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I would like to perform a series of correlation tests (either Pearson or Spearman will do, but will attempt both if possible) on a large dataset (40,000+ genes), which is arranged as follows in this artificial example:

Gene    S1- S2- S3- S4- S5- S1+ S2+ S3+ S4+ S5+
A       3   6   9   12  15  6   9   12  15  18
B       2   1   4   1   3   1   3   4   7   7
C       3   6   9   12  15  18  15  12  9   6

I have five paired samples that were split (- and +, for this example). I would like to see if there is any correlation between the (-) and (+) groups for each individual gene (would need both correlation coefficient and p-value). Ergo, for this example, I'd receive:

Gene    p-val   corr.
A       0       1
B       0.94    0.04
C       0       -1

I've yet to figure out any way to do this in R, but perhaps I'm missing something (only recently began learning how to use the program). If there is another freeware program that could perform these tests more efficiently, I'm open to any option (our university is cheap).

share|improve this question

closed as off-topic by Metrics, Ferdinand.kraft, joran, csgillespie, A Handcart And Mohair Feb 28 '14 at 10:50

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist" – Metrics, Ferdinand.kraft, joran, csgillespie
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

dat <- read.table(text="Gene    S1- S2- S3- S4- S5- S1+ S2+ S3+ S4+ S5+
A       3   6   9   12  15  6   9   12  15  18
B       2   1   4   1   3   1   3   4   7   7
C       3   6   9   12  15  18  15  12  9   6 ", header=TRUE)

cbind( dat[,1,drop=FALSE], 
cor.gene= apply(dat[,-1], 1, function(x) cor(x[1:5], x[6:10]) ), 
cor.test= apply(dat[,-1], 1, function(x) cor.test(x[1:5], x[6:10])$p.value ) )
  Gene    cor.gene  cor.test
1    A  1.00000000 0.0000000
2    B  0.04411765 0.9438459
3    C -1.00000000 0.0000000

@Henrik wanted only one apply , so this being a column oriented language, you need to transpose the result:

cbind( dat[,1,drop=FALSE], 
       t( apply(dat[,-1], 1, function(x) 
                               c( cor.gene=cor(x[1:5], x[6:10]), 
                                  pval= cor.test(x[1:5], x[6:10])$p.value ) )
      ) )
  Gene    cor.gene      pval
1    A  1.00000000 0.0000000
2    B  0.04411765 0.9438459
3    C -1.00000000 0.0000000
share|improve this answer
    
I think you might change $statistic to $p.value – Henrik Oct 1 '13 at 17:37
    
Done. Thanks... – 42- Oct 1 '13 at 17:39
    
I was about to post a similar solution, so I am slightly curious about the background for the -1? – Henrik Oct 1 '13 at 17:42
1  
Yeah, I was a bit surprised by that. Suspected it was probably from the OP who was expecting a more complete solution than I originally offered. (Especially since my very first effort had a syntax error.) But I suppose it could have just be a random drive-by shooting. – 42- Oct 1 '13 at 17:46
    
:) I started out with one apply with cr <- cor.test(x[1:5], x[6:10]) and data.frame(cr$p.value, cr$estimate). Initially I thought that one apply was clean, but it required some additional step afterwards to get all the pieces in place... – Henrik Oct 1 '13 at 18:29

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