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The parent class is...

public class UMember {
    private String first;
    private String last;
    private String street;
    private String city;
    private String state;
    private String zipcode;

    public UMember() {
        this("na", "na", "na", "na", "na", "na");
    }

    public UMember(String first, String last, String street, 
            String city, String state, String zipcode){
        set(first, last, street, city, state, zipcode);
    }

    private void set(String first, String last, String street, 
            String city, String state, String zipcode){
        this.first = first;
        this.last = last;
        this.street = street;
        this.city = city;
        this.state = state;
        this.zipcode = zipcode;
    }

    public void setUMember(String first, String last, String street,
            String city, String state, String zipcode) {
       set(first, last, street, city, state, zipcode);
    }

The parent subclass of UMember is...

public class Employee extends UMember {
    private int eid;
    private String doh;
    private String dept;
    private double salary;

    public Employee() {
        this(0, "na", "na", 0.0, "na", "na", "na", "na", "na", "na");
    }

    public Employee(int eid, String doh, String dept, double salary) {
        this(eid, doh, dept, salary, "na", "na", "na", "na", "na", "na");
    }



    public Employee(int eid, String doh, String dept, double salary, 
            String first, String last, String street, String city, 
            String state, String zipcode) {
        super(first, last, street, city, state, zipcode);
        set(eid, doh, dept, salary);
    }

    private void set(int eid, String doh, String dept, double salary) {
        this.setEid(eid);
        this.setDoh(doh);
        this.setDept(dept);
        this.setSalary(salary);
    }

    private void setEmployee(int eid, String doh, String dept, double salary, 
            String first, String last, String street, String city, 
            String state, String zipcode) {
        setUMember(first, last, street, city, state, zipcode);
        set(eid, doh, dept, salary);
    }

The subclass of Employee is...

public class Faculty extends Employee{
    private String rank;
    private int annualTeachingLoad;

    public Faculty() {
        this("na", 0, 0, "na", "na", 0.0, 
                "na", "na", "na", "na", "na", "na");
    }

    public Faculty(String rank, int annualTeachingLoad) {
        this(rank, annualTeachingLoad, 0, "na", "na", 0.0, 
                "na", "na", "na", "na", "na", "na");
    }

Neither of the default constructors above in the Faculty sub-class are correct. I cannot figure out why. I am first using default values for Faculty, then Employee, finally UMember. Any help on why both of these pieces of code are incorrect would be much appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
super(...) has to be the first thing called. –  Sotirios Delimanolis Oct 2 '13 at 2:51
    
@SotiriosDelimanolis - Where do you see OP violating this rule? –  PM 77-1 Oct 2 '13 at 2:59
    
What do you mean by 'the code is incorrect?' –  Kevin Panko Oct 2 '13 at 3:07

1 Answer 1

You are calling a constructor with this instead of super. Calling a constructor with this will only be able to call constructors that are declared in the same class, whereas super is for calling constructors in the superclass.

share|improve this answer
    
So the code in my Employee class that calls the default constructor with all of the default values for Employee and UMember. That is what I am trying to write once again but in the Faculty class. –  Tyler Huddleston Oct 2 '13 at 3:01
    
If you want to call a constructor that is declared in the superclass instead of this, you need to call it with super, not with this. –  tbodt Oct 2 '13 at 19:10

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