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I am trying to byte-align a function to 16-byte boundary using the 'aligned(16)' attribute. I did the following: void __attribute__((aligned(16))) function() { }

(Source: http://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc/Function-Attributes.html)

But when I compile (gcc foo.c ; no makefiles or linker scripts used), I get the following error:

FOO.c:99: error: alignment may not be specified for 'function'

I tried aligning to 4,8,32, etc as well but the error remains the same. I need this to align an Interrupt Service Routine for a powerpc-based processor. What is the correct way of doing so ?

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Why do you want to do this? –  Lars Wirzenius Dec 16 '09 at 7:26
10  
The OP has explained exactly why they need to do this, in the second-last sentence. –  caf Dec 16 '09 at 7:32
3  
Another delightfully evil use for aligning functions is storing additional data in the low bits of function-pointer variables... –  R.. Dec 20 '10 at 4:25
    
@R.., evil. Just as storing in the high byte of 32 bit addresses on the 680EC30 or 68000 processors. Very evil indeed. –  Prof. Falken Dec 4 '11 at 23:16

3 Answers 3

Why don't you just pass the -falign-functions=16 to gcc when compiling?

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2  
That's too easy, isn't it? –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 16 '09 at 7:19
3  
Yes I can do that, but that would align all functions to 16byte, whereas I need only the ISR to get 16 byte aligned. But, if there is no other option I will have to do the same. –  Sukanto Dec 17 '09 at 12:03
    
If you're not using GCC >=4.3, this is the way to go. –  Gonzalo Dec 17 '09 at 19:18
1  
@Sukanto, do it and then place the function in a separate C file. –  Prof. Falken Dec 4 '11 at 23:19

You are probably using an older version of gcc that does not support that attribute. The documentation link you provided is for the "current development" of gcc. Looking through the various releases, the attribute only appears in the documentation for gcc 4.3 and beyond.

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I guess that is possible. My compiler is gcc 4.0.0. –  Sukanto Dec 17 '09 at 12:09

Adapting from my answer on this GCC question, you might try using #pragma directives, like so:

    #pragma GCC push_options
    #pragma GCC optimize ("align-functions=16")

    //add 5 to each element of the int array.
    void add5(int a[20]) {
        int i = 19;
        for(; i > 0; i--) {
            a[i] += 5;
        }
    }

    #pragma GCC pop_options

The #pragma push_options and pop_options macros are used to control the scope of the optimize pragma's effect. More details about these macros can be found in the GCC docs.


Alternately, if you prefer GCC's attribute syntax, you should be able to do something like:

    //add 5 to each element of the int array.
    __attribute__((optimize("align-functions=16")))
    void add5(int a[20]) {
        int i = 19;
        for(; i > 0; i--) {
            a[i] += 5;
        }
    }
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