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I have a class that I use in my C++ code and in some Lua scripts. The relevant portion of the class looks like:

typedef boost::shared_ptr<Thing> ThingPtr; // convenient

class Thing
{
public:
    Thing() { /* do some stuff */ }
    ~virtual Thing() { }

    ThingPtr createThing()
    {
        ThingPtr thing(new Thing);

        // initialization can't be done in constructor
        thing->doSomeInit();

        return thing;
    }     

// other stuff....

};

I expose this class in Lua (without using binding or anything "fancy"). Before I added the factory function, my Lua function to create a Thing looked like:

int MyLua::newThing(lua_State* L)
{
    int size = sizeof(Thing);

    // allocate a new Thing object in place
    new ((Thing*)lua_newuserdata(L, size)) Thing();

    luaL_setmetatable(L, "MyStuff.thing");

    return 1;
}

Once I added the factory function I did something like:

int MyLua::newThing(lua_State* L)
{
    int size = sizeof(Thing);

    // allocate a new Thing object in place
    Thing* thing = new ((Thing*)lua_newuserdata(L, size)) Thing();
    thing->doSomeInit();

    luaL_setmetatable(L, "MyStuff.thing");

    return 1;
}

This is fine seemed fine except that now I want to make the constructor of Thing private in order to enforce the use of the factory function in other places in the C++ code. So, now I have something like:

int MyLua::newThing(lua_State* L)
{
    int size = sizeof(Thing);
    ThingPtr thing = Thing::createThing();

    void* space = lua_newuserdata(L, size);
    memcpy(space, client.get(), size);

    luaL_setmetatable(L, "MyStuff.thing");

    return 1;
}

My question is: is there a better way to do this? The call to memcpy makes me feel uncomfortable.

share|improve this question
    
Unrelated and pedantic note: you shouldn't be able to pass a static member function as a lua_CFunction because a static member function never has C language linkage. Most compilers don't diagnose this but the standard says it's not allowed. – Simple Oct 2 '13 at 10:27
    
don't use anything fancy, just use a binding, such as LuaBridge, the manual of which explains all the pains of object lifetime management and offers solutions. – Dmitry Ledentsov Oct 2 '13 at 16:09
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You cannot transfer ownership of C++ objects to Lua.

Your original code is flawed, because it will never call the destructor for your Things. While Lua will garbage collect the memory allocated through lua_newuserdata, it will not call the object's destructor (simply because Lua, being a C library, does not know about the concept of destructors).

So you will need a separate construct on the C++ side that manages the lifetime of your objects and only pass the raw (non-owning) pointers to Lua to be exposed as userdata.

share|improve this answer
    
I believe Lua "owns" the object in the original code, since I'm using the space Lua provided in its allocation. I also handled the cleanup with my own __gc function which deletes the object. – Addy Oct 2 '13 at 11:24
1  
@Addy While this works in theory, I would advise against it, since Lua's guarantees on invoking finalizers are much weaker than C++'s guarantees for invoking destructors. I'd rather recommend that the __gc call merely signals the C++ code to release the object. The risk of accidentally running into undefined behavior because of messed up finalizers is too great to justify the slight comfort win here imho. – ComicSansMS Oct 2 '13 at 12:05
1  
I don't understand what you gain by just signaling to C++ to release the object. If you're relying on Lua to invoke __gc in order to signal to C++ that the object is ready to release, why not get rid of the intermediate step and just release the object in the __gc call? – Addy Oct 2 '13 at 12:15
    
@Addy The worst thing that happens if you miss the Lua signal is that the object is kept alive longer than necessary. The worst thing that happens if Lua does the delete itself is that you delete without invoking the Destructor, which can have devastating, unforeseeable consequences. I personally also find it far more difficult to reason about the guarantees provided by the latter case because it involves subtle corner cases of the implementation. I just don't see the point in having to worry about this when leaving the ownership with C++ provides a straightforward solution. – ComicSansMS Oct 2 '13 at 12:23

It should make you uncomfortable; memcpy is only allowed for trivially-copyable types (Thing is not such a type). I'm not even sure that new (lua_newuserdata(L, size)) Thing() is allowed because Lua uses realloc to claim new memory by default and this can result in the memory being moved (i.e. realloc might memcpy it anyway).

The solution, IMO, is to dynamically allocate your Thing (which it seems your createThing factory does do but with a smart pointer) and store a C pointer to the object in user data with a __gc metamethod that cleans up your object. With a smart pointer this is more complicated but it would involve storing a copy of the smart pointer on the heap, storing a C pointer to the smart pointer in the user data and then freeing the smart pointer in the __gc metamethod.

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