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I've got a string of uppercase letters and numbers that I must 'logically' sort and store in a field in a database. I've got the update/change/inquire part into the database figured out. I'm struggle with logically sorting this string.

Here goes, I hope I can explain this well.

Given this set of strings AB1 AB2 AB3 A11 AB10

I need these to alpha sort like so

A11 AB1 AB2 AB3 AB10

in order to achieve this, I believe I need to explode the string. because currently trying to alpha sort yields A11 AB1 AB10 AB2 AB3

EDIT: I need to be able to store an exploded string and a non exploded string to be able to sort with other programs.

Here is how I think they need to be broken up and stored in order to sort alpha

A11  -  A   11
AB1  -  AB   1
AB2  -  AB   2
AB3  -  AB   3
AB10 -  AB  10

There are some constants. The string will be no larger than 5 positions. It will only contain upper case letters and numbers.

Here is as far as I've gotten with my code. writers block so i'm hoping for some help. I think I need to find if it starts with a letter, then find all the consecutive letters, move those left alight, then go to work on number, finding all the consecutive numbers and move those right aligned. Not sure how something like 'A1B1' would work either...

for(int ii = 0;ii < sectionString.length() && ii< SECTIONSPACES;ii++){
               System.out.print("    Was previous a number? " + isPreviousANumber +         "\n");
try{
    String tmpString = sectionString.substring(ii,ii + 1 );
    int positionInCharArray = Integer.parseInt(tmpString);
    System.out.printf("    Position " + ii + " is number " + positionInCharArray + "\n");
    isPreviousANumber = true;        
}catch(Exception e){
    System.out.printf("    Position " + ii + " number is not a number " +      sectionString.substring(ii,ii) + "\n");
    isPreviousANumber = false;
    }                   
}
share|improve this question
    
Employ something similar to radix sort with digits taking precedence over letters. –  arynaq Oct 1 '13 at 13:42
    
I'll copy a comment I made below These works great for sorting them if I can use java to sort them. The problem is that different programs need to sort them and to be compatible with them, i need to 'explode' the string and use the exploded string to sort and just display the regular value. Not 'normal' i know. In the db there would be two fields, one will be called section and one field called sort_section. Make sense? –  nkuebelbeck Oct 1 '13 at 14:18

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This remark "Not sure how something like 'A1B1' would work either..." somewhat increases the complexity of the problem. The following should work for all cases.

Method:

Divide the string into tokens. A token is either a letter or a consecutive run of digits. Pad each digits-token to five characters with leading spaces. Concatenate the tokens to make the exploded string.

From a 5 character original, the longest exploded string will be 17 characters.

The resulting exploded strings may be sorted by any program, or by a SQL "ORDERED BY" clause.

Examples:

1A1A1   "    1A    1A    1"
11A11   "   11A   11"
1111A   " 1111A"
11111   "11111"
A1      "A    1"
A1B1    "A    1B    1"
A1C     "A    1C"
A2      "A    2"
A2B1    "A    2B    1"
A10     "A   10"
A10B1   "A   10B    1"
A11     "A   11"
AA1     "AA    1"
AB1     "AB    1"
AB2     "AB    2"
AB10    "AB   10"
ABC     "ABC"

Pseudocode:

// original = "section" string
exploded = ""
prevdigits = false
for ii from 1 to length(original) {
   ch = original[ii]
   if (ch is a digit) then {
      if not prevdigits then {
         token = ""
         prevdigits = true
      }
      token = token+ch
   } else { // letter
      if prevdigits then {
         exploded = exploded + spaces(5-length(token)) + token
         prevdigits = false
      }
      exploded = exploded + ch
   }
}

-Al.

share|improve this answer
    
My bad for adding in that last remark. I just figured the same thing out and was coming back to update with my code. –  nkuebelbeck Oct 2 '13 at 12:11

Here is how I sort it using my radix sort idea:

public static String[] radixSort(String[] strings){
    // Pad the strings
    for(int i=0; i<strings.length; i++){
        strings[i] = String.format("%-5s", strings[i]);
    }

    // Radix sort them
    for (int digit = 0; digit < 5; digit++) {
        final int i = digit;
        Arrays.sort(strings, new Comparator<String>() {


            @Override
            public int compare(String o1, String o2) {
                return o1.charAt(i) - o2.charAt(i);
            }
        });
    }

    // Then trim the whitespaces we used to pad

    for (int i = 0; i < strings.length; i++) {
        strings[i] = strings[i].trim();
    }

    return strings;
}

With input

    String[] strings = new String[] { "AB1", "AB2", "AB3", "A11", "AB10" };
    System.out.println(Arrays.toString(radixSort(strings)));

And output

[A11, AB1, AB2, AB3, AB10]

I am not sure this is the most efficient method but it gets the job done.

share|improve this answer
    
These works great for sorting them if I can use java to sort them. The problem is that different programs need to sort them and to be compatible with them, i need to 'explode' them and use the exploded string to sort and just display the regular value. Not 'normal' i know. In the db there would be two fields, one will be called section and one field called sort_section. Make sense? –  nkuebelbeck Oct 1 '13 at 14:17
    
Was not aware of the second requirement, wrapping them in another object like marco suggested would be the way to go then, with added getters or use regex to split the strings I sort into alpha and numeric values. –  arynaq Oct 1 '13 at 14:29
    
that was my bad, I added that requirement into the original post –  nkuebelbeck Oct 1 '13 at 14:30
    
Np :) I tend to forget when I post questions as well. Sometimes I even remember a constraint long after designing something forcing me to do complete rewrites. –  arynaq Oct 1 '13 at 14:31

you could use another class as special representation for your strings. something like this:

public class AlphaNumericString implements Comparable<AlphaNumericString> {
    public final String alphaPart;
    public final Long numericPart;

    public AlphaNumericString(String string) {
        int index = 0;
        while (index < string.length() && !Character.isDigit(string.charAt(index))) {
            index++;
        }

        alphaPart = string.substring(0, index);

        if (index < string.length()) {
            numericPart = new Long(string.substring(index));
        } else {
            numericPart = null;
        }
    }

    @Override
    public int compareTo(AlphaNumericString other) {
        int stringCompareResult = alphaPart != null ? alphaPart.compareTo(other.alphaPart) : -1;

        if (stringCompareResult == 0) {
            return numericPart != null ? numericPart.compareTo(other.numericPart) : -1;
        } else {
            return stringCompareResult;
        }
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return (alphaPart != null ? alphaPart : "") + (numericPart != null ? numericPart : "");
    }
}

You can turn your current strings into this class, sort and convert them back as needed

share|improve this answer

I would complete these strings with spaces to 5 symbols and after that would make Radix Sort . We can compare all symbols as chars.

    String[] array = {"A11", "AB1", "AB2", "AB3", "AB10"};

    int i, j, length;
    for (i = 0; i < array.length; i++) {
        length = array[i].length();
        for (j = length; j < 5; j++) {
            array[i] += " ";
        }
    }

    Arrays.sort(array);

    for (int k = 0; k<array.length; k++)
        System.out.println(array[k]);
share|improve this answer

Here is my code. I'm sure it can be streamlined, it was one of those blackout moments where i had a brain child and needed to write. This would not work if the string of numbers was over 5 characters long...

updated:less ugly

private String buildPieceSortNumber(String pieceNumber){
    final int INTSPACES = 5;
    final String SPACE = " ";
    String explodedSection = "";        
    char[] charArray = pieceNumber.toCharArray();
    String ints = "";
    for(int i = 0;i < charArray.length;i++){
        if(Character.isDigit(charArray[i])){
            //add to the int string
            ints += charArray[i];
            //check if the next character in the array is a number
            int nextChar = i + 1;
            //make sure we don't go past the end of the string                
            if(nextChar < charArray.length){
                if(!Character.isDigit(charArray[nextChar])){
                    //end of numbers, take ints string, and add padding up to five positions
                    while(ints.length() < INTSPACES){
                        ints = SPACE + ints;
                    }
                    //add the int string to the end of the exploded string
                    explodedSection += ints;                        
                    //clear the int string 
                    ints = "";
                    }
            }else{
                //end of numbers, take ints string, and add padding up to five positions
                while(ints.length() < INTSPACES){
                    ints = SPACE + ints;
                }
                //add the int string to the end of the exploded string
                explodedSection += ints;
                //clear the int string 
                ints = "";
            }                
        }else{
            explodedSection += charArray[i];                                                            
        }
    }
    return explodedSection;
share|improve this answer

Do you really need to sort the data before putting it in the database? Consider letting the database do the work for you.

Suppose you wrote the value straight into the database. Your database might allow you to do something like mine does. In DB2, to get only letters, I would translate all the digits to spaces, and then remove all the spaces. The same concept can apply to getting only digits.

SELECT replace(translate(inp, @spaces, @digits),' ','') as alpha, 
       int(replace(translate(inp, @spaces, @letters),' ','')) as nbr,
       ....

While this might be a normalized database approach, you might question performing this calculation every time data is retrieved from the table. So instead, do this when writing the the data into the table

INSERT INTO yourtable ( item, alpha, nbr, ..... )
     VALUES (inp,
             replace(translate(inp, @spaces, @digits),' ',''),
             int(replace(translate(inp, @spaces, @letters),' ','')),
             .....
            )

To my view, this is simpler logic, less code, easier to test / debug, helping reduce risks of defects, and being easier for someone to maintain. Of course your mileage may vary depending on your database. But this approach seems worth consideration.

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