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I find myself in the situation requiring this

public static void Fill(this SomeClass c, params out object[] p)

and calling it as

c.Fill(out i, out i2, out sz, out i3, out sz2);

However i get the error error CS1611: The params parameter cannot be declared as ref or out

How can i pass in variable length arguments and make them writeable? All of these are a mixture of ints and strings

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6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think I might have an answer to your question; Consider the following code snippet, with the main "InvokeMemberMethod" function doing the job you ask for. I encountered the same problem as you and came up with this solution:

Note: the "isOutXX" parameter specifies if the preceeding parameter is an "out" parameter.

static object InvokeMemberMethod(object currentObject, string methodName, int argCount, 
        ref object arg1, bool isOut1,
        ref object arg2, bool isOut2,
        ref object arg3, bool isOut3,
        ref object arg4, bool isOut4,
        ref object arg5, bool isOut5,
        ref object arg6, bool isOut6)
    {
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(methodName))
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("methodName");
        }

        if (currentObject == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("currentObject");
        }

        Type[] argTypes = null;
        object[] args = null;
        if (argCount > 0)
        {
            argTypes = new Type[argCount];
            args = new object[argCount];

            argTypes[0] = arg1.GetType();
            if (isOut1)
            {
                argTypes[0] = arg1.GetType().MakeByRefType();
            }
            args[0] = arg1;

            if (argCount == 2)
            {
                argTypes[1] = arg2.GetType();
                if (isOut2)
                {
                    argTypes[1] = arg2.GetType().MakeByRefType();
                }
                args[1] = arg2;
            }

            if (argCount == 3)
            {
                argTypes[2] = arg3.GetType();
                if (isOut3)
                {
                    argTypes[2] = arg3.GetType().MakeByRefType();
                }
                args[2] = arg3;
            }

            if (argCount == 4)
            {
                argTypes[3] = arg4.GetType();
                if (isOut4)
                {
                    argTypes[3] = arg4.GetType().MakeByRefType();
                }
                args[3] = arg4;
            }

            if (argCount == 5)
            {
                argTypes[4] = arg5.GetType();
                if (isOut5)
                {
                    argTypes[4] = arg5.GetType().MakeByRefType();
                }
                args[4] = arg5;
            }

            if (argCount == 6)
            {
                argTypes[5] = arg6.GetType();
                if (isOut6)
                {
                    argTypes[5] = arg6.GetType().MakeByRefType();
                }
                args[5] = arg6;
            }
        }

        MethodInfo methodInfo = currentObject.GetType().GetMethod(methodName, argTypes);
        int retryCount = 0;
        object ret = null;
        bool success = false;
        do
        {
            try
            {
                //if (methodInfo is MethodInfo)
                {
                    Type targetType = currentObject.GetType();
                    ParameterInfo[] info = methodInfo.GetParameters();
                    ParameterModifier[] modifier = new ParameterModifier[] { new ParameterModifier(info.Length) };
                    int i = 0;
                    foreach (ParameterInfo paramInfo in info)
                    {
                        if (paramInfo.IsOut)
                        {
                            modifier[0][i] = true;
                        }
                        i++;
                    }
                    ret = targetType.InvokeMember(methodName, BindingFlags.InvokeMethod, null, currentObject, args,
                        modifier, null, null);
                    //ret = ((MethodInfo)methodInfo).Invoke(currentObject, args,);
                    success = true;
                }
                //else
                {
                    // log error
                }
            }
            catch (TimeoutException ex)
            {

            }
            catch (TargetInvocationException ex)
            {
                throw;
            }
            retryCount++;
        } while (!success && retryCount <= 1);

        if (argCount > 0)
        {
            if (isOut1)
            {
                arg1 = args[0];
            }

            if (argCount == 2)
            {
                if (isOut2)
                {
                    arg2 = args[1];
                }
            }

            if (argCount == 3)
            {
                if (isOut3)
                {
                    arg3 = args[2];
                }
            }

            if (argCount == 4)
            {
                if (isOut4)
                {
                    arg4 = args[3];
                }
            }

            if (argCount == 5)
            {
                if (isOut5)
                {
                    arg5 = args[4];
                }
            }

            if (argCount == 6)
            {
                if (isOut6)
                {
                    arg6 = args[5];
                }
            }
        }

        return ret;

    }




    public int OutTest(int x, int y)
    {
        return x + y;
    }

    public int OutTest(int x, out int y)
    {
        y = x + 1;
        return x+2;
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        object x = 1, y = 0, z = 0;
        Program p =  new Program();
        InvokeMemberMethod(p, "OutTest", 2, 
            ref x, false, 
            ref y, true, 
            ref z, false,
            ref z, false,
            ref z, false,
            ref z, false);
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Thats pretty cool. –  acidzombie24 Jan 9 '13 at 0:13

You can't have it treat the arguments as out (or ref) and make use of the params feature at the same time. It simply doesn't work. The best you can do is to create an array parameter, make the array out, declare an array variable and call the method passing the array, then inspect each element manually by index.

Foo(out object[] data) {...}
object[] result;
Foo(out result);
// look at result[0], result[1], result[2] etc

So: you cannot do what you want. Even if you could, ref / out never work unless there is an exact match between data type, so it would still have to be:

object o1, o2, o3, o4;
Foo(out o1, out o2, out o3, out o4);
// cast o1, o2, o3, o4

Which still isn't what you want.

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Thats unfortunate. –  acidzombie24 Dec 16 '09 at 6:51

There is no technical need for out here. This works:

void Fill(object[] p)
{
    p[0] = 1;
    p[1] = 42;
    p[2] = "Hello";
    p[3] = -1;
    p[4] = "World";
}

object[] p = new object[5];
foo.Fill(p);
i = (int)p[0];
i2 = (int)p[1];
sz = (string)p[2];
i3 = (int)p[3];
sz2 = (string)p[4];


You could return your values as Tuple:
(define your own tuple class if you're not using .NET4.0)

static Tuple<int, string> Fill()
{
    return new Tuple(42, "Hello World");
}

and then define extension methods to unpack tuples:

public static class TupleExtensions
{
    public static void Unpack<T1, T2>(
        this Tuple<T1, T2> tuple,
        out T1 item1,
        out T2 item2)
    {
        item1 = tuple.Item1;
        item2 = tuple.Item2;
    }
}

Then you can write this:

int i;
string sz;

foo.Fill().Unpack(out i, out sz);
share|improve this answer
    
Thats the problem. The point was to not do this and be lazy like calling a simple function instead of horrible one line typecast or function calls per statement :( –  acidzombie24 Dec 16 '09 at 5:04
1  
close but how would i unpack a variable length turple? –  acidzombie24 Dec 16 '09 at 6:53
    
Tuples are, by definition, not of variable length. –  dtb Dec 16 '09 at 9:08

You could pass an array by ref.

Edit:

This would of course change your calling method:

object[] array = new object[] { i, i2, sz, i3, sz2 };
c.Fill(ref array);
share|improve this answer
    
put all in one basket and send this new one!! –  viky Dec 16 '09 at 4:52
1  
problem here is array will change but i1, i2 etc wont. Copying the value back to the variable defaults the purpose of the lazy method i would like. –  acidzombie24 Dec 16 '09 at 5:02
    
Have you tried it? All array types are implicitly derived from System.Array, which itself is derived from System.Object. This means that all arrays are always reference types which are allocated on the managed heap, and your app's variable contains a reference to the array and not the array itself. –  user232618 Dec 16 '09 at 5:17
3  
@Gnoome: if Fill sets array[0] to 42 then i will not receive the value. –  dtb Dec 16 '09 at 5:19

As others have said, you can't use params and out together. You have to construct an array at the call site.

This is because params tells the compiler to do the same thing - construct an array from the specified arguments. Unfortunately, when the compiler creates the array, you don't get a reference to it; even if the variable is written with a new array, you can never get to it.

I would guess you are asking for a thin metal ruler. What problem are you trying to solve with this mechanism?

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1  
I hate when people ask for a thin metal ruler. I'm parsing text via user input. I dont know how much data i can extract and which the user wants to ignore thus i am allowing the user to pass in variable length params (and a type to say ignore this entry) which should be set to the value in the class or data pass through. Thus i want to do exactly what i asked. I can return an array but in practice i have variables that already exist and its easier to do it the way i asked. –  acidzombie24 Dec 16 '09 at 18:36
    
Fair enough. Since it has been established that the syntax isn't supported, can you write a type which manages this for you? By which I mean, if you could have any syntax that doesn't involve the C# team, what would it be? –  Bryan Watts Dec 16 '09 at 21:40

1) If you can avoid the need to get the values in declared variables, then passing the array and populating it is the best option, as shown by dtb's answer.

2) Otherwise you can have a simple wrapper for your variable.

public class Wrapper //or may be generic?
{
    public object Value { get; set; }

    public Wrapper(object value)
    {
        Value = value;
    }
}

Now you can call

var i = new Wrapper(0), i2 = new Wrapper(0), i3 = new Wrapper(0);
c.Fill(i, i2, i3);
i.Value //your value here

public static void Fill(this SomeClass c, params Wrapper[] p)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < p.Length; i++)
    {
        p[i].Value = 1; //assigning
    }
}

You will have to deal with Value property after calling Fill method.

3) You can make use of closure. Something like the Ref<T> class implemented as shown:

public static class Ref
{
    public static Ref<T>[] Create<T>(params Expression<Func<T>>[] getters)
    {
        return getters.Select(Create).ToArray();
    }

    public static Ref<T> Create<T>(Expression<Func<T>> getter)
    {
        return new Ref<T>(getter);
    }
}

public sealed class Ref<T>
{
    readonly Func<T> getter;
    readonly Action<T> setter;

    public Ref(Expression<Func<T>> getter)
    {
        var output = getter.Body;
        var input = Expression.Parameter(output.Type); //or hardcode typeof(T)
        var assign = Expression.Assign(output, input);
        var setter = Expression.Lambda<Action<T>>(assign, input);

        this.getter = getter.Compile();
        this.setter = setter.Compile();
    }

    public T Value
    {
        get { return getter(); }
        set { setter(value); }
    }
}

public static void Fill(this SomeClass c, params Ref<object>[] p)
//assign inside

object i = 0, i2 = 0, i3 = 0;
c.Fill(Ref.Create(() => i, () => i2, () => i3));
//i, i2 etc changed

Few things to note:

  1. All the above approaches are basically ref approaches, compiler doesn't simply force assigning value of parameters inside the method before the control leaves as in the case of out which is your question, but as far as I know out is not possible here.

  2. I like the first one, simple, and conventional. If not possible my vote is for 3rd approach.

  3. As others have talked about, you can only pass the exact same type as ref/out parameters. So if your method by definition takes arbitrary references of object type, you have to declare even your variables as object locally. In the last approach, you can make the whole thing generic like by changing parameter type to Ref<T> from Ref<object> but that means your all local variables should also be one T.

  4. You can use a dictionary structure to cache Ref<T> to avoid recompiling same trees.

  5. The same implementation can be used to pass properties and variables as method arguments or return values by reference.

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