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As we know, in quicksort you can use Lomuto-Partition. I checked a lot of references and almost all of them come up with the following implementation:

int L_partition(int *a, int l, int r)
{
    int i, j, p, t;

    p = a[r];
    i = l - 1;

    for(j =l; j <= r-1; j++) {
        if(a[j] <= p) {
            i++;

            t = a[j];
            a[j] = a[i];
            a[i] = t;
        }
    }

    t = a[i+1];
    a[i+1] = a[r];
    a[r] = t;

    return i+1;
}

My question is why the i starts with l-1 and have all the i+1 stuff ? I think just start with l is fine. I test the below program. And it gives the same result as the above one. This is much more straightforward than the above one.

int L_partition2(int *a, int l, int r)
{
    int i, j, p, t;

    p = a[r];
    i = l;

    for(j = l; j <= r-1; j++) {
        if(a[j] <= p) {
            t = a[j];
            a[j] = a[i];
            a[i] = t;

            i++;
        }
    }

    t = a[i];
    a[i] = a[r];
    a[r] = t;

    return i;

}
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Your version is better. It is equivalent, but makes more sense and is easier to read. I'm not sure why the books have it the other way. –  mrip Oct 2 '13 at 10:30
    
Since this is very basic and classic algorithm, I am wondering if I missed any point. Almost all websites and slides from the CS course of colleges are using the first approach. –  deepsky Oct 2 '13 at 12:24
    
That's odd. Doesn't matter much, it's the same algorithm, but IMO yours is better code. Maybe the (i-1) (i+1) stuff appeared in some old text, and everyone else just copied it. –  mrip Oct 2 '13 at 13:06

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It is exactly the same you are just shifting the usage of i.

Note that you are incrementing i after the swap, because yours is valid from the beginning and the original version increments it before the swap. But the important thing is that the swap uses always the same element (in your version and the original).

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