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#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <cstdio>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <cmath>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>
#include <utility>
#include <queue>
#include <stack>
#include <map>
#include <set>
using namespace std;
#define PR(x) cout << #x " = " << x << "\n";


struct bomb
{
    int x,  y, state;
    bomb(){
        state = 1;
    }
};

bool cmpX(const bomb a,const bomb b){

    if(a.x == b.x){
        int t1 = a.y<0?(-a.y):a.y;
        int t2 = b.y<0?(-b.y):b.y;
        printf("%d %d\n",t1,t2 ); // to check this func
        if(t1>t2) return false;
        else return true;

    }
    int t1 = a.x<0?(-a.x):a.x;
    int t2 = b.x<0?(-b.x):b.x;
    printf("%d %d\n",t1,t2 ); // to check this func
        if(t1>t2) return false;
        else return true;

}


int main(){
    int n;

    cin>>n;
    bomb s[100000];
    for (int i = 0; i < n; ++i)
    {
        scanf("%d %d",&s[i].x, &s[i].y);
    }
    sort(s,s+n,cmpX);
}    

This code is going into an infinite loop on the following input: 24 -2 -2 -1 1 0 1 1 1 0 2 1 -1 2 -2 1 -2 -1 0 0 -2 0 -1 -2 0 -2 -1 2 -1 2 2 -1 -2 -2 1 2 0 -1 2 1 2 -1 -1 1 0 2 1 -2 2

Following is the ideone link: http://ideone.com/x1Gbah

share|improve this question
    
I suggest using std::tie or std::make_pair to get strict weak ordering. –  chris Oct 1 '13 at 18:20
    
BTW: You don't want to copy the arguments for each comparison, use const bomb& for the parameters of cmpX. –  Daniel Frey Oct 1 '13 at 18:40

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You need to define a strict weak ordering, which mean you need to return false if the elements are identical. To fix this, change

if(t1>t2)

to

if(t1>=t2)
share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't strict mean > as opposed to >=? –  Violet Giraffe Oct 1 '13 at 18:30
    
@VioletGiraffe Basically yes, > (or <) are examples of a strict weak order, >= and <= not. It also mean that if a<b and b<c, then a<c and if a<b is true, then b<a is false. And it mean that x<x is always false. –  Daniel Frey Oct 1 '13 at 18:33
    
Then your answer change > to >= contadicts your explanation, and your own phrase you need to return false if the elements are identical. The original OP's code implements correct ordering. –  Violet Giraffe Oct 1 '13 at 18:34
2  
@VioletGiraffe Why? It's the condition to return false. If they compare equal, you must return false. Note that cmpX is the strict weak order operator here! –  Daniel Frey Oct 1 '13 at 18:36
    
Oh, sorry, I thought it's return t1 >= t2. –  Violet Giraffe Oct 1 '13 at 18:40

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