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This has got to be a solved problem, I just can't seem to find an answer...

I have a WPF front-end in a class library that uses Ninject IoC container; each View uses a ViewModel that gets a Model constructor-injected, and the Model receives a class derived from DbContext, also in its constructor.

As I type these words it occurs to me that I could solve this problem by injecting a factory that creates a class derived from DbContext, but I'll just finish putting the problem in context here.

This setup makes each window own a unit of work - which is exactly what I want. The problem is that on one of these windows I want a discard changes command that reloads all entities from the context.

I read the only reliable way to do this is to Dispose the context and reinstantiate it.

  • Q1: How is this supposed to play well with Dependency Injection?

I might have something like this:

public class SomeModel : ISomeModel
{
    private readonly SomeContext _context;
    public SomeModel(SomeContext context)
    {
        _context = context;
    }

    /* some methods acting upon entities in _context */
}

What I'm thinking of is something like this:

public class SomeModel : ISomeModel
{
    private readonly IContextFactory<SomeContext> _factory;
    private SomeContext _context;
    public SomeModel(IContextFactory<SomeContext> factory)
    {
        _factory = factory;
        _context = _factory.Create();
    }

    public void DiscardChanges()
    {
        _context.Dispose();
        _context = _factory.Create();
    }

    /* some methods acting upon entities in _context */
}
  • Q2: Are there any known issues/pitfalls to this approach?

Right now I'm binding DbContext like this, using Ninject's Conventions extension:

_kernel.Bind(t => t.From(_dataLayerAssembly)
                   .SelectAllClasses()
                   .Where(type => type.Name.EndsWith("Context"))
                   .BindDefaultInterface()
                   .Configure(config => config.InCallScope()));

If I go with the above approach, I don't need this configuration anymore (besides I'm not 100% sure the context gets disposed when I think it does) and I gain full control over the context's timeline and disposal... but I feel like I'm breaking something in the pattern - not that I care much about breaking a pattern (not a "purist"), though I'm curious to see how a MVVM+DI "purist" would approach this.

Also I know Ninject has a Factory extension which could probably eliminate the need for factory classes, but last time I used it, it broke - the class library must be usable by a VB6 ActiveX DLL, and the factory extension doesn't seem to like that.

share|improve this question
    
I have posted the factory solution here on CodeReview, as I'd like to get some feedback on my code. –  Mat's Mug Oct 2 '13 at 22:40
    
retailcoder: Why is there a requirement for a TContext to inherit DbContext? All you need is the IDisposable interface. I would go for: where TContext : IDisposable. –  Frederik Prijck Jul 16 '14 at 7:47

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