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Hi Everyone,

I'm working on a little jQuery, and trying my hand at fading out & in a single element.

What I am trying to achieve from this is to fade a HTML button element out when it is clicked, replacing the text inside, and then fading the button back in with the new text. But when I add the fadeOut(); & fadeIn(); functions to only the first click handler, it creates a fading out/in loop for each time the mouse is clicked. I would only like the first click to fade out & in the button element.

This code is only for experimenting on & as I am only just learning about jQuery, it is not that important if i cant find an answer to this problem. This question is only out of curiosity as to if you can somehow stop the effects from looping.

HTML Code:

<!doctype html>
<html lang="en">
<head>
<title>jQuery Test</title>
<meta name="description" content="jQuery Test">
<meta name="author" content="Shannon">
<meta charset="utf-8">
<link rel="stylesheet" href="">
<script type="text/javascript" src="jquery-1.10.2.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript" src="script.js"></script>
</head>
<body>
<button type="button">Click Me</button>
</body>
</html>

jQuery Code: (Before Fading Effect Is Added)

$(document).ready(function(){
    $("button").click(function(){
        $("button").text("You clicked me!");
    $("button").click(function(){
        $("button").text("You clicked me again!!");
    $("button").click(function(){
        $("button").text("You clicked me 3 times!!!");
    });
    });
    });
});

jQuery Code: (After Fading Effect Is Added)

$(document).ready(function(){
    $("button").click(function(){
        $("button").fadeOut();
        $("button").text("You clicked me!");
        $("button").fadeIn();
    $("button").click(function(){
        $("button").text("You clicked me again!!");
    $("button").click(function(){
        $("button").text("You clicked me 3 times!!!");
    });
    });
    });
});

Thanks for taking time to read my question, and forgive me if i break any rules on asking questions as this is my first time

--

Edit:

Thank you all for replying to my question so fast. You all deserve praise on your efforts and knowledge on jQuery. As you can tell, I am still quite a Novice with a long way to go...

--

share|improve this question
1  
Are you saying the first code example somehow works as intended ? –  adeneo Oct 1 '13 at 15:08
2  
You are binding multiple click events... in both the cases adding 1 click during each click.. jsfiddle.net/BM7qg. Use on and off or change your logic. –  PSL Oct 1 '13 at 15:09
    
Thank you PSL! Your code snippet works great :) –  Shannon Horcicka Oct 1 '13 at 15:14
    
@ShannonHorcicka if you really want text to change after fadeOut is complete and then fadeIn to happen, use the call back like this jsfiddle.net/evEus. Here is right way, dont repeat button inside the handler, –  PSL Oct 1 '13 at 15:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

One solution is to use on and off to attach/detach the clicks:

http://jsfiddle.net/82H9A/1/

$(document).ready(function () {
    $("button").on('click',function () {
        $("button").off('click');
        $("button").fadeOut(function () {
            $("button").text("You clicked me!");
            $("button").fadeIn();
        });
        $("button").on('click', function () {
            $("button").off('click');
            $("button").text("You clicked me again!!");
            $("button").click(function () {
                $("button").text("You clicked me 3 times!!!");
            });
        });
    });
});

I also set the text and fade in after the fadeout completes...

As it was a poor use of selectors, almost exactly like PSLs first example, I will publish a cleaner version:

http://jsfiddle.net/82H9A/3/

$(document).ready(function () {
    $("button").on('click',function () {
        var $button = $(this);
        $button.off('click');
        $button.fadeOut(function () {
            $button.text("You clicked me!");
            $button.fadeIn();
        });
        $button.on('click', function () {
            $button.off('click');
            $button.text("You clicked me again!!");
            $button.click(function () {
                $button.text("You clicked me 3 times!!!");
            });
        });
    });
});

Disclaimer:

While this code is almost identical to what PSL came up with at the same time, but now chooses to complain about, I agree this is a really bad example of how to use selectors. The repeated use of $("button") is for demo purposes only and should not by attempted by anyone except a trained stunt-coder :)

share|improve this answer
1  
Great Answer! Thank you –  Shannon Horcicka Oct 1 '13 at 15:25
    
This solution is not proper because selector is ambiguous and too generic.. Check the issue here, jsfiddle.net/BDfj7 click on one button and then click on the other. It should ideally be like jsfiddle.net/evEus –  PSL Oct 1 '13 at 15:29
    
Yep, the code in the last link seems understandable. –  Shannon Horcicka Oct 1 '13 at 15:33
1  
Haha, Trained Stunt Coder - Nice touch :) –  Shannon Horcicka Oct 1 '13 at 15:38
1  
Oh God, are those event handlers inside event handlers ? –  adeneo Oct 1 '13 at 16:10

You want to use a callback function from the first fadeOut or the text will change whilst the fadeOut is happening.

$('button').click(function(){
    $('button').fadeOut(function(){
        $(this).text('You Clicked me!').fadeIn();
    });
});

See it working here: http://jsfiddle.net/6kSxg/1/

share|improve this answer
$(document).ready(function(){
    $("button").on('click', function(){
        var self  = $(this),
            speed = 500,
            numb  = self.data('numb')?self.data('numb'):0,
            txt   = {
                1:'You clicked me!',
                2:'You clicked me again!!',
                3:'You clicked me 3 times!!!'
            };
        (function(f) {
            $.when( self.stop(true,true).fadeOut(speed) ).always(function() {
                self.text(txt[f]).fadeIn(speed);
            });
        })(++numb);
        self.data('numb', numb = numb > 2 ? 0 : numb);
    });
});

FIDDLE

share|improve this answer
    
Self executing function... Constants for speed... Use of data for variable storage... Anonymous object creation for string storage... Conditional operators... JQuery Promises... Chaining... A for effort, but I think the aim was to clarify something very simple for a newbie, not bury him with cool Javascript/JQuery features. Even I have trouble reading this one :) –  TrueBlueAussie Oct 1 '13 at 16:20
    
@TrueBlueAussie - Thank you, yes I know, it's great! –  adeneo Oct 1 '13 at 17:12
    
Well putting both the language & library together does seem a little bit to much for me to handle, but it does look quite smart :) –  Shannon Horcicka Oct 1 '13 at 17:42
    
@adeneo: Er, no. Readability is generally of greater importance. Funny enough though, PSL feels my own really really simple answer requires a detailed explanation and deserved a down-vote (good thing he has not looked at yours!). –  TrueBlueAussie Oct 1 '13 at 17:51
1  
@TrueBlueAussie - The readabilty of this is great, it's not hard to read at all, the variables are all appropriately named, the jQuery functions speaks for themselves, and the promise is simply because using stop() will cause the built in callback in fadeOut not to trigger. In my opinion this is the way to do it, as event handlers inside event handlers makes me feel dizzy. –  adeneo Oct 1 '13 at 17:56

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