Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

By default, copying from the command prompt will prompt you to overwrite files that already exist in the target location.

You can add "/Y" to say "Yes to all" replacements.

But how can you say "No to all" ?

In other words, I want to copy everything from one directory that does not already exist in the target.

The closest thing I see is the XCOPY argument to only copy things after a specific mod-datetime.

share|improve this question

10 Answers 10

up vote 44 down vote accepted

Unless there's a scenario where you'd not want to copy existing files in the source that have changed since the last copy, why not use XCOPY with /D without specifying a date?

share|improve this answer

You can make a text file with a single long line of "n" then run your command and put < nc.txt after it. I did this to copy over 145,000 instances where "No overwrite" was what I wanted and it worked fine this way.

Or you can just hold the n key down with something, but that takes longer than using the < to pipe it in.

share|improve this answer
1  
whoa! almost humorous –  kurast Jan 8 '10 at 19:33
8  
+1 for lolfactor. Also +1 because this is more efficient than Liam's solution which some how got +3... –  Matt Crinklaw-Vogt Aug 5 '10 at 14:29
echo "No" | copy/-Y c:\source c:\Dest\
share|improve this answer
    
amazing, it works for all the files.. you can do echo n instead of echo "No". echo n | copy /-Y *.txt df –  barlop Apr 21 '13 at 21:53

Here's a workaround. If you want to copy everything from A that does not already exist in B:

Copy A to a new directory C. Copy B to C, overwriting anything that overlaps with A. Copy C to B.

share|improve this answer
    
just...awesome!! –  ajax333221 Mar 29 '12 at 3:38
    
too complex... still +1 from me. –  Jus12 Aug 20 at 10:57

I expect xxcopy has an option for that.

Bingo:

http://www.xxcopy.com/xxcopy27.htm#tag_231

2.3   By comparison with the file in destination

    The switches in this group select files based on the
    comparison between the files in the source and those in
    the destination.  They are often used for periodic backup
    and directory synchronization purposes. These switches
    were originally created as variations of directory backup.
    They are also convenient for selecting files for deletion.

2.3.1  by Presence/Absence

    The /BB and /U switches are the two switches which select
    files by the pure presence or absence as the criteria.
    Other switches in the this group (Group 2.3) are also
    affected by the file in the destination, but for a
    particular characteristics for comparison's sake.

    /BB  Selects files that are present in source but not in destination.
    /U   Selects files that are present in both source and destination.

-Adam

share|improve this answer

I use XCOPY with the following parameters for copying .NET assemblies:

/D /Y /R /H 

/D:m-d-y - Copies files changed on or after the specified date. If no date is given, copies only those files whose source time is newer than the destination time.

/Y - Suppresses prompting to confirm you want to overwrite an existing destination file.

/R - Overwrites read-only files.

/H - Copies hidden and system files also.
share|improve this answer

this works fine

no | cp -rf c:\source c:\Dest\
share|improve this answer
3  
Perhaps I should have specified that I'm using Windows. –  JosephStyons May 4 '12 at 13:10

Depending on the size and number of files being copied, you could copy the destination directory over the source first with "yes to all", then do the original copy you were doing, also with "yes to all" set. That should give you the same results.

share|improve this answer
    
That would give the same result in the destination, but would change the source. –  Liam Oct 10 '08 at 13:24
    
True, your explanation is better anyway, I'll just go upvote it ;) –  tloach Oct 10 '08 at 13:31
    
Sweet :) I love when problems can be solved without installing more software :) –  Liam Oct 10 '08 at 13:36

echo N | copy /-y $(SolutionDir)SomeDir $(OutDir)

share|improve this answer

Try this:

robocopy "source" "destination" /e /b /copyall /xo /it

Copy that line into notepad and save as a .bat file. Run the file and it will copy everything from the source to the destination. When you run it again it will not replace files that are identical. when you change or a file changes it will replace the file at the destination.

test it out. I created a .txt file with a few works, ran the script, change the wording on the .txt file and ran the script again, it replace only the change file from the source.

/e=Copies subdirectories. Note that this option includes empty directories
/b=Copies files in Backup mode
/copyall=Copies all file information
/xo=Excludes older files. (this is what prevents it from copy the same file over and over)
/it=Includes "tweaked" files. (this will allow the copy and replace of modified files)
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.