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I'm trying to print 01-99 in words and I am somewhat successful.

Here is the source code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    char a, b;
    char *digit1;
    char *digit2;

    // get digit character by character
    scanf("%c%c", &a, &b);

    switch(a) {
        case '1':
            switch(b) {
                case '0':
                    digit1 = "ten";
                    break;

                case '1':
                    digit1 = "eleven";
                    break;

                case '2':
                    digit1 = "twelve";
                    break;

                case '3':
                    digit1 = "thirteen";
                    break;

                case '4':
                    digit1 = "fourteen";
                    break;

                case '5':
                    digit1 = "fifteen";
                    break;

                case '6':
                    digit1 = "sixteen";
                    break;

                case '7':
                    digit1 = "seventeen";
                    break;

                case '8':
                    digit1 = "eighteen";
                    break;

                case '9':
                    digit1 = "nineteen";
                    break;

                default:
                    digit1 = "";
                    break;
            }
            break;

        case '2':
            digit1 = "twenty-";
            break;

        case '3':
            digit1 = "thirty-";
            break;

        case '4':
            digit1 = "forty-";
            break;

        case '5':
            digit1 = "fifty-";
            break;

        case '6':
            digit1 = "sixty-";
            break;

        case '7':
            digit1 = "seventy-";
            break;

        case '8':
            digit1 = "eighty-";
            break;

        case '9':
            digit1 = "ninty-";
            break;

        default:
            digit1 = "";
    }

    switch(b) {
        case '1':
            digit2 = "one";
            break;

        case '2':
            digit2 = "two";
            break;

        case '3':
            digit2 = "three";
            break;

        case '4':
            digit2 = "four";
            break;

        case '5':
            digit2 = "five";
            break;

        case '6':
            digit2 = "six";
            break;

        case '7':
            digit2 = "seven";
            break;

        case '8':
            digit2 = "eight";
            break;

        case '9':
            digit2 = "nine";
            break;

        case '0':
            digit2 = "\b";
            break;

        default:
            digit2 = strcpy(digit1, "\b");
    }

    if (a != 1) {
        printf("%s%s\n", digit1, digit2);
    }
    else {
        printf("%s\n", digit1);
    }

    return 0;
}

I'm successful in printing from 20-99 until now. But there is an error. If I enter any of 20, 30, 40... - is not removed as it should be cause I used \b to remove that.

share|improve this question
3  
\b doesn't really mean what you think it means. You need to not print the - out unless you need it, instead of trying to erase it after already printing it out. –  jxh Oct 2 '13 at 1:36
    
@jxh \b == BACKSPACE == "clear one character left". Am I wrong? –  Santosh Kumar Oct 2 '13 at 1:38
2  
Where does the C standard say it has to "clear one character left"? Anyway, if you send the output to a file instead of the screen, the \b would actually show up in the file itself. Any attempt you are making to fix your output with control sequences only affects its appearance on the screen, which is not the same as emitting correct output. –  jxh Oct 2 '13 at 1:39
4  
\b means to backspace a character. Technically it doesn't clear the character unless you overwrite it with something else. If you're running Linux, try this at the prompt and see what you get: echo -e "abc\b\b1". If \b` were "erase" then you'd get a1. But instead you get a1c. It just moves the cursor back. –  lurker Oct 2 '13 at 1:47
    
do \b <space> </b> –  Ishmeet Oct 2 '13 at 1:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is a little outside of the C standard as it concerns the behavior of the input/output environment, but usually the backspace character just repositions the cursor. To back up and erase, try the sequence BACKSPACE SPACE BACKSPACE.

This is the behavior of the DEC VT100 terminal, which is pretty ubiquitous (also called ANSI terminal, same is used by XTERM-derived terminals). As @jxh points out, adding terminal-specific sequences is only appropriate if the output device is a terminal. If you're writing to a file, this will not erase, but simply add these additional bytes to the output stream. However, these delayed sequences would still be interpreted correctly if written to the terminal at a later time, perhaps using cat. You could use the POSIX function isatty(3) to get a good guess at whether these sequences will be interpreted.

It may be possible to unwrite a character in a buffered write by adjusting the file position.

FILE *myfile = /*initialization*/;
/* ... */
fsetpos (myfile, -1, SEEK_CUR);

Please also consider MvG's valuable comments for more ways these methods may fail. (It really is shaky territory, being outside of the standard. brrrrr. :)

share|improve this answer
2  
That would still leave invalid output if redirected to a file. –  jxh Oct 2 '13 at 1:41
    
@jxh Good point. –  luser droog Oct 2 '13 at 1:41
    
And if output were an old style printer, then the dash would be on paper, and no amount of moving the typing head back will make it vanish again. Some modern printers are designed to mimic the old ones. So some systems might represent this as a strike-through letter space. I don't argue, this is among the best that can be hoped for, but still not perfect. The fsetpos would fail if output happens to be an unbuffered tty. It will also leave the - in case no more data gets written. –  MvG Oct 2 '13 at 1:50

You could replace

digit2 = "\b";

by

if (digit1[0] != '\0')
    digit1[strlen(digit1) - 1] = '\0';

which effectively removes the trailing character from digit1.

Since this works completely on the level of your strings, you avoid relying on device-specific behaviour as \b would do.

share|improve this answer
2  
Daggnabbit! Even your geometric gravatar is better than mine! Phooey. +1 for fixing the problem not the symptoms. :) –  luser droog Oct 2 '13 at 1:58

The escape code "\b" emits a terminal-control character; that is, it writes an additional control character to the output stream, it does not remove previous characters from the output stream: On most systems "hellO\bo" produces a string literal of 8 bytes equivalent to { 'h', 'e', 'l', 'l', 'O', '\b', 'o', '\0' };

It is important, though, to remember that this is a terminal-control character. What it does is terminal dependent: some terminals move the cursor left stopping at column 0, some move the cursor left with wrap, some erase the character the cursor arrives at, others don't.

But further more, if you are viewing the data other than through a terminal, it is just a byte. E.g. the code

#include <stdio.h>
int main(int argc, char* argv[]) {
    printf("Hello!\b\n");
}

will generate a sequence of ascii values that, if viewed with linux "cat" might display "Hello", with Windows/DOS "more" command, "Hello!" (DOS is a non-destructive backspace) and if loaded in notepad produce "Hello!" followed by what looks like a wing-ding.

Don't confuse terminal control with io-stream control.

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