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My issue is seemingly extremely simple. I make a calendar graphic user interface, from a GregorianCalendar object, and uses it's methods to calculate the correct number of days in the different months, and the different date's corresponding weekdays.

But the weekdays are consistentyl one day off. The Calendar claims that the 1st of July 2013 is a '2', which in my part of the world means tuesday. It should have been a '1' for Monday. "Easy!" i think, and put in the line: c.setFirstDayOfWeek(Calendar.MONDAY); But no reaction is given.

So I search stackoverflow for an answer, but everyone with my problem seem to have forgotten that January is 0, and not 1. I haven't. So now I am stuck.

As a simplifyed code, I have made a very short code piece, with it's corresponding output:

    GregorianCalendar c = new GregorianCalendar();
    c.setFirstDayOfWeek(Calendar.MONDAY);
    c.set(Calendar.MONTH, 6);
    c.set(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH, 1);
    c.set(Calendar.YEAR, 2013);

    SimpleDateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat("dd-MM-YYYY");
    System.out.println(sdf.format(c.getTime()));
    System.out.println(c.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK));

and the output is:

01-07-2013

2

I refuse to put in a "-1" in my code, to wrongly correct the symptoms of what is obviously a mistake. Help is appreciated.

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For better help sooner, post an SSCCE. –  Andrew Thompson Oct 2 '13 at 11:51
4  
2 is Monday... 1 is Sunday... Also, setFirstDayOfWeek, according to the doc: The first week of a month or year is defined as the earliest seven day period beginning on getFirstDayOfWeek() and containing at least getMinimalDaysInFirstWeek() days of that month or year. There is no obvious mistake in there. Just localization issue... –  ppeterka Oct 2 '13 at 11:52
    
Thanks. As of now, I've stopped trying to set Monday as the first day of the week. It just seemed simpler to edit my other code to expect that sunday is number 1, no matter how illogical it appears to me. Thanks for telling me that my mistake was my interpretation of the setFirstDayOfWeek()-method. That could have been hard to find on my own. I wish I could accept it as an answer, but it seems like it is only posted as a comment. –  KjetilNordin Oct 2 '13 at 12:10
    
@AndrewThompson, I would be happy to learn how to ask questions better. In this case I have definitely shortened down the code to include only the specifics to my problem. As far as I can see the only thing missing for it to be executable, is a main method and some imports. But please, any specifics here would be welcome. –  KjetilNordin Oct 2 '13 at 12:22
    
Specifically, read the linked document. There is more to an SSCCE than just 'short', and those things that you left out made the code a short 'uncompilable code snippet' (or SUCS, if you like) as opposed to an SSCCE. –  Andrew Thompson Oct 2 '13 at 12:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I refuse to put in a "-1" in my code, to wrongly correct the symptoms of what is obviously a mistake.

The mistake is your assumption that Calendar.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK) is localized. It isn't. The mapping between day-of-week and number is fixed; use Calendar.getFirstDayOfWeek() to determine the human understanding of "first day of the week" if you need to; I'd be surprised if you really wanted to show a user "2" anyway... surely you'd want to show them the name of the day of the week.

Any calculations involving the start of the week should use getFirstDayOfWeek though.

share|improve this answer
    
That is exactly what I managed to get out of an earlier comment. Awesome answer! Thanks. And as an extra comment; I parsed the integer value to another WeekDay enum value, so that I could get the name of the weekday in my mother tongue. Thanks again. –  KjetilNordin Oct 2 '13 at 12:14
    
@KjetilNordin: Ideally, use DateFormatSymbols.getInstance(locale).getWeekdays() for that. –  Jon Skeet Oct 2 '13 at 12:41

Yes, date handling in Java is problematic...

  • Months start from 0 (JANUARY)
  • days of week start from SUNDAY being 1, SATURDAY being seven (Ideone fiddle)
  • c.setFirstDayOfWeek(Calendar.MONDAY); is a bit different than what the name suggests

    The first week of a month or year is defined as the earliest seven day period beginning on getFirstDayOfWeek() and containing at least getMinimalDaysInFirstWeek() days of that month or year

You can get out of troubles by always using the constants defined in the Calendar class, and not even trying to deduce any meaning from the numerical representations of those constants, or the results returned by the Calendar.get(int) method...

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This is also a really good answer +1. I have been working with Calendar objects for the better part of six months now, and I have learned a lot, thanks to guys like you. I love the wording of the final paragraph in your answer. –  KjetilNordin Apr 1 at 12:39

This is one of the caveats in Java,

DAY_OF_WEEK,

This field takes values SUNDAY, MONDAY, TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY, FRIDAY, and SATURDAY.

When your program prints 2, it's telling you that the day of week is MONDAY. This constant value has nothing to do with the beginning of the week. It does coincidentally happen to be the same as the day of the week if the first day of the week is SUNDAY - but it doesn't change if the first day of the week is redefined.

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