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I m trying to implement something in f# that I already have in c# to see how much more succinct the syntax is. I used an option pricing formula (Black 76) as test because this seems like a functional problem to me. All seems fine but I have trouble computing the implied vol as I need to call a method of the same class from within. Here is what I have so far:

module Module1
open System

type Black76 (CallPutFlag, Fwd, Strike, time, rf, vol, ?BlackPrice:float) =
    let d1 = (Math.Log(Fwd / Strike) + (vol * vol * 0.5) * time) / (vol * Math.Sqrt(time))
    let d2 = d1 - vol * Math.Sqrt(time)
    let n = new MathNet.Numerics.Distributions.Normal()
    member x.valuation =
        match CallPutFlag with
        | "c" | "C" | "Call" | "call"  -> Math.Exp(-rf * time) * (Fwd * n.InverseCumulativeDistribution(d1) - Strike * n.InverseCumulativeDistribution(d2))
        | "p" | "P" | "Put" | "put" -> Math.Exp(-rf * time) * (Strike * n.InverseCumulativeDistribution(-d2)- Fwd * n.InverseCumulativeDistribution(-d1))
        | _ -> failwith "Unrecognized option type"

member x.delta =
    match CallPutFlag with
    | "c" | "C" | "Call" | "call"  -> Math.Exp(-rf * time) * n.InverseCumulativeDistribution(d1) 
    | "p" | "P" | "Put" | "put" -> Math.Exp(-rf * time) *  n.InverseCumulativeDistribution(-d1)
    | _ -> failwith "Unrecognized option type"
member x.gamma =
    Math.Exp(-rf * time) * (n.Density(d1) / (Fwd * vol * Math.Sqrt(time)))

member x.vega =
    Math.Exp(-rf * time) * n.Density(d1) * Fwd * Math.Sqrt(time)

member x.rho = 
    match CallPutFlag with
    | "c" | "C" | "Call" | "call"  -> time * Strike * Math.Sqrt(-rf * time) * n.InverseCumulativeDistribution(d2)
    | "p" | "P" | "Put" | "put" -> -time * Strike * Math.Sqrt(-rf * time) * n.InverseCumulativeDistribution(-d2)
    | _ -> failwith "Unrecognized option type"

member x.theta =
    match CallPutFlag with
    | "c" | "C" | "Call" | "call"  -> -(Fwd * vol * n.Density(d1)) / (2.0 * Math.Sqrt(time))  - rf * Strike * Math.Sqrt(-rf * time) * n.InverseCumulativeDistribution(d2)
    | "p" | "P" | "Put" | "put" -> -(Fwd * vol * n.Density(d1)) / (2.0 * Math.Sqrt(time))  + rf * Strike * Math.Sqrt(-rf * time) * n.InverseCumulativeDistribution(-d2)
    | _ -> failwith "Unrecognized option type"

member x.impliedvol =
    let vst = Math.Sqrt(2.0*Math.Abs((Math.Log(Fwd/Strike)+rf*time)/time))
    let tol = 0.0001
    let mutable v = vst
    let mutable sigmadiff = 1.0
    let mutable k = 1
    let kmax = 100
    while (sigmadiff >= tol && k < kmax) do
        let option = Black76.valuation(CallPutFlag, Fwd, Strike, time, rf, v)
        let cvega = Black76.vega(CallPutFlag, Fwd, Strike, time, rf, v)
        let increment = (option - BlackPrice) / cvega
        v <- v - increment
        k < - k + 1
        sigmadiff = Math.Abs(increment)
    v

This all works apart from the implied vol function. Also it does not seem to be much more succinct than the c# version. Could you please let me know how I can call the method from within for the implied vol funcitons? Also do you know how to get rid of the let mutable (after all you are not supposed to use this in fsharp (I think). thanks

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What is sth? _ _ –  Stephen Swensen Oct 1 '13 at 15:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you want to make the code more succinct and more functional, then I would probably try to restructure it a bit more. I think something along these lines below should work.

First of all, you definitely don't want to repeat the matching on strings, so I'd define a discriminated union to capture the kinds of computations (you can then parse the string just once):

type CallPutFlag = Call | Put

Next, we can define record to keep the results of the equation (I added just the things that you were using, but you would probably want to add more here):

type Black76Results =  { Vega : float; Valuation : float }

Now, I think it makes good sense to separate the black76 function from the implied volatility. The black76 function can run the calculation for given inputs and return the results as a value of Black76Results record:

let black76 flag fwd strike time rf vol = 
  let d1 = (Math.Log(fwd / strike) + (vol * vol * 0.5) * time) / (vol * Math.Sqrt(time))
  let d2 = d1 - vol * Math.Sqrt(time)
  let n = new MathNet.Numerics.Distributions.Normal()
  match flag with
  | Call ->
      let valuation = Math.Exp(-rf * time) * (fwd * n.InverseCumulativeDistribution(d1) - strike * n.InverseCumulativeDistribution(d2))
      let delta = Math.Exp(-rf * time) * n.InverseCumulativeDistribution(d1) 
      let gamma = Math.Exp(-rf * time) * (n.Density(d1) / (fwd * vol * Math.Sqrt(time)))
      let vega = Math.Exp(-rf * time) * n.Density(d1) * fwd * Math.Sqrt(time)
      let rho = time * strike * Math.Sqrt(-rf * time) * n.InverseCumulativeDistribution(d2)
      let theta = -(fwd * vol * n.Density(d1)) / (2.0 * Math.Sqrt(time))  - rf * strike * Math.Sqrt(-rf * time) * n.InverseCumulativeDistribution(d2)
      { Vega = vega; Valuation = valuation }       
  | Put -> 
      failwith "TODO: Similar for Put"

Although there is some shared code in Call and Put, I think it looks a lot more readable when you separate the two into different branches (you could still extract common pieces of code into a separate function).

Now, impliedVol is simply a function that calls black76 repeatedly:

let impliedVol flag fwd strike time rf blackPrice = 
  let vst = Math.Sqrt(2.0*Math.Abs((Math.Log(fwd/strike)+rf*time)/time))
  let tol = 0.0001
  let mutable v = vst
  let mutable sigmadiff = 1.0
  let mutable k = 1
  let kmax = 100
  while (sigmadiff >= tol && k < kmax) do
      let b = black76 flag fwd strike time rf v
      let option = b.Valuation
      let cvega = b.Vega
      let increment = (option - blackPrice) / cvega
      v <- v - increment
      k <- k + 1
      sigmadiff <- Math.Abs(increment)
  v
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Tomas! Do I not need to specify the parameters in the Class Black76Results? –  nik Oct 1 '13 at 15:15
    
Black76Results is an F# record - you can think of it as an anonymous type in C#, except that it is named :-). It does not need to know about the input parameters, because it is used just to store the results (so that you can return both vega and valuation from your function). If you needed this for some reason, you could keep the parameters in the result too - but I don't think you need to do that. (On the other hand, you could define another record to keep all the inputs so that your function has fewer arguments) –  Tomas Petricek Oct 1 '13 at 15:22
    
Check out this post: fsharpforfunandprofit.com/posts/records –  Tomas Petricek Oct 1 '13 at 15:22

So your problem is the lines:

let option = Black76.valuation(CallPutFlag, Fwd, Strike, time, rf, v)
let cvega = Black76.vega(CallPutFlag, Fwd, Strike, time, rf, v)

Your trying to call them on the type Black76, when they're instance members of an object of type Black76. You should use x.valuation(...) instead, (x because that's what you've called your this variable).

F# doesn't have a fixed keyword for what in C# is known as this. Instead when you declare a member you give any name you want before the dot.

member this.method_name =
member x.another_method = 
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1  
Also, he probably wants member val so each property is only computed once. As is, they will be computed on each access. –  Daniel Oct 1 '13 at 15:02
    
This will not really help, because the OP needs to run the calculation with different values of v - so it is not just calling a method of the current instance. –  Tomas Petricek Oct 1 '13 at 15:03
1  
exactly Tomas, I need to call the method and overwrite one of the parameters, I should have made that more clear –  nik Oct 1 '13 at 15:04
2  
You could write let b = Black76(CallPutFlag, Fwd, Strike, time, rf, v) to create a new instance with modified parameters and then use b.valuation and b.vega to access the properties of this new instance, but I think restructuring the code a bit more makes it much nicer. –  Tomas Petricek Oct 1 '13 at 15:16
2  
@nik You can always write a type that wraps the function and exposes it in a nice way to Excel. But if you want to benefit from the functional style, then the best way is to write the core functionality in the functional style and then just encapsulate it in classes when needed. –  Tomas Petricek Oct 1 '13 at 15:23

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