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I'm attempting to chain multiple setter methods together. I'd like to know if anyone knows of a clean way to parse through multiple errors, preferably using a try-catch block and handling using the default Exception class.

As the code stands now, all I receive is the first Exception object (from foo) that is caught, so I can only display one error to the user.

Any pointers or conventions would be appreciated!

class Test {
   function setName($name) {
      if (empty($name))
         throw new Exception("Name is empty.");

      return $this;
   }

   function setDescription($description) {
      if (empty($description))
         throw new Exception("Description.");

      return $this;
}


try {

   $object->setName("foo")
          ->setDescription("bar");

} catch(Exception $e) {

}
share|improve this question
    
1. When exception is thrown no statement below in try/catch is executed, which means that exception will be thrown just once. 2. You don't throw general exception, but specific one, so you have control what to catch/handle. The best suitable exception here is InvalidArgumentException. – Leri Oct 2 '13 at 7:18
1  
You shouldn't really be treating input validation error as an exception.... after all, it's user input so we should expect it to be wrong. Exceptions are intended for the exceptional, such as "database has crashed" – Mark Baker Oct 2 '13 at 7:24

You can catch different Exceptions but only 1 at a time. Exceptions are not just warnings or notices, an exception means that a function could not get the expected results and the program can't simply go on. It is not ment to be used to tell the user he didn't fill in a specific field.

Use other techniques for that.

share|improve this answer

You can not throw more than one exception by it's definition (similar to why you can not return result from function more than once).

In your case - you can store some structure with results, to which you will write errors of operations in your class. Then, if it's not empty, throw an exception with gathered content.

share|improve this answer
    
Honestly, I don't think validation should be throwing exceptions. Validating user input it's perfectly expected to happen some error (that's why you validate). So boolean check if input was valid or not is more acceptable, imho. – Leri Oct 2 '13 at 7:24
    
And I did not though about validation, actually. It's just a way for OP to gather his messages. It's not the only way, of cause, but possible – Alma Do Oct 2 '13 at 7:26

When an Exception is thrown, the code stop and the Exception will bubble until a catch instruction will handle it.

So when you do:

   $object->setName("foo")
          ->setDescription("bar");

If the call of setName throws an exception, you second setter won't be called.

You need to handle errors by yourself in your case:

class Test {
   private $errors = array();

   function setName($name) {
      if (empty($name))
         $this->errors[] = "Name is empty.";

      return $this;
   }

   function setDescription($description) {
      if (empty($description))
         $this->errors[] = "Description.";

      return $this;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. This is the method I was considering using. – Jared Roussel Oct 2 '13 at 7:24

You might want to look into error handling and exceptions: Exceptions are for exceptional situations, these look like situations that you can come across a lot: If there is an unexpected situation, you throw an exception and stop whatever you are doing. As the state is unknown, you cannot continue doing more work because you are in this exceptional situation.

If you want to direct flow in the case of an error, you should write some sort of error-handler not based on exceptions so you continue work, but report the error back to the user.

There is a lot to read about this, you want to look for resources on using "exceptions as flow control", and why it is a bad idea.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. I do regularly use Exception in simple cases throughout, but I understand now that it is not for error handling. – Jared Roussel Oct 2 '13 at 7:27

The point of an Exception is that something has happened from which you can not recover. Thus it halts the execution and bubbles up until it's at the top (Error: Uncaught Exception) or until it is caught and handled by a try/catch.

If you absolutely want multiple errors, you could keep track of that state inside of your class:

abstract class Statefull // abstract because it makes no sense instantiating this
{
    protected $isValid = true;
    protected $errors = array();

    protected function invalidate($field, $error) {
        $this->isValid = false;
        $this->errors[$field] = $error;
    }

    public function isValid() { return $this->isValid; }

    public function getErrors() { return $this->errors; }
}

This example class allows for one error per field and can be extended as follows.

class Test extends Statefull
{
    protected $name;
    protected $description;

    function setName($name) {
        if (empty($name)) this->invalidate('name', 'Name is empty');
        else $this->name = $name;

        return $this;
    }

    function setDescription($description) {
        if (empty($description)) this->invalidate('description', 'Description is empty');
        else $this->description = $description;

        return $this;
    }
}

And can be used like this:

$test = new Test();
$test->setName('')->setDescription('');
if (!$test->isValid()) {
    var_dump($test->getErrors());
    die();
}

If you have PHP 5.4, you could also solve this problem with traits:

trait Statefull
{
    protected $isValid = true;
    protected $errors = array();

    protected function invalidate($field, $error) {
        $this->isValid = false;
        $this->errors[$field] = $error;
    }

    public function isValid() { return $this->isValid; }

    public function getErrors() { return $this->errors; }
}

The implementation will then be like this, with the advantage of not needing to extend a class (if you are allready extending your models from a different base class):

class Test
{
    use Statefull;
    protected $name;
    protected $description;

    function setName($name) {
        if (empty($name)) this->invalidate('name', 'Name is empty');
        else $this->name = $name;

        return $this;
    }

    function setDescription($description) {
        if (empty($description)) this->invalidate('description', 'Description is empty');
        else $this->description = $description;

        return $this;
    }
}

The usage is the same as before. If you do this, be aware of the restrictions properties in traits bring:

If a trait defines a property then a class can not define a property with the same name, otherwise an error is issued. It is an E_STRICT if the class definition is compatible (same visibility and initial value) or fatal error otherwise.

share|improve this answer
    
This is a nice error handling solution to consider. Thank you for your input on this! – Jared Roussel Oct 2 '13 at 7:31
    
to be complete, I've also added a solution which uses traits to solve this. – NDM Oct 2 '13 at 7:40

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