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I am trying to send my command line arguments through from the child process to the parent process using a pipe but can't figure out what I'm doing wrong. My code is below. Any help is appreciated. Thanks in advance.

int main(int argc, char argv[])
   pid_t child;
   int fd[2];

   pipe(fd);
   if((child = fork() == 0)
   {
      int len = strlen(argv[1]);
      close(fd[0];
      write(fd[1], argv[1], len);
      exit(0);
   }
   else //Assuming process won't fail for now
   {
      char src[10]; //Just using 10 for now, no arguments have more than 10 characters
      read(fd[0], src, (strlen(src)));
      fprintf(stderr, "%s\n", src);
      close(fd[0]);
   }
}
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1  
"no arguments have more than 10 characters" means an augment could be "1234567890" which needs char src[10+1] and src[10] = '\0' before the fprintf(stderr, "%s\n", src); –  chux Oct 1 '13 at 20:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You had a bunch of little errors but as far as I can see, believe it or not, this may be your real problem.

read(fd[0], src, (strlen(src)));

My guess is that the first char is null and you are successfully reading 0 bytes.

Change to

  read(fd[0], src, (sizeof(src)));

In your larger project make sure you read and write in loops. You are not guaranteed to read or write what you specify.

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That did it. Thanks! –  stackoverflow Oct 1 '13 at 21:20

You may need to close fd[1] inside the else block first.

check this example

#include <sys/wait.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <string.h>
    int
    main(int argc, char *argv[])
    {
            int pipefd[2];
            pid_t cpid;
            char buf;
            if (argc != 2) {
            fprintf(stderr, "Usage: %s <string>\n", argv[0]);
            exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
            }
            if (pipe(pipefd) == -1) {
                    perror("pipe");
                    exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
            }
            cpid = fork();
            if (cpid == -1) {
                    perror("fork");
                    exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
            }
            if (cpid == 0) {    /* Child reads from pipe */
                    close(pipefd[1]);          /* Close unused write end */
                    while (read(pipefd[0], &buf, 1) > 0)
                            write(STDOUT_FILENO, &buf, 1);
                    write(STDOUT_FILENO, "\n", 1);
                    close(pipefd[0]);
                    _exit(EXIT_SUCCESS);
            } else {            /* Parent writes argv[1] to pipe */
                    close(pipefd[0]);          /* Close unused read end */
                    write(pipefd[1], argv[1], strlen(argv[1]));
                    close(pipefd[1]);          /* Reader will see EOF */
                    wait(NULL);                /* Wait for child */
                    exit(EXIT_SUCCESS);
            }
    }
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Nope, I may need that in there though, but it didn't fix it. –  stackoverflow Oct 1 '13 at 19:45
1  
after write to fd[1], you need to close it too, I guess –  John Smith Oct 1 '13 at 19:47
    
I'm not sure how much of a difference it may make, but I am not allowed to use wait system calls. The part of my code provided is just part of a much bigger project I'm working on, but I just can't get the arguments to pipe correctly. Would me not using the wait system call make a difference? –  stackoverflow Oct 1 '13 at 19:55
1  
I think you need some kind of sync mechanism for communication generally. –  John Smith Oct 1 '13 at 19:59
    
Okay, thanks for the help, I'll keep trying. I'm using Minix and supposedly it can be done using only write, close, fork, and pipe calls. It had it working so it passed integers, but when I switched to Strings it fell apart. –  stackoverflow Oct 1 '13 at 20:01

You have assumed that fork() will not fail.

But what about pipe()??

Assume both get completed successfully, then closing fds properly is requered.

your if-else blocks should be like this.

if((child = fork() == 0)
   {
      int len = strlen(argv[1]);
      close(fd[0]);//I assume this was your typo. otherwise it would not even get compiled
      write(fd[1], argv[1], len);
      close(fd[1]);
      exit(0);
   }
else //Assuming process won't fail for now
   {
      close(fd[1]);
      char src[10]; //Just using 10 for now, no arguments have more than 10 characters
      read(fd[0], src, (strlen(src)));
      fprintf(stderr, "%s\n", src);
      close(fd[0]);
   }
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