-gradient(top, #f5f7f9 0%, #cdcdcd 100%); /* FF3.6+ */
    background: -webkit-gradient(linear, left top, left bottom, color-stop(0%,#f5f7f9), color-stop(100%,#cdcdcd)); /* Chrome,Safari4+ */
    background: -webkit-linear-gradient(top, #f5f7f9 0%,#cdcdcd 100%); /* Chrome10+,Safari5.1+ */
    background: -o-linear-gradient(top, #f5f7f9 0%,#cdcdcd 100%); /* Opera 11.10+ */
    background: -ms-linear-gradient(top, #f5f7f9 0%,#cdcdcd 100%); /* IE10+ */
    background: linear-gradient(to bottom, #f5f7f9 0%,#cdcdcd 100%); /* W3C */
    background:url(../img/backgrounds/form_bg.png) 0 0 no-repeat;

I am basically offering an image fallback.

This is not working in IE9 and below

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closed as off-topic by Adrift, random, Mario, Dustin, wudzik Mar 3 at 12:37

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question was caused by a problem that can no longer be reproduced or a simple typographical error. While similar questions may be on-topic here, this one was resolved in a manner unlikely to help future readers. This can often be avoided by identifying and closely inspecting the shortest program necessary to reproduce the problem before posting." – random, Mario, Dustin, wudzik
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Don't see why not, have you tested it? –  plvdmeer Oct 1 '13 at 13:31
3  
You might want to add that last line (with the image in it) above your gradients, like this. –  D.Alexander Oct 1 '13 at 13:42
    
This is not working in IE9 and below –  Alex Oct 1 '13 at 14:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

First, put your fallback first in the cascade. Example:

body {
  background: url(http://placekitten.com/500/500) top center #cdcdcd no-repeat;
  background: -moz-linear-gradient(top, #f5f7f9 0%, #cdcdcd 100%); /* FF3.6+ */
  background: -webkit-gradient(linear, left top, left bottom, color-stop(0%,#f5f7f9), color-stop(100%,#cdcdcd)); /* Chrome,Safari4+ */
  background: -webkit-linear-gradient(top, #f5f7f9 0%,#cdcdcd 100%); /* Chrome10+,Safari5.1+ */
  background: -o-linear-gradient(top, #f5f7f9 0%,#cdcdcd 100%); /* Opera 11.10+ */
  background: -ms-linear-gradient(top, #f5f7f9 0%,#cdcdcd 100%); /* IE10+ */
  background: linear-gradient(to bottom, #f5f7f9 0%,#cdcdcd 100%); /* W3C */
}

Modern browsers consider the gradient to be a kind of background image. With the fallback first, browsers that can understand the fallback will use it, and browsers that can understand the other specifications will override the fallback with the gradients. For example, IE7 will only understand the background image, and ignore the gradients. Chrome will do the background image, and then override the background image with the linear-gradient.

Second, -ms-linear-gradient support begins in IE10; it's not supported by IE9, so that's why it doesn't work in IE9 and below.

You can use filters for IE9 through 6. Example:

filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.gradient( startColorstr='#ff3838', endColorstr='#00ffffff',GradientType=0 ); /* IE6-9 */

If you use a filter, you will also need to disable the fallback image, since IE 6 - 9 don't replace background images with filters. I prefer to do this with conditional comments:

<!--[if (gte IE 6)&(lte IE 9)]>
<style type="text/css">
body { background-image: none; }
</style>
<![endif]-->

Note that the conditional comments are HTML.

Last, most sites probably don't need the -moz, -webkit or -o prefixes; each of them has supported the standard linear-gradient for a while.

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