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I'm trying to create a table called Order using MySQL and MariaDB. I've stripped down everything except an id for the table. If I change the table name to something like Test, it works, but creating the table as Order, 'Order', or "Order" does not work.

SQL:

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS Order ( 
    id int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY 
) ENGINE = InnoDB;

Error message:

ERROR 1064 (42000): You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MariaDB server version for the right syntax to use near 'Order ( id int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY ) ENGINE = InnoDB' at line 1

But this works:

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS Test ( 
    id int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY 
) ENGINE = InnoDB;

MySQL version output:

mysql  Ver 15.1 Distrib 5.5.33a-MariaDB, for debian-linux-gnu (x86_64) using readline 5.1
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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Use backticks, because order is a reserved word:

 CREATE TABLE `Order` ....

or better, don't do this. It will create confusion.

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Thanks, that's what I needed. I understood that it was a reserved word but I was unfamiliar to how to use it (I guess I didn't realize it was backticks that were used in other postings). I don't normally name tables like this, but I'm following along with a class that had some SQL examples of Customer and Order relationships, and I wanted to create it on my own and ran into this issue. –  making3 Oct 1 '13 at 15:35

It's a reserved word. See the list of reserved words at http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.5/en/reserved-words.html

If you need to use a reserved word as a table name or column name, put it in back quotes. But you're better off avoiding reserved words, because they will cause much confusion and many mistakes in the future.

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