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Say I have a static object:

class everything{
    public static function must(){
        return "go!";
    }
}

When I do this:

echo everything::must();

I get the response:

go!

Which is the expected behavior.


Now, for my own reasons (legacy code support) I'd like to be able to call that static object from the return of a function call, in a syntax similar to this:

print accessorFunction()::must(); // Or something as close to it as possible

function accessorFunction(){
    returns (reference to)everything; // Or something as close to it as possible
}

I hope I've made the question clear enough.

Thanks.

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1  
Make sure you know the difference between classes and objects - you seem to be using them interchangeably. It's also worth noting that PHP doesn't have the notion of a static class. –  George Brighton Oct 1 '13 at 21:02

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It's NOT possible to call static methods this way:

print accessorFunction()::must();

But possible

$class_name = accessorFunction();
print $class_name::must();

Documentation - http://www.php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.paamayim-nekudotayim.php

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1  
Beat me to it by a minute. –  LexLythius Oct 1 '13 at 21:03

I'm not sure if this is the kind of reference you're looking for, but you can always do:

print call_user_func( array( accessorFunction(), "must"));

function accessorFunction(){
    return 'everything';
}
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You could also use variable classes:

function accessorFunction() {
    return new everything();
}

$class = accessorFunction();
echo $class::must(); // go!
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1  
This solution instantiates the object, I want to keep it static if at all possible. –  Nir Gavish Oct 1 '13 at 20:57
    
Fair enough. Strictly speaking, a static method shouldn't be called on an object - it should use the class that houses the static method. –  George Brighton Oct 1 '13 at 20:59

I think the cleaner option would be to mix @nickb and @GeorgeBrighton solutions:

function accessorFunction() {
    return 'everything';
}

$class = accessorFunction();
echo $class::must(); // prints go!
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