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For each of the following code snippets, I need to state the growth function as well as the order. I'm fairly certain I have the orders determined correctly but I'm struggling to see how an entire function with constants and all can be derived from what I'm provided with.

Here are the pieces of code:

// CODE #1
for (int count=0; count<n; count++)
{
    for (int count2=0; count2<n; count2=count2+2)
    {
        System.out.println(count + ", " + count2);
     }
}

// CODE #2
for (int count=0; count<n; count++)
{
    for (int count2=1; count2<n; count2=count2*2)
     {
         System.out.println(count + ", " + count2);
    }     
}

// CODE #3
for (int count = 0; count < n; count++) {
    printsum(count); }

// Here’s the method:

public void printsum(int count) {
    int sum = 0;
    for (int i=1; i<count; i++) {
        sum += i; 
    }
    System.out.println(sum + ": " + sum); 
    }

// CODE #4
for (int count = 0; count < n; count++) 
{
    printsum(count); 
}

// Here’s the method:

public void printsum(int count) { 
    int sum = 0;
    sum = count * (count + 1)/2; 
    System.out.println(“sum : " + sum);
}

I think the orders are O(n^2), O(nlogn (base 2)), O(n^2), and O(n^3). If anyone could offer any suggestions on finding the growth functions or correcting my work so far, please let me know.

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Your fourth big-O is wrong. As for actually finding the growth function, it'll probably help to break it down and test out small cases. –  Dennis Meng Oct 1 '13 at 23:19
    
Welcome to SO. Unfortunately this site is not a "please check my homework site". Please read the FAQ and How to Ask for hints on writing good questions. –  Jim Garrison Oct 1 '13 at 23:23
    
@JimGarrison Sorry about that. I didn't mean for this to come across that way. Rather, as a general explanation for how to derive growth functions from code. –  user2836767 Oct 1 '13 at 23:28

1 Answer 1

Building a growth rate function is simply finding how many times each particular piece of code is evaluated in relation to (n). You will need to incorporate how many times variables are assigned or initialized as well as how many times the loops will check to see if they are done running.

I can help with Code #1 and will leave the rest for you.

We will begin by evaluating the outer for loop. How many times in the variable count going to be assigned? This piece of the logic will only ever execute once so the answer here is 1. How many times will the loop perform the evaluation count (less than) n? This portion of the code will be evaluated a total of n+1 times, n times that the loop will actually run and one extra time that is the evaluation that stops the loops processing. Finally in the outer for loop, how many times will the count variable be incremented (count++)? This will happen a total of n times.

What do we have so far?

Our outer for loop has given us a function so far of:

GRF = 1 + n+1 + n

Now to begin on our inner for loop. How many times will the entire inner for loop be executed? The inner for loop will be executed a total of n times. This means that we will need to multiply all of the inner for loops processes by n. Our GRF will end up looking something like this:

GRF = 1 + n+1 + n + n(processes of the inner for loop)

Ignoring the multiplication of n for the time being we will continue to evaluate the inner for loop as we did the outer for loop from above. How many times will the initialization of the variable count2 happen? This will happen once. How many times will the code count2 (less than) n be evaluated? This portion is a little tricky because you will need to look at the increment rate of the count2 variable. It is incrementing by a value of 2 during every execution of the loop. This means that the variable will grow twice as fast and the loop will only be evaluated half as many times as it would have been if that variable was only incrementing by one. so we have (n+1)/2. Remember the +1 accounts for the evaluation that causes the loop to fail and here the loop will only be evaluated half as many times. Now, for the last portion of the inner loop declaration. How many times will the count2 variable be incremented? This will happen n/2 times. How many times will the System.out.println() exicute within the inner for loop? This will happen the same number of times as the incrementing of the count2 variable, so it will happen n/2 times.

Now we need to plug all of these evaluations into that inner for loop portion of our GRF above. We end up with something like this:

GRF = 1 + n+1 + n + n( 1 + (n+1)/2 + n/2 + n/2)

Let's do a little algebra

1 + n+1 + n + n( 1 + n/2 + 1/2 + n/2 + n/2)
1 + n+1 + n + n + (n^2)/2 + n/2 + (n^2)/2 + (n^2)/2
3(n^2/2) + 7n/2 + 2

There we go. A growth rate function. To get the O( ) we simply keep the largest term and knock off all of the constants and factors so we end up with a O( n^2 ).

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