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I have matrix like this: I want to group the columns by which they have same name and apply function to the rows of my matrix.

>data

      A  A  A  B  B  C
gene1 1  6 11 16 21 26
gene2 2  7 12 17 22 27
gene3 3  8 13 18 23 28
gene4 4  9 14 19 24 29
gene5 5 10 15 20 25 30

basically, I want put columns with same names like A to group 1, B to group 2,... and after that, I calculate T-test for each genes for all groups. can anybody help me how can I do this ? first : grouping, then applying the T-test, which return T score for each genes between different groups .

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Can you do dput(data) and post the output of that. Also, please share how you would want the output. –  Ananda Mahto Oct 2 '13 at 9:18
1  
I am wondering how do you have columns with a same name in R! –  user1436187 Oct 2 '13 at 9:40
    
@Ananda Mahto the output which I want : the output that I want is : the table which rows are genes and the columns are group i vs group j and the entry of the table would be the T-score of gene x in group i vs group j . the first problem is that, how should I make the columns with same name as one group ? then after that, I want to calculate T-test for each genes (rows) between all possible groups –  user2806363 Oct 2 '13 at 9:42
1  
@user1436187, you can with matrices, and with data.frames if you use check.names = FALSE. –  Ananda Mahto Oct 2 '13 at 9:42

1 Answer 1

The OP hasn't mentioned what form they want in their output, but I'm entirely updating this answer with a possible solution.

First, some reproducible sample data to work with (that will actually work with t.test).

set.seed(1)
mymat <- matrix(sample(100, 40, replace = TRUE), 
                ncol = 8, dimnames = list(
                  paste("gene", 1:5, sep = ""), 
                  c("A", "A", "A", "B", "B", "B", "C", "C")))
mymat
#        A  A  A   B  B  B  C  C
# gene1 27 90 21  50 94 39 49 67
# gene2 38 95 18  72 22  2 60 80
# gene3 58 67 69 100 66 39 50 11
# gene4 91 63 39  39 13 87 19 73
# gene5 21  7 77  78 27 35 83 42

I've left all the hard work to the combn function. Within the combn function, I've made use of the FUN argument to add a function that creates a vector of the t.test "statistic" by each row (I'm assuming one gene per row). I've also added an attribute to the resulting vector to remind us which columns were used in calculating the statistic.

temp <- combn(unique(colnames(mymat)), 2, FUN = function(x) {
  out <- vector(length = nrow(mymat))
  for (i in sequence(nrow(mymat))) {
    out[i] <- t.test(mymat[i, colnames(mymat) %in% x[1]], 
           mymat[i, colnames(mymat) %in% x[2]])$statistic
  }
  attr(out, "NAME") <- paste(x, collapse = "")
  out
}, simplify = FALSE)

The output of the above is a list of vectors. It might be more convenient to convert this into a matrix. Since we know that each value in a vector represents one row, and each vector overall represents one column value combination (AB, AC, or BC), we can use that for the dimnames of the resulting matrix.

DimNames <- list(rownames(mymat), sapply(temp, attr, "NAME"))

final <- do.call(cbind, temp)
dimnames(final) <- DimNames
final
#               AB         AC           BC
# gene1 -0.5407966 -0.5035088  0.157386919
# gene2  0.5900350 -0.7822292 -1.645448267
# gene3 -0.2040539  1.7263502  1.438525163
# gene4  0.6825062  0.5933218  0.009627409
# gene5 -0.4384258 -0.9283003 -0.611226402

Some manual verification:

## Should be the same as final[1, "AC"]
t.test(mymat[1, colnames(mymat) %in% "A"],
       mymat[1, colnames(mymat) %in% "C"])$statistic
#          t 
# -0.5035088 

## Should be the same as final[5, "BC"]    
t.test(mymat[5, colnames(mymat) %in% "B"],
       mymat[5, colnames(mymat) %in% "C"])$statistic
#          t 
# -0.6112264 

## Should be the same as final[3, "AB"]
t.test(mymat[3, colnames(mymat) %in% "A"],
       mymat[3, colnames(mymat) %in% "B"])$statistic
#          t 
# -0.2040539 

Update

Building on @EDi's answer, here's another approach. It makes use of melt from "reshape2" to convert the data into a "long" format. From there, as before, it's pretty straightforward subsetting work to get what you want. The output there is transposed in relation to the approach taken with the pure combn approach, but the values are the same.

library(reshape2)
mymatL <- melt(mymat)

byGene <- split(mymatL, mymatL$Var1)
RowNames <- combn(unique(as.character(mymatL$Var2)), 2, 
                  FUN = paste, collapse = "")

out <- sapply(byGene, function(combos) {
  combn(unique(as.character(mymatL$Var2)), 2, FUN = function(x) {
    t.test(value ~ Var2, combos[combos[, "Var2"] %in% x, ])$statistic
  }, simplify = TRUE)
})

rownames(out) <- RowNames
out
#         gene1      gene2      gene3       gene4      gene5
# AB -0.5407966  0.5900350 -0.2040539 0.682506188 -0.4384258
# AC -0.5035088 -0.7822292  1.7263502 0.593321770 -0.9283003
# BC  0.1573869 -1.6454483  1.4385252 0.009627409 -0.6112264

The first option is considerably faster, at least on this smaller dataset:

microbenchmark(fun1(), fun2())
# Unit: milliseconds
#    expr       min        lq    median       uq      max neval
#  fun1()  8.812391  9.012188  9.116896  9.20795 17.55585   100
#  fun2() 42.754296 43.388652 44.263760 45.47216 67.10531   100
share|improve this answer
1  
your code is not computing what exactly I want. for example, for the matix in my example, I want to calculate T-test for gene1 for diffrent groups, which means, calculating T-score for gene1 : T-score-gene1 : A<-c(1 6 11), B<-c(6 21), C<-c(26) is calculating pairwise T-score between A vs B A vs C and B vs C . I want to do this for all rows (all genes). so how can I modify your code to do this task ? –  user2806363 Oct 2 '13 at 10:30
3  
@user2806363, sorry, but until you actually post a well-formed question with reproducible sample data and a sample of your expected output (as part of the question, not as unreadable code in comments), you're probably not going to get any meaningful help. –  Ananda Mahto Oct 2 '13 at 10:32
1  
@user2806363, I've decided to go ahead and take a stab at what I think you might be looking for. In the future, however, it is better to be clear up front so that you don't have to post repeated questions to try to get an acceptable answer. Also, it helps if you show what you have fiddled with in the meantime--there were some good ideas shared in the earlier answers which could have at least gotten you close to how you might (1) want to solve the problem or (2) how you should present the problem to others more clearly. –  Ananda Mahto Oct 2 '13 at 11:28
1  
@user2806363, Now this is actually getting irritating for people who are offering free help. View the structure of the output of t.test on a single example. See where I took the statistic value from, and see if you can modify the code that I have already shared to come up with your own answer about how to include the P-value for each T-score. Thanks. –  Ananda Mahto Oct 2 '13 at 12:52
1  
let us continue this discussion in chat –  Ananda Mahto Oct 2 '13 at 15:31

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