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I have added a feature to my app where the user can change the color scheme, and so I need to change the colors of labels on the screen. I am doing this by looping through the UIView, and if I find a label, I change the color.

This works fine, but I don't want to change the color of labels that are part of segmentedControls, or that appear in the navigation bar.

My question is, how can I tell if a UILabel is actually embedded within a control, so that I can skip it? This code does not work for me:

      if([v isKindOfClass:[UILabel class]] && ![v.superview isKindOfClass:[UISegmentedControl class]] )
        {
            UILabel *label = (UILabel *)v;
            [label setTextColor:[UIColor blackColor]];
        }
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I made a UISegmentedControl and stopped in the debugger, then called the recursiveDescription method on it (recursiveDescription is a private method, but it's made available for use in iOS Debugging Magic). It revealed that the labels in the UISegmentedControl are actually UISegmentLabels, which based on your code turning them black must be a subclass of UILabel. The reason your code didn't work is that their direct superview is apparently a UISegment, a private class used to implement UISegmentedControl.

<UISegmentedControl: 0x8e30130; frame = (99 114; 123 29); opaque = NO; autoresize = RM+BM; layer = <CALayer: 0x8e30250>>
   | <UISegment: 0x8e304a0; frame = (62 0; 61 29); opaque = NO; layer = <CALayer: 0x8e305f0>>
   |    | <UISegmentLabel: 0x8e309d0; frame = (7 6; 47 16); text = 'Second'; clipsToBounds = YES; opaque = NO; userInteractionEnabled = NO; layer = <CALayer: 0x8e30ae0>>
   |    | <UIImageView: 0x8e32510; frame = (61 0; 1 1); alpha = 0; opaque = NO; autoresize = LM; userInteractionEnabled = NO; tag = -1030; layer = <CALayer: 0x8e325e0>>
   | <UISegment: 0x8e34bf0; frame = (0 0; 61 29); opaque = NO; layer = <CALayer: 0x8e34410>>
   |    | <UISegmentLabel: 0x8e34d30; frame = (17 6; 27 16); text = 'First'; clipsToBounds = YES; opaque = NO; userInteractionEnabled = NO; layer = <CALayer: 0x8e34e60>>
   |    | <UIImageView: 0x8e149e0; frame = (61 0; 1 1); alpha = 0; opaque = NO; autoresize = LM; userInteractionEnabled = NO; tag = -1030; layer = <CALayer: 0x8e0ba60>>

There are a few roads you can take:

  1. You can check for the superview being of class UISegment, which is not recommended because it is relying on unstable private API
  2. You can not change the color if the view is of class UISegmentLabel, which is not recommended because it is relying on unstable private API
  3. You can check the whole (or atleast several parts) of the superview chain. I have a Cocoapod, MTRecursiveKVC, which would allow you to write code to do this:

    // Recursively gets the superview property until it is nil 
    NSArray *superviewChain = [view recursiveValueForKey:@"superview"]; 
    // Now iterate through the array, checking for a view being a UISegmentedControl
    

    As long as you are only iterating through the superviews of UILabels you should be ok performance-wise, but note that handrolling your own solution would be faster (my approach is more generic because it uses KVC, but that adds overhead vs pure method calls, and also yours could break out of the loop as soon as it found a UISegmentedControl superview).

  4. (Recommended approach)You could reverse your looping approach. If you start with the UIWindow (or a sufficiently high view) of your app, you could transcend down the hierarchy, and only pursue a branch further if it doesn't have a UISegmentedControl. Here's what that would look like if it was implemented as a category on UIView (I didn't actually test this...)

    - (void)changeColorOfSubviews
    {
        if ([self isKindOfClass:[UILabel class]]) { /* change color */ }
    
        for (UIView *subview in self.subviews) {
            if (![subview isKindOfClass:[UISegmentedControl class]]) {
                [subview changeColorOfSubviews];
            }
        }
    }
    

#4 is my recommended approach because I find the recursion a very natural fit to the tree structure of UIViews, and because I already gave you the code for it :)

Here's a diagram illustrating approach number 4, in which black paths are followed, red paths are where we stop following a branch, and gray paths are never evaluated (because we reached red before we got there):

enter image description here

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Excellent discussion and solution. I understand the concept, and the recursion, I'm just having a hard time understanding exactly where I would call the first changeColorOfSubviews. And then, how would the subviews have access to changeColorOfSubviews? –  Andrew Smith Oct 3 '13 at 18:35
    
Objective-C has a feature called categories where you can add methods to any class, including already defined ones like UIView. What you would do is in Xcode, choose File > New File > Category and set 'Category on' to UIView. Then add the changeColorOfSubviews method in your new category file. You would first call changeColorOfSubviews on the UIWindow your app uses (UIWindow is a subclass of UIView, so it gets your category method, too). You typically access the window from a property on your App Delegate, or from the keyWindow property of UIApplication. –  MaxGabriel Oct 4 '13 at 1:52
1  
Works perfectly!And I've learned about Categories. –  Andrew Smith Oct 4 '13 at 13:45
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For completeness, here is my final code. Thanks again to MaxGabriel for the answer.

New file, Objective-C Category (UIView)

//  UIView+UIMods.m
//  ATB iPad
//
//  Created by A Smith on 10/4/13.
//
//

#import "UIView+UIMods.h"
#import "Colors.h"

    - (void)changeColorOfLabels:(int)hiContrast
{
    if ([self isKindOfClass:[UILabel class]]) {     // if we are currently in a UILabel view
        /* change color */
        UILabel *label = (UILabel *)self;
        NSString *ver = [UIDevice currentDevice].systemVersion;
        int majorVer = [ver integerValue];

        if( hiContrast ){

            if( ![label.superview isKindOfClass:[UIButton class]]  ){

                [label setTextColor:[UIColor blackColor]];
                [label setBackgroundColor:[UIColor whiteColor]];

            } else {

                if( majorVer >= 7 ){
                    [label setTextColor:[Colors iOS7ButtonColor]];
                }

            }

        } else {

            if(  ![label.superview isKindOfClass:[UIButton class]]  ){
                [label setTextColor:[UIColor whiteColor]];
                [label setBackgroundColor:[Colors darkBkgColor]];
            } else {
                if( majorVer >= 7 ){
                    [label setTextColor:[Colors iOS7ButtonColor]];
                }
            }

        }
    }

    for (UIView *subview in self.subviews) {

        if (![subview isKindOfClass:[UISegmentedControl class]] && ![subview.superview isKindOfClass:[UITextField class]]  ) {

            [subview changeColorOfLabels:hiContrast];       // only recurse down if it's the type of view we want to modify the label for
        }
    }
}

And the .h file:

@interface UIView (UIMods){

}

- (void)changeColorOfLabels:(int)hiContrast;

@end

And it's called like this,

UIView *aView = theView.view;
[aView changeColorOfLabels:globalHighContrast];

A nice suggestion that I saw is to add the .h file import to the .pch file, so that this addition is available everywhere, you don't have to import anything locally.

#ifdef __OBJC__
    #import <Foundation/Foundation.h>
    #import <UIKit/UIKit.h>
    #import "UIView+UIMods.h"
#endif
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