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According to book Java Concurrency in Practice at Listing 12.3 we could test a concurrent code using the following sample code:

void testTakeBlocksWhenEmpty() {
 final BoundedBuffer<Integer> bb = new BoundedBuffer<Integer>(10);
 Thread taker = new Thread() {
  public void run() {
   try {
    int unused = bb.take();
    fail(); // if we get here, it’s an error
   } catch (InterruptedException success) { }
  }
 };
 try {
  taker.start();
  Thread.sleep(LOCKUP_DETECT_TIMEOUT);
  taker.interrupt();
  taker.join(LOCKUP_DETECT_TIMEOUT);
  assertFalse(taker.isAlive());
 } catch (Exception unexpected) {
  fail();
 }
}

Let's say that the following steps are executed:

  1. taker thread started.
  2. bb.take() returned successfully and we are just a little bit before the fail() method run.
  3. It is called the interrupt() method.
  4. We are at the catch block of the taker thread.

So, we are at the catch block at the moment but actually the test method failed. It is failed and we are never informed.

Is this right? If yes how could we fix this?

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Never saw BoundedBuffer data structure before in Java. What does take() function do? Please provide some references. –  Aniket Thakur Oct 2 '13 at 7:29
    
The Thread.sleep will make chances close to certainty that if takedoes not block, the fail method will be called before the thread is interrupted. And anyway: interruption is just setting a flag. You'll have to block in order for the exception to be thrown. –  Fildor Oct 2 '13 at 7:38
    
@Fildor:Let's say that LOCKUP_DETECT_TIMEOUT time is not enough. Should I increase this time? Is this a right edit or should I change something at the code? –  LiTTle Oct 2 '13 at 7:49
    
@Aniket Thakur: The BoundedBuffer does not exist in Java. It as a custom class using Semaphore to create a blocking operation. It reminds me the BlockingQueue. The only reference I can provide is "Chapter 12. Testing Concurrent Programs - Listing 12.3" –  LiTTle Oct 2 '13 at 7:52
    
Did you actually run into this problem or is this more like an academical question? If take() does not block and its runtime is smaller than the sleeptime , let's say sleeptime is at least double the peek take()-on-no-block-time then you are safe enough. By the way, when the thread on which take is executed has passed take() and then the interrupt is called, what will happen? Nothing. The exception will not be thrown, except the thread will enter a method in fail() that will throw one. –  Fildor Oct 2 '13 at 7:54

1 Answer 1

take is supposed to block on an empty queue. So the expected sequence of events is:

  • taker.start(); => start the thread
  • Thread.sleep(LOCKUP_DETECT_TIMEOUT); wait to make sure the thread is started and take has been called. The actual value of the constant is hard to estimate, but anything above a few hundreds of millis should be enough - alternatively you could use a CountDownLatch to know when the taker thread is started
  • in taker thread: bb.take(); => is supposed to block - if it doesn't fail() is called and the test fails
  • in main thread: taker.interrupt(); => the take() method is supposed to exit with InterruptedException
  • in main thread: taker.join(); => wait for some time to allow the taker thread to finish
  • in main thread: assertFalse(taker.isAlive()); => confirm that the taker thread has exited and is not blocked in the take method any more

Version with a latch (it assumes that if the thread is interrupted before take is called, take will exit with an InterruptedException - if not then you have no other way but to add some random sleep before calling started.await()):

void testTakeBlocksWhenEmpty() {
 final CountDownLatch started = new CountDownLatch(1);
 final CountDownLatch ended = new CountDownLatch(1);
 final BoundedBuffer<Integer> bb = new BoundedBuffer<Integer>(10);
 Thread taker = new Thread() {
  public void run() {
   try {
    started.countDown();
    int unused = bb.take();
    fail(); // if we get here, it’s an error
   } catch (InterruptedException success) { }
   ended.countDown();
  }
 };
 try {
  taker.start();
  started.await();
  taker.interrupt();
  assertTrue(ended.await());
 } catch (Exception unexpected) {
  fail();
 }
}

You should add a timeout to your test method or to the latch (long enough to not interfere if the test passes, for example 5 seconds). That will avoid blocking your whole test suite.

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