Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

How would I add the backgroung image to my JPanel without creating a new class or method, but simply by inserting it along with the rest of the JPanel's attributes?

I am trying to set a JPanel's background using an image, however, every example I find seems to suggest extending the panel with its own class.

I have been looking for a way to simply add the image without creating a whole new class and within the same method (trying to keep things organized and simple).

Here is an example of the method that sets my JPanel:

public static JPanel drawGamePanel(){
    //Create game panel and attributes
    JPanel gamePanel = new JPanel();
    Image background = Toolkit.getDefaultToolkit().createImage("Background.png");
    gamePanel.drawImage(background, 0, 0, null);
    //Set Return
    return gamePanel;
}
share|improve this question
    
so what is the problem to create custom JPanel? – Maxim Shoustin Oct 1 '13 at 20:55
    
How would I add the backgroung image to my JPanel without creating a new class or method, but simply by inserting it along with the rest of the JPanel's attributes? – Joshua Martin Oct 1 '13 at 20:56
    
As I know you can only change color or create like in examples you saw extends JPanel :) – Maxim Shoustin Oct 1 '13 at 20:57

I am trying to set a JPanel's background using an image, however, every example I find seems to suggest extending the panel with its own class

yes you will have to extend JPanel and override the paintcomponent(Graphics g) function to do so.

@Override
  protected void paintComponent(Graphics g) {

    super.paintComponent(g);
        g.drawImage(bgImage, 0, 0, null);
}

I have been looking for a way to simply add the image without creating a whole new class and within the same method (trying to keep things organized and simple).

You can use other component which allows to add image as icon directly e.g. JLabel if you want.

ImageIcon icon = new ImageIcon(imgURL); 
JLabel thumb = new JLabel();
thumb.setIcon(icon);

But again in the bracket trying to keep things organized and simple !! what makes you to think that just creating a new class will lead you to a messy world ?

share|improve this answer

Simplest way to set image as JPanel background

Don't use a JPanel. Just use a JLabel with an Icon then you don't need custom code.

See Background Panel for more information as well as a solution that will paint the image on a JPanel with 3 different painting options:

  1. scaled
  2. tiled
  3. actual
share|improve this answer

As I know the way you can do it is to override paintComponent method that demands to inherit JPanel

 @Override
protected void paintComponent(Graphics g) {
    super.paintComponent(g); // paint the background image and scale it to fill the entire space
    g.drawImage(/*....*/);
}

The other way (a bit complicated) to create second custom JPanel and put is as background for your main

ImagePanel

public class ImagePanel extends JPanel
{
private static final long serialVersionUID = 1L;
private Image image = null;
private int iWidth2;
private int iHeight2;

public ImagePanel(Image image)
{
    this.image = image;
    this.iWidth2 = image.getWidth(this)/2;
    this.iHeight2 = image.getHeight(this)/2;
}


public void paintComponent(Graphics g)
{
    super.paintComponent(g);
    if (image != null)
    {
        int x = this.getParent().getWidth()/2 - iWidth2;
        int y = this.getParent().getHeight()/2 - iHeight2;
        g.drawImage(image,x,y,this);
    }
}
}

EmptyPanel

public class EmptyPanel extends JPanel{

private static final long serialVersionUID = 1L;

public EmptyPanel() {
    super();
    init();
}

@Override
public boolean isOptimizedDrawingEnabled() {
    return false;
}


public void init(){

    LayoutManager overlay = new OverlayLayout(this);
    this.setLayout(overlay);

    ImagePanel iPanel = new ImagePanel(new IconToImage(IconFactory.BG_CENTER).getImage());
    iPanel.setLayout(new BorderLayout());   
    this.add(iPanel);
    iPanel.setOpaque(false);                
}
}

IconToImage

public class IconToImage {

Icon icon;
Image image;


public IconToImage(Icon icon) {
    this.icon = icon;
    image = iconToImage();
}

public Image iconToImage() { 
    if (icon instanceof ImageIcon) { 
        return ((ImageIcon)icon).getImage(); 
    } else { 
        int w = icon.getIconWidth(); 
        int h = icon.getIconHeight(); 
        GraphicsEnvironment ge = GraphicsEnvironment.getLocalGraphicsEnvironment(); 
        GraphicsDevice gd = ge.getDefaultScreenDevice(); 
        GraphicsConfiguration gc = gd.getDefaultConfiguration(); 
        BufferedImage image = gc.createCompatibleImage(w, h); 
        Graphics2D g = image.createGraphics(); 
        icon.paintIcon(null, g, 0, 0); 
        g.dispose(); 
        return image; 
    } 
}


/**
 * @return the image
 */
public Image getImage() {
    return image;
}
}
share|improve this answer
    
Shouldn't the code comment be on the next line? "The other way (a bit complicated) to create second custom JPanel and put is as background for your main" How does the '2nd panel' actually progress toward a solution? It seems it comes back to the same basic problem (just in a different panel). – Andrew Thompson Oct 1 '13 at 21:02
    
@AndrewThompson if his main class extends some other class, he can't inherit fromJPanel, therefore he can add new custom JPanel – Maxim Shoustin Oct 1 '13 at 21:09

Draw the image on the background of a JPanel that is added to the frame. Use a layout manager to normally add your buttons and other components to the panel. If you add other child panels, perhaps you want to set child.setOpaque(false).

import javax.imageio.ImageIO;
import javax.swing.*;
import java.awt.*;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.net.URL;

public class BackgroundImageApp {
    private JFrame frame;

    private BackgroundImageApp create() {
        frame = createFrame();
        frame.getContentPane().add(createContent());

        return this;
    }

    private JFrame createFrame() {
        JFrame frame = new JFrame(getClass().getName());
        frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(WindowConstants.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);

        return frame;
    }

    private void show() {
        frame.pack();
        frame.setLocationRelativeTo(null);
        frame.setVisible(true);
    }

    private Component createContent() {
        final Image image = requestImage();

        JPanel panel = new JPanel() {
            @Override
            protected void paintComponent(Graphics g) {
                super.paintComponent(g);
                g.drawImage(image, 0, 0, null);
            }
        };

        panel.setLayout(new BoxLayout(panel, BoxLayout.Y_AXIS));
        for (String label : new String[]{"One", "Dois", "Drei", "Quatro", "Peace"}) {
            JButton button = new JButton(label);
            button.setAlignmentX(Component.CENTER_ALIGNMENT);
            panel.add(Box.createRigidArea(new Dimension(15, 15)));
            panel.add(button);
        }

        panel.setPreferredSize(new Dimension(500, 500));

        return panel;
    }

    private Image requestImage() {
        Image image = null;

        try {
            image = ImageIO.read(new URL("http://www.johnlennon.com/wp-content/themes/jl/images/home-gallery/2.jpg"));
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }

        return image;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                new BackgroundImageApp().create().show();
            }
        });
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.