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I would really like to deploy my project using jquery but afraid it may annoy the dail up users. So is it possible to integrate JQuery within the browser itself?

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Dial-up users are always annoyed because they're dial-up users and wait for almost everything nowadays. Dial-up users are not likely to notice your jQuery download apart from any other actions they incur on the Internet with hundreds of other websites used. Who knows, maybe the external jQuery file is already cached from a previous hit. Caching of an external .js file is the beautiful part of linking it into multiple of your pages - you certainly don't want to copy its bulk into every page because that exacerbates speed annoyance. –  John K Dec 16 '09 at 5:43
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up vote 10 down vote accepted

jQuery is a 19K download (minified and gzipped), which is a few seconds even on dialup. I wouldn't worry about it.

The only thing you should do is correctly version it so you only download it when it changes. You can do that by simply getting it from the Google AJAX Libraries API .

<script type="text/javascript" src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.3.2/jquery.min.js"></script>

What you should be aware of is the best practice for static content that is delivered from your site should:

  1. Have a far-futures Expires HTTP header to force the client to cache it;
  2. Version it somehow so when you change the version number the client will re-download it; and
  3. Gzip everything.

The jQuery from Google is already versioned with the jQuery version number. With your own content it's common to, say, use the last modified time of the file as part of the URL, eg:

<img src="/images/logo.gif?1233748877">
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cletus, 17k, really? I just looked and my jquery-1.3.2.min.js is 65k?? What gives? –  Cheeso Dec 16 '09 at 5:25
    
I just tickled the link you gave from googleapis.com, 56k for jquery.min.js. –  Cheeso Dec 16 '09 at 5:26
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The 19k (yes, 19k not 17k) claimed on the jQuery site assumes the connection will gzip the file's contents before sending it. –  Powerlord Dec 16 '09 at 5:31
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