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Here's the code:

a = [1,2,3,4]
b = {}
b[1] = 10
b[2] = 8
b[3] = 7
b[4] = 5
print max(a,key=lambda w: b[w])

This prints out 1.

I don't understand how max(a,key=lambda w: b[w]) is being evaluated here though; I'm guessing for each value i in a, it finds the corresponding value b[i] by

  1. saving the current value of i as w in the lambda function
  2. getting the corresponding value from b[i] and storing it in key.

But then why does it print out 1 instead of 11? Or why doesn't it print out 10, since that's really the maximum number?

share|improve this question
    
Almost afraid to ask, but why did you imagine it might produce 11? 1 + 10? –  John Machin Dec 16 '09 at 20:45
    
Exactly. My mistake. –  Vlad the Impala Dec 16 '09 at 21:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

max(a,...) is always going to return an element of a. So the result will be either 1,2,3, or 4. For each value w in a, the key value is b[w]. The largest key value is 10, and that corresponds with w equalling 1. So max(a,key=lambda w: b[w]) returns 1.

share|improve this answer

Try:

a = [1,2,3,4]
b = {}
b[1] = 10
b[2] = 8
b[3] = 7
b[4] = 5
c = a + b.values()
print max(*c)
share|improve this answer
    
that's so bad, I don't even want to downvote it. –  SilentGhost Dec 16 '09 at 12:52
    
why is bad? you can also do the same without concatenate the values if a and b are huge. –  enrnpfnfp Dec 16 '09 at 12:56
1  
because it's so far from what OP is trying to do, that it's just frustrating –  SilentGhost Dec 16 '09 at 13:03
1  
-1 is warranted just for the max(*c) –  John Machin Dec 16 '09 at 13:44
1  
@Goose Bumper: if c refers to [1, 42, 666] then max(*c) is equivalent to max(1, 42, 666) (see http://docs.python.org/reference/expressions.html#calls). My downvote is because that is obscure and inefficient as well; max(c) gives the same result (see http://docs.python.org/library/functions.html#max). –  John Machin Dec 16 '09 at 20:39

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