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Are there any ways to define standalone inner classes in Java?

NB: I need not "partial" classes as in C#, I need full classes, but inner.

Are there any plans to introduce such syntax in future Javas?

package tests.java;

public class Try_InnerClassStandalone_01 {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        Outer O1 = new Outer(12);
        Outer O2 = new Outer(13);

        Outer.Inner i1 = O1.new Inner();
        System.out.println(i1.getData());

        InnerExt i2 = O1.new InnerExt();
        System.out.println(i2.getData());

    }
}

class Outer {

    class Inner {
        int getData() {
            return data;
        }
    }

    public int data;

    public Outer(int data) {
        this.data = data;
    }
}

class InnerExt extends Outer.Inner {

}

UPDATE

I know what is the difference between static and non-static inner classes. And I want to utilize the advantages and avoid disadvantages.

Advantage is the ability to refer Outer.this implicitly (shorter code).

Disadvantage is the necessity to put inner class into the boundaries of outer class definition (no modularity).

share|improve this question
    
Why? Apparently no difference between i1 and i2. In both cases outer instance is provided during construction. – Dims Oct 1 '13 at 13:53
    
I want no static, I need inner and non-static. I require hidden outer class instance. – Dims Oct 1 '13 at 13:53
2  
What are you trying to achieve? – SimonC Oct 1 '13 at 13:57
    
The most important reason to do this is probably to tie an instance of an inner class to an instance of the outer one. If an instance of class A created in the context of an instance of class B can only be used correctly in that same context, then A should logically be an inner class of B. Convenient access to B's fields and methods is a nice side benefit. I'm currently writing a small simulation; logically, a bunch of classes should be inner classes, but there's way too much code to want to shove it all in one file. Oh well. – dfeuer Apr 22 '14 at 1:05

Try this:

class Outer {
    static class Inner {
        // ...
    }
}

Instances of a non-static inner class have an implicit reference to an instance of their enclosing class. If you want what I suspect what you mean with a "stand-alone inner class", you should make the inner class static.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, instances of "non-static inner class have an implicit reference to an instance of their enclosing class". This is what I want. So, your suggestion to use static classes does not match. – Dims Oct 1 '13 at 13:57
    
It is important to realize that static has no other implication, than being independent to the outer class (no Outer.this). – Joop Eggen Oct 1 '13 at 13:57
    
I want Outer.this – Dims Oct 1 '13 at 13:59
    
What do you mean with a "stand-alone inner class"? – Jesper Oct 1 '13 at 14:00
2  
I've never heard of plans to include this feature in a future version of Java, so I wouldn't count on this being included anytime soon. Note that non-static inner classes can directly access member variables of the enclosing class. That would look weird if the inner class was in a separate source file. – Jesper Oct 1 '13 at 14:07

You can't do this

class InnerExt extends Outer.Inner {

}

Because Inner is only relevant in the context of an Outer instance. You cannot extend it outside the context of Outer. Like you could do

class Outer {
    class Inner {

    }
    class InnerExt extends Inner {

    }
}

Otherwise you need to make Inner a static class. You could then extend it in the scope of its visibility.

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