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I'm doing an encryption program, my professor told me that this program is correct, but my logic in the switch statement is wrong, because of inputting the encryption value one by one.. my professor wants me to put it in a variable first then display it on the encryption value .. please help me out ..

#include<iostream.h>
#include<conio.h>
#include<string.h>
#include<windows.h>
#include<cstdlib>

main()
{
const char *stringlength;
char input[100];
int i;

cout<<"Input letters only:";
cin>>input;
stringlength=input;
cout<<"\nEncryption Value:";
for(i=0; i<strlen(stringlength); i++)
{

    switch(input[i])
    {
    case 'a':cout<<"0";break;
    case 'A':cout<<"1";break;
    case 'e':cout<<"2";break;
    case 'E':cout<<"3";break;
    case 'i':cout<<"4";break;
    case 'I':cout<<"5";break;
    case 'o':cout<<"6";break;
    case 'O':cout<<"7";break;
    case 'u':cout<<"8";break;
    case 'U':cout<<"9";break;
    case 'B':cout<<"C";break;
    case 'C':cout<<"D";break;
    case 'D':cout<<"E";break;
    case 'F':cout<<"G";break;
    case 'G':cout<<"H";break;
    case 'H':cout<<"I";break;
    case 'J':cout<<"K";break;
    case 'K':cout<<"L";break;
    case 'L':cout<<"M";break;
    case 'M':cout<<"N";break;
    case 'N':cout<<"O";break;
    case 'P':cout<<"Q";break;
    case 'Q':cout<<"R";break;
    case 'R':cout<<"S";break;
    case 'S':cout<<"T";break;
    case 'T':cout<<"U";break;
    case 'V':cout<<"W";break;
    case 'W':cout<<"X";break;
    case 'X':cout<<"Y";break;
    case 'Y':cout<<"Z";break;
    case 'Z':cout<<"A";break;
    case 'b':cout<<"c";break;
    case 'c':cout<<"d";break;
    case 'd':cout<<"e";break;
    case 'f':cout<<"g";break;
    case 'g':cout<<"h";break;
    case 'h':cout<<"i";break;
    case 'j':cout<<"k";break;
    case 'k':cout<<"l";break;
    case 'l':cout<<"m";break;
    case 'm':cout<<"n";break;
    case 'n':cout<<"o";break;
    case 'p':cout<<"q";break;
    case 'q':cout<<"r";break;
    case 'r':cout<<"s";break;
    case 's':cout<<"t";break;
    case 't':cout<<"u";break;
    case 'v':cout<<"w";break;
    case 'w':cout<<"x";break;
    case 'x':cout<<"y";break;
    case 'y':cout<<"z";break;
    case 'z':cout<<"a";break;
    default : cout<<"\nInvalid Character!\n"; break;
    }
}
getch();
return 0;
}

What can I do with that? my hint is that I need a variable where I can put all the encryption value of the text, then cout it all at once.

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7  
Never thought I'd see turboc++ and c++11 in the same tag list. –  StoryTeller Oct 1 '13 at 14:15
    
Do you know how to iterate over an array? Do you know how to put values into an array? What's the problem? –  Beta Oct 1 '13 at 14:25
    
Just that you notify, in c++ you won't get that fast in trouble as in c, but you are just allowed to place 16384 case labels into a switch statement. (In C the implemantation limit for it is set to 1023) –  Zaibis Oct 1 '13 at 14:38
    
Not meaning to demoralize you too much, but this is an ultra-poor implementation of an ultra-poor encryption scheme. Unless the assignment is "learn to use the switch statement", you should consider using an array to look up the substituted characters. Way less complexity, much easier to read and modify (as in "change key"), and faster. –  Damon Oct 1 '13 at 14:52
1  
What happens if I have a sticky key on my keyboard, and input 1000 'a'? (Moral: don't use char[] for this, but std::string. Even if I have a file with 2GB of 'a', it will blow up in a controlled way.) –  James Kanze Oct 1 '13 at 14:56

3 Answers 3

Use a C++ std::string as you output and add every cypherred character to it. Instead of cout << 'c' use str += 'c'; Then just dump the whole string.

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Use string streams in C++.

#include <sstream>
#include <string>

Put this in your main function declarations:

std::stringstream ss; 

Following in switch case:

case 'a':ss<<"0";break;
case 'A':ss<<"1";break;
case 'e':ss<<"2";break;
case 'E':ss<<"3";break;
case 'i':ss<<"4";break;
case 'I':ss<<"5";break;
case 'o':ss<<"6";break;
... 

Finally read stream into the string output and print -

std::string output = ss.str(); 
cout << output << "\n";
share|improve this answer
    
I modified your code to be a bit ... better. I hope you don't mind. Your version would have broken on a space in ss. –  rubenvb Oct 1 '13 at 14:26
    
Thanks @rubenvb –  Manoj Awasthi Oct 1 '13 at 14:27
1  
That's really abuse of std::stringstream (which should be std::ostringstream here anyway). –  James Kanze Oct 1 '13 at 14:45

Your prof is probably looking for char output[100]. That's about as bad as char input[100], for the reasons that James Kanze explained, but your professor seems stuck in the previous century. This kind of code is what causes hackers.

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